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ABCT - Auto Body Collision Technology

ABCT1801 Auto Body Lab I (4 credits)
This course will allow the students to develop and to practice skills needed in the auto body industry through hands-on experience.

ABCT1802 Auto Body Lab II (4 credits)
This course will allow the students to develop and to practice skills needed in the auto body industry through hands-on experience.

ABCT1805 Auto Body Collision Technology Fundamentals (2 credits)
This course introduces students to the auto body industry, its careers and work standards. Basic shop procedures are covered in the course and students gain insight to the equipment, personal health, safety, and special tools used in auto body repair. (Prerequisites: None)

ABCT1810 Sheet Metal I (3 credits)
Students learn the characteristics of sheet metal repair processes in minor damage. Students practice sheet metal repair on panels or damage on vehicles. Students learn material product safety and safe use of body fillers.

ABCT1820 Priming and Refinish System Preparation (3 credits)
This course teaches students refinishing safety, tools, equipment, surface preparation, and material application procedures.

ABCT1840 Auto Collision Mechanical I (3 credits)
This course covers the principles of removing and replacing mechanical components in front and rear wheel drive vehicles as related to the auto body industry. The course includes environmental issues. (Prerequisites: None)

ABCT1850 Trim, Hardware and Glass (3 credits)
Students learn safe procedures for removal and replacement of stationery and movable glass. Also covered are various methods of trim and hardware attachments.

ABCT1860 Auto Body Welding (3 credits)
This course covers safety procedures, setup and operation of MIG and oxyacetylene welding equipment. Flat, vertical, horizontal and overhead positions on automotive sheet metal will be practiced. Oxyacetylene and plasma arc cutting processes are included.

ABCT1870 Refinishing (3 credits)
This course teaches panel, blending, and overall refinish procedures using single and multi-stage refinish products.

ABCT1880 Sheet Metal II (3 credits)
This course teaches advanced sheet metal repairs, replacement and sectioning on exterior cosmetic panels, panel adjustments, and fitting procedures.

ABCT2800 Damage Appraisal and Shop Management (3 credits)
This course includes identification and calculation of vehicle damage using manuals and computer assisted procedures. Shop management procedures will include inventory management, parts and repair ordering, customer relations, and communication skills.

ABCT2803 Auto Body Lab III (4 credits)
This course will allow the students to develop and practice skills needed in the auto body industry through hands-on experience.

ABCT2804 Auto Body Lab IV (4 credits)
This course will allow the student to develop and to practice skills needed in the auto body industry through hands-on experience.

ABCT2805 Auto Body and Collision Air Conditioning (2 credits)
This course covers the principles of air conditioning. Various system types, collision damage analysis, malfunction diagnosis, testing, and repair are studied in the classroom. Practical work such as component replacement, system evacuation, charging, and performance testing will be included. (Prerequisites: None)

ABCT2810 Appearance Matching (3 credits)
This course teaches students identification and correction of color match and appearance problems. The techniques of tinting, color correction, paint, and vehicle detailing will be covered.

ABCT2820 Composites (2 credits)
This course teaches students identification and safe repair of interior and exterior automotive plastics including sheet molded compound and fiberglass.

ABCT2830 Measuring and Pulling Systems (3 credits)
Students will use mechanical and computer assisted measuring systems to analyze and develop repair procedures on frame and unibody vehicles. Frame racks, bench, and floor pulling systems will be utilized to repair direct and indirect damage on open and closed panels.

ABCT2850 Structural Repair (3 credits)
This course covers replacement, sectioning procedures and corrosion protection of the frame, unibody, and structural members and components. Wheel alignment as it applies during structural repair will be covered.

ABCT2870 Auto Collision Mechanical II (3 credits)
This course teaches collision service techniques for chassis, electronic components, steering and suspension systems, antilock brake systems, air bags, and related vehicle safety systems.

ABCT2900 Auto Body Lab (1 - 4 credits)
This course will allow the students to develop and practice skills needed in the auto body industry through hands-on experience. This is a variable credit offering.

ABCT2910 Occupational Internship (1 - 9 credits)
Students will work in a sponsoring auto body facility. A training plan will be developed and utilized. (Prerequisite: Instructor Approval)

ABCT2920 Special Problems (1 - 6 credits)
This course will be of individual design to allow students hands-on or classroom as needed to practice skills required in the auto body industry.

ACCT - Accounting

ACCT1700 Personal Financial Management (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide insight into personal financial decision making. This includes budgeting, banking, use of credit and credit cards, renting vs. owning a home, retirement investing, investment opportunities, insurance, income taxes, wills, and effects of financial distress on one's life. In addition, we will compare income levels for various occupations. Students will examine real life situations. There will be some professional guest speakers who will share their expertise with the students. (Prerequisites: None)

ACCT1800 Business Law (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the principles of law as they apply to citizens and businesses. Topics include ethics, the court system, the legal system, contracts, negotiable instruments, agency and employment, bailments, business organizations, sales and insurance. (Prerequisites: None)

ACCT1810 Financial Accounting (4 credits)
This course covers the fundamental accounting concepts and principles which are used in a business environment. Topics include an introduction to accounting and business, completing the accounting cycle, inventories, internal controls, receivables, cash flow statements and financial analysis. (Prerequisites: None)

ACCT1811 Managerial Accounting (4 credits)
This course focuses on current and long-term liabilities, partnerships, corporations, long-term investments, managerial accounting concepts, job costing, process costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, and capital budgeting. (Prerequisite: ACCT1810 with a grade of C or higher)

ACCT1814 Payroll Accounting (3 credits)
This course covers various state and federal laws pertaining to the computation and payment of salaries and wages. Topics include preparation of employment records, payroll registers, time cards, employee earnings records, and state and federal reports. In addition, we will explore setting up and maintaining a payroll system using Quickbooks. (Prerequisite: None)

ACCT1834 Computerized Accounting I (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the use of computers and related software used in the accounting function of the business environment. Topics include, but are not limited to general ledger accounting, payroll procedures, accounts receivable, and accounts payable. The student is also introduced to spreadsheet and database software and their interrelationship with a fully integrated accounting software program. Software for this program includes QuickBooks, Excel, and Access. (Prerequisites: None)

ACCT1835 Computerized Accounting II (3 credits)
This is the second of the two computerized accounting application series. Topics include, but are not limited to, general ledger accounting, payroll procedures, accounts receivable, accounts payable, and job cost accounting. The student is also introduced to advance functions of spreadsheet software and their interrelationship with a fully integrated accounting software program. Software for this program includes SAGE 50 and EXCEL Expert. (Prerequisite: ACCT 1834)

ACCT1870 Professional Accounting Careers (1 credits)
This course covers specific topics relating to applying for accounting positions. Topics covered in this course are your appearance, networking tips, exploring different accounting careers, meeting your job's expectations, preparing resumes, and interviewing techniques. Each student is required to have one employment interview as part of this course. (Prerequisites: None)

ACCT2821 Intermediate Accounting I (3 credits)
This is the first of the two course intermediate accounting series. The content of this course covers an overview of the accounting process, the balance sheet, the income statement and statement of cash flows, the time value of money and other various components of the balance sheet. (Prerequisite: ACCT 1810)

ACCT2822 Intermediate Accounting II (3 credits)
This is the second of the two course intermediate accounting series. The content of the course covers operational assets, investments, current liabilities and contingencies, long-term debt, leases, accounting for income taxes, accounting changes and error corrections and other advanced accounting topics. (Prerequisites: ACCT 2821 or equivalent)

ACCT2827 Principles of Finance (3 credits)
This course introduces the student to finance concepts for small to medium size businesses. Concepts covered in this course include financial markets, implication of interest rates to business, understanding of financial statements, risk versus return, use of debt financing, use of equity financing, capital budgeting concepts, cost of capital, determining the appropriate financing mix, forecasting techniques, working capital management, and liquid asset management. (Prerequisites: ACCT 1810)

ACCT2847 Fraud, Auditing and Internal Controls (4 credits)
In this course students will learn about occupational fraud, basic auditing techniques and evaluation of internal controls. Covered topics include how and why fraud is committed, fraud detection, establishing and evaluating internal controls, and using internal auditing techniques to verify account balances. (Prerequisites: ACCT 1810)

ACCT2850 Accounting Internship (1 - 8 credits)
This course provides students with actual experiences in accounting careers. A competency-based internship plan will be developed for each student. The student can receive internship credit for participating in the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program at SCC in conjunction with the Internal Revenue Service, Minnesota Department of Revenue, and Minnesota Valley Action Council. (Prerequisite: Instructor approval)

ACCT2861 Cost Accounting I (4 credits)
This course covers managerial accounting cost concepts and behaviors. Examples of job order costing, process costing, and accounting for materials, direct labor, and factory overhead will be discussed. (Prerequisites: ACCT 1810, 1811 with a grade of C or higher)

ACCT2862 Cost Accounting II (3 credits)
This course is an extension of ACCT 2861. This course covers budgeting, standard costing, direct costing, differential analysis, capital planning, transfer pricing, and decision making under uncertainty. (Prerequisites: ACCT 2861 or equivalent)

ACCT2863 Fund/NonProfit Accounting (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to assist students in gaining a knowledge of accounting and financial reporting currently recommended for state and local governmental entities, school districts, and other not-for-profit organizations. The course will assist the student in developing a knowledge of the accounting differences between governmental and not-for-profit entities and business enterprises. (Prerequisites: ACCT 1810)

ACCT2864 Income Tax I (4 credits)
The purpose of this course is to expose students to an explanation of Federal and Minnesota individual income tax as it relates to the preparation of the required tax returns. Tax research is also examined in this course. Students will have hands-on experience in preparing Federal and Minnesota income tax returns. (Prerequisites: None)

ACCT2865 Income Tax II (3 credits)
This course provides an explanation and interpretation of the Internal Revenue Code as applied to sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Topics include business income, expenses, business tax credits, withholding and payment of established estate and trust tax issues, taxes, installment sales, and inventories. (Prerequisites: ACCT 2864)

ACCT2900 Accounting Review (3 credits)
This course reviews financial accounting, ethics and professional conduct, business law, taxation and managerial accounting concepts. This course will prepare the student for the ACAT Comprehensive Examination for Accreditations in Accountancy. (Prerequisites: ACCT 1800, 2821, 2861, 2864)

AGBS - Agri-Business

AGBS1100 Agricultural Selling Skills (3 credits)
This course covers the basic and advanced principles and techniques used in selling agricultural merchandise and services. Agricultural Sales has taken on increased importance in recent years. The introduction of new products and services has magnified the need for technically competent knowledgeable sales personnel. Role-playing and advanced, in-depth sales presentations will be done in class. Students will also be required to make an industry visit and write appropriate letters. (Prerequisites: None)

AGBS2015 Commercial Driver's License (1 credits)
Students prepare for the Commercial Motor Vehicles General Knowledge (written) Test, related required Endorsements (written) Test(s), related optional Endorsements (written) Test(s), and the Pre-Trip Inspection (skills) Examination. The goal in this course is to obtain a MN Class A CDL permit. (Prerequisites: None).

AGBS2150 Agribusiness Financial Management (4 credits)
This course covers major aspects of agribusiness from financial management through financial problem solving, analysis, and planning. Students will apply economic and financial concepts by creating balance sheets, income statements, cash flows, inventory controls, and budgets. Students will have the opportunity to apply what they have learned in a computerized farm supply business simulation. Students will also develop management skills needed to be an effective agribusiness manager. (Prerequisites: AGEC 1100)

AGBS2990 International Field Study (3 credits)
This international field study seminar introduces students to agricultural, food, and natural resource systems of other countries of the world. The course consists of two major components: a series of pre- and/or post-departure workshops and an in-depth short-term structured international experience within a host country or countries. Students gain global perspective through exposure to international history, cultures, and socio-economic situations of the country or countries visited. Students explore, compare, and contrast food, fiber, and fuel systems of the country or countries visited. (Prerequisites: None)

AGBS2995 Individualized Study/Special Problems (1 - 6 credits)
This course allows the student to pursue special projects or areas of interest. The number of credits must be agreed upon by advisor/advisee prior to registration. (Prerequisites: Successful completion of two semesters of training or by special arrangement)

AGCH - Ag Chemical Applicator Technician

AGCH1100 Fertilizer Industry Equipment (2 credits)
This course covers all fertilizer application methods. Equipment focus will include airflow, spinner, soilection, liquid application, and injection application systems. Knowledge of equipment, associated systems operation, and maintenance will be learned. Safe operation of this equipment will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: None)

AGCH1200 Herbicide Industry Equipment (2 credits)
This course covers all herbicide application methods. Equipment will include terragator, rogator, operation and maintenance along with the associated systems. Safe operation of this equipment will be emphasized. Monitors, marking systems, controllers and hydraulic systems will be reviewed. Customer relations between the operator and farmer will be covered. Calculation of product applied and application record keeping is a part of the class. (Prerequisites: Instructor and Agribusiness operator prior approval and a signed agreement)

AGCH1300 Work Experience - Equipment Operation I (1 - 4 credits)
This course is a cooperative work-study program between SCC and local fertilizer and chemical businesses to allow the students to have on the job experience in the Ag Chemical field. (Prerequisites: Instructor and Agribusiness operator prior approval and a signed agreement.)

AGCH1305 Work Experience-Equipment Operation II (1 - 4 credits)
This course features a cooperative on the job education program in an agribusiness field. Application of competencies gained from previous course work will be emphasized. Specific tasks to be completed by the student will be identified in an individualized training plan. (Prerequisites: Instructor and Agribusiness operator prior approval and a signed agreement)

AGEC - Agri-Business

AGEC1100 Introduction to Agricultural Economics (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to agricultural economics. Economic concepts of the food, fiber, and fuel industry will be explored though problem solving exercises and graphical analysis. Consumer and business behavior will be analyzed under various market and regulatory conditions, with major focus spent on determining changes to equilibrium of aggregate supply and demand curves. Both microeconomic and macroeconomic factors will be defined and discussed in relation to global and local agribusiness value chains, including many factors affecting farmers in the American Midwest. (Prerequisite: None)

AGEC1200 Principles of Farm Records (3 credits)
This course covers types of records, setup and use of accounts through computerization of farm information. Discussion of the types of record keeping systems will be covered, a review of various record keeping systems and tools used to input, analyze and utilize the information from the farm business activity. Selection and implementation of a record keeping program will be required. Students will initiate records on a current farming operation. (Prerequisite: None)

AGEC2250 Farm Business Planning & Analysis (4 credits)
This course covers closeout and analysis of a farm accounting problem or the student's own farm business. Also covered will be various analysis techniques, a comparative analysis of all farm production, efficiency and financial factors and a review of current tax management factors. The course will review enterprise, whole farm business and personal expenses in South Central Minnesota region. The course will also cover cash flows, business plans and enterprise budgeting. This course will focus on financial management records and the analysis of each production component of the business. Students will use FinPack software to complete their analysis and to develop business plans for their future business goals. (Prerequisites: AGEC 1200)

AGEC2400 Commodity Marketing Principles (3 credits)
This course covers the principles of agricultural commodity marketing, including cash, forward, futures, and options contracts. Economic impacts on supply, demand, and equilibrium pricing for commodities will be explored. Students will participate in simulated marketing transactions and track local and terminal market pricing. (Prerequisite: AGEC 1100)

AGEC2450 Commodity Marketing Strategies (2 credits)
This course covers strategies of commodity marketing of agricultural products. Students will apply marketing principles in various market situations. Students will work with forward contracts, basis contracts, futures contracts, and option strategies in agriculture commodities. Students will develop market plans for agribusiness marketing and input needs. (Prerequisites: AGEC 1100, AGEC 2400)

AGEC2500 Agribusiness Transfer & Law (2 credits)
This course covers farm estate planning and law topics with direct application to production agriculture. Topics include federal and state estate tax laws and their impact on the transfer of agriculture property. Estate planning options such as wills, life insurance and trusts will be explored. Other topics include farm partnerships and corporations, agricultural legal case studies, basic contracts, legal land descriptions, fence regulations, animal legalities, water rights, bankruptcy, gifting, and liability issues. (Prerequisite: None)

AGEC2600 Alternative Agriculture (2 credits)
One of the changes taking place in agriculture is an increasing interest in the production of alternative crop and animal enterprises. This class will examine and evaluate those enterprises. A look at the profitability, marketing and risks of producing a alternative product as well as the resources and information available to assist in developing a plan to produce an alternative product. The opportunities to produce a value-added product will be studied. A close look will be taken of producers currently raising and marketing alternative agriculture products.We will also examine the current factors driving the movement towards local foods and alternative enterprises. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME - Ag Business Mechanics

AGME1801 Outdoor Power Equipment (3 credits)
This course covers operational theory and service competencies necessary to service small four-stroke cycle engines, two-stroke cycle engines, lawn/garden equipment, and chain saws. Fuel systems, electrical systems, tune-up, drive train adjustment, and attachments are emphasized. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME1812 Equipment Assembly, Operation, Adjustment and Reconditioning I (2 credits)
This course covers basic tillage and planting equipment. The student will learn all component parts and proper adjustment of units. Machine adjustment may be accomplished on demonstration units, operator manual examples, and actual equipment, or on field trips. In the machinery set-up and reconditioning portion the student identifies set-up and reconditioning procedures, follows the set-up and operator's manual, uses a checksheet, uses a torque chart, learns the procedure for threading and taping, installs heli-coils and keenserts, sharpens drill bits, installs the hydraulic system, follows the hydraulic diagram, assembles machinery, touches up paint, and adjusts the equipment for field use. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME1813 Equipment Assembly, Operation, Adjustment and Reconditioning II (2 credits)
This course covers basic harvesting equipment. The student will learn all component parts and proper adjustment of units. Machine adjustment may be accomplished on demonstration units, operator manual examples, and actual equipment, or on field trips. In the machinery set-up and reconditioning portion the student identifies set-up and reconditioning procedures, follows the set-up and operator's manual, uses a checksheet, uses a torque chart, learns the procedure for threading and taping, installs heli-coils and keenserts, sharpens drill bits, installs the hydraulic system, follows the hydraulic diagram, assembles machinery, touches up paint, and adjusts the equipment for field use. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME1821 Precision Measuring Tools (1 credits)
This course covers using precision tools. The student will learn to use micrometers and vernier calipers (English and metric); torque wrenches; small hole and telescoping gauges; dial bore gauges; steel, iron, and wire gauges; feeler gauges; thread pitch gauges and plastigauges. Students will also learn compression testing (gas and diesel), cylinder leakage testing, and radiator cap, thermostat, and antifreeze testing. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME1822 Gas/Diesel Engine Repair I (3 credits)
This course covers overhauling an engine. Students will rebuild gas and diesel heads. Steps covered include grinding valves, seats, and rocker arms; replacing worn seats and guides; testing springs; and reassembling heads. In addition, students will perform tasks such as engine removal/replacement and disassembly/reassembly; sleeve removal/replacement; and crankshaft, camshaft, sleeve, piston, bearing, and rod measuring. The reassembled engine will be timed, adjusted, and tested on the dynamometer. (Prerequisites: AGME 1821)

AGME1823 Engine Support Systems and Lab (3 credits)
This course covers cooling, lubrication, and intake/exhaust systems. The student will identify, troubleshoot, and repair each of the systems. The student will also become familiar with special tools necessary to service these systems. The laboratory portion of the class involves overhauling an engine and should be taken in conjunction with AGME1822. Students will increase their understanding and knowledge by applying the materials and procedures learned in Gas/Diesel Engine Repair I. (Prerequisite: AGME 1821)

AGME1831 Tractor Power Trains (3 credits)
This course includes lecture instruction and laboratory experience in dry clutches, wet clutches, mechanical transmissions, power take-off units, final drives, differentials, brakes, and steering. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME1861 Tractor Electrical Systems (3 credits)
This course covers the fundamentals of electricity and its application to farm equipment electrical systems. The content includes wiring diagrams, batteries, test equipment, charging systems, cranking systems, ignition systems, and diagnostic service procedures. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME1881 Parts Department Operation (1 credits)
This course covers the basics in the operation of an agricultural equipment dealership. The major emphasis is the parts department area. A total review of this department will be covered in class. (Prerequisite: None)

AGME1891 Hydraulic Theory (1 credits)
This course covers basic hydraulic systems used with modern agricultural equipment. This course will focus on the basic principles and the study of hydraulic components that make up the modern hydraulic systems. Students must read and sign the safety eyeglass form required by the state. (Prerequisite: None)

AGME1923 Gas/Diesel Engine Repair II (4 credits)
This course is designed to assist the students in building their understanding and application of materials and procedures learned in Gas/Diesel Engine Repair I, Power Trains, Electrical Systems, and other mechanical courses. The students will repair customer units. The primary repair work will involve engine overhaul (gas and diesel), clutch, brake, and electrical repairs. Customer units must be completed by the end of the course. (Prerequisites: AGME1821. Students must be enrolled in the Agribusiness Service Technician program)

AGME1930 Ag Welding (2 credits)
This is an introduction to both electric arc and gas welding. Also included is a short section on the wire welding system. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME2832 Hydraulic Assist/Hydrostatic Transmissions (2 credits)
This course covers speed change, powershaft, and hydrostatic transmissions. The student identifies transmission operation, traces powerflow, and diagnoses problems. The student performs disassembly, repairing, reassembly, testing, and adjusting of various transmissions. The transmissions covered in the course include John Deere 8 and 16 speed, International Harvester TA, White 3 speed, Case RPS-34, Case-IH Magnum, and Sunstrand/Eaton hydrostatic. (Prerequisites: AGME 1821, AGME 1831)

AGME2841 Air Conditioning (1 credits)
This course covers the air conditioning system. The student will reclaim, evacuate, charge, test, and diagnose the air conditioning system. Refrigerant identification equipment will be utilized. Compressor seal and head gasket replacement is included. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME2852 Introduction to Diesel (1 credits)
This course covers an introduction to the diesel system, components, operation, and servicing nozzles. The student will study construction and operation of nozzles, as well as test, clean, repair, adjust, and diagnose multi-orifice and pintle nozzles. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME2853 Diesel Injection (Pumps) (3 credits)
This course covers the operation, disassembly, repair, and adjustment of injection pumps. Rotary injection pumps covered are the Roosa Master DB, DC, DM2, DM4, and DB2 diesel pumps, the CAV DPA diesel pump, the Robert Bosch VE diesel pump, and the United Technologies Model 100 diesel pump. The Robert Bosch PES inline injection pump with the RSV governor will be included. Students will identify pump operation and component parts; disassemble, repair, and adjust internal parts; reassemble the pump; and perform pump adjustments on the test bench. (Prerequisite: None)

AGME2863 Advanced Agricultural Electrical/Electronics (2 credits)
This course covers review, troubleshooting, and diagnosis of charging and starting systems. Reading of schematics for all electrical areas are also included. Other areas covered are theory and operation of lighting, warning, accessory, cooling, steering, shifting, and hitch control circuits. Monitoring and control circuits found on planters and combines are included. G.P.S. systems will be touched on with equipment availability. (Prerequisites: AGME 1861)

AGME2882 Ag Tech Seminar (1 credits)
This course is designed to cover career opportunities, prospective placement, and current technical problems in the Agricultural Mechanics field. Time spent with topic areas may vary. (Prerequisites: None)

AGME2892 Hydraulic Theory and Diagnosis (4 credits)
This course covers the hydraulic systems found on most agricultural and industrial equipment. The hydraulic diagrams, pumps, open/closed/pfc systems, valve types, electric over hydraulics, and JIC diagrams are presented. The students will identify, test, diagnose, and repair hydraulic systems and components such as control valves, power steering, brakes, pumps, rockshafts, and motors. This course includes use of the flow rator, flow meter, and pressure gauges. (Prerequisites: AGME 1891)

AGME2940 Agribusiness Service Technician Internship (1 - 7 credits)
This course is a cooperative work-study program between the South Central College Agribusiness Department Service Technicians program and area dealership or industry, which allows the student an employment-like work experience. Application of competencies gained from previous coursework will be emphasized. Specific tasks to be accomplished by the student will be identified in an individualized student training plan. Variable credits 1-9 (Prerequisite: Enrolled in Agribusiness Service Technician Program)

AGME2945 Tractor/Equipment Repair I (3 credits)
This course provides the student with tractor service shop experience in hydraulics, diesel fuel systems, electrical systems, power trains, air conditioning, and engines. Students perform repair services on customer tractors and school units. (Prerequisites: AGME 1822, 1823, 1831, 1891, 1923)

AGME2946 Tractor/Equipment Repair II (4 credits)
This course provides the student with tractor service shop experience in hydraulics, diesel fuel systems, electrical systems, power trains, air conditioning, and engines. Students perform repair services on customer tractors and school units. (Prerequisite: AGME 2945)

AGME2947 Tractor/Equipment Diagnosis and Repair (4 credits)
This course provides the student with tractor service shop experience in hydraulics, diesel fuel systems, electrical systems, power trains, air conditioning, and engines. Students will perform repair services on customer tractors and school units and will compare their component repair time with flat rate. If you have a disability and need accommodations to participate in the course activities, please contact your instructor as soon as possible. (Prerequisites: AGME 2945. Student must be enrolled in the Agribusiness Service Technician program)

AGRI - Agri-Business

AGRI1800 Employer/Employee Relations (2 credits)
This course covers the principles of supervision and the factors of supervision as they relate to the goals of the business. Supervision problems with practical solutions will be emphasized. Personnel management techniques including determine personnel needs, finding and recruiting people, performance appraisals, training, promotions, legal issues, stress control and terminations will be included. Students will develop an employment portfolio. (Prerequisites: None)

AGRI1810 Intro to Sustainable Microfarming (1 credits)
This class is designed for individuals to enter agribusiness careers related to the growing demand by customers to purchase food produced locally. These operations tend to produce, manage, and market agricultural commodities differently than traditional agriculture models but have a tremendous potential in the new consumer marketplace. Students will be involved in all aspects of operation for a small farm to fork business model. Using a high tunnel as the form of production, this course will follow the growth process of vegetables on a local scale. Students will look at the ability to farm on a small scale, focusing on locally grown crops. They will evaluate the market for and ability to maintain production practices within a microfarming practice. (Prerequisite: None)

AGRI2700 Agricultural Technology Seminar (2 credits)
This seminar will provide students the opportunity to self-direct studies in agricultural technology in their areas of interest. Technologies to be considered could include but, are not limited to, plant protection, precision farming, application industries, livestock equipment, bio-technologies, financial resource management, sustainable agriculture, environmental impacts of agriculture, agricultural workforce, and agricultural production. Some organized events will be part of this course. The major emphasis will be self-directed learning. (AGEC 2400 or Instructor Permission)

AGRI2780 Agribusiness Internship (1 - 9 credits)
This course is a cooperative educational program between the student, faculty and the internship site/business. Students will apply competencies gained from previous coursework into an agribusiness industry workplace. Specific tasks to be completed by the student and will be identified in an individual training plan developed by the student, faculty and internship supervisor. Each training plan is specific to the individual student and business enterprise where the student is employed. (Prerequisite: Instructor Permission)

AIS - American Indian Studies

AIS112 Native American Perspectives (4 credits)
Native American Perspectives introduces students to writings about Native American life. Students will become acquainted with some myths and legends as well as contemporary literature. Students will also explore Native American culture, with a special emphasis on the environmental impacts of colonization. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 7, 10: Human Diversity, People & the Environment)

AIS120 Dakota Culture, History and Language (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the language, history and culture of the Dakota nation. Students will gain cultural, historical, and sociological knowledge and understanding of the Dakota nation through readings, lectures, guest speakers, and media. Students will learn some basic Dakota language skills. Students will be encouraged to engage critically on historical and contemporary issues and be inspired towards activism as they participate in service learning opportunities within the Native population. Various outside resources will be brought in to explore the Dakota language. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 7: Human Diversity and 9: Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

ANSC - Agri-Business

ANSC1100 Livestock Production Principles (3 credits)
This course covers animal production history and economic impact, breed development, animal anatomy and physiology, animal product features, gland and hormone functions, growth and lactation physiology, environmental animal production factors, and animal research. Course will focus on disease prevention and the means required to promote productive livestock production. Some time will be spent on analyzing specific diseases, describing symptoms, and treatment. (Prerequisites: None)

ANSC1105 Beef Production Management (3 credits)
This course covers topics current to the beef industry as a productive enterprise, including beef and dairy-beef feedlot and cow-calf operations. Course enrollees will concentrate on current resources available to the industry via the Internet, guest speakers and beef industry publications. (Prerequisites: None)

ANSC1200 Livestock Lab (2 credits)
This course is designed to teach the fundamental principles of livestock genetics in a practical manner. The course deals with the physiology of reproduction and application of genetics for improvement of the livestock herd. Livestock selection materials and methods of live animal and carcass evaluation will be conducted. Subjective and objective evaluation methods and measurements will be included. (Prerequisites: None)

ANSC1205 Ruminant Animal Production (3 credits)
Students will critically evaluate genetic, reproductive, economic and management criteria that influence profitability and sustainability of ruminants as viable agricultural animal enterprises in Minnesota, the United States and the World. This course will specifically focus on ruminant animals such as dairy, beef cattle, sheep and goats, as productive enterprises, including milk production, dairy-beef feedlot, as well as other ruminant animal production enterprises. Course enrollees will concentrate on current resources available to the industry via the Internet, guest speakers, tours and industry publications. (Prerequisites: None)

ANSC1305 Cattle Artificial Insemination (1 credits)
This course covers a study of the techniques and equipment necessary for the artificial insemination in cattle. Principles involved in heat selection, bull selection, semen collection and storage, semen evaluation, insemination, record keeping, mating appraisal, and cleanup procedures will all be addressed in this course. (Prerequisites: None)

ANSC2100 Principles of Animal Nutrition (3 credits)
This course provides basic information about the fundamentals of nutrition and the essential nutritional requirements of livestock. Units of instruction will include: nutrients and digestion, evaluating feedstuffs, characteristics of feedstuffs, processing techniques of various feeds, feed formulations, commercial feeds and feed additives. This course includes the discussion of the feeding practices of swine, cattle, poultry, and equine. (Prerequisites: None)

ANTH - Anthropology

ANTH100 Introduction to Anthropology (4 credits)
Introduction to Anthropology is a survey course investigating the biological and cultural nature of humans and their past. The course examines our evolutionary beginning and the role culture plays among humans. Examined also is the methods anthropologists use to study the discipline. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

ART - Art Studies

ART100 Art Appreciation (3 credits)
Art Appreciation is the historical and topical study of art and its relationship to culture and society. This course incorporates the extensive use of visual materials to teach the essentials and aesthetics of art, civilization, and daily life. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART101 Art Appreciation (CONSORTIUM) (3 credits)
Consortium from Iowa Lakes Community College

ART110 Art Structure (3 credits)
Art Structure is an introductory studio course for all students. It is designed to acquaint the student with the materials and techniques of the visual artist, principles of design, basic color theory, creativity, and the artistic process. Students will explore and produce works in various traditional and contemporary media of the visual arts. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART115 Three Dimensional Design (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to creating art in three dimensions. It is designed to acquaint students with traditional and non-traditional 3D materials, techniques and concepts. Students will learn about the elements and principles of composition in three dimensions and the various ways this art can be used as a tool for aesthetic and conceptual understanding. Students will apply their understanding of these concepts through hands-on studio work as well as through evaluation and analysis in critiques and class discussions. (Prerequisite: none.) (MNTC 6: The Humanities--The Arts, Literature and Philosophy)

ART120 Metal Art (3 credits)
This course introduces you to the creative process of metal arts. You will use a variety of materials and will work with both traditional and contemporary methods of metal fabrication. Designs will initially be art ideas which will be articulated through a traditional mode of drawing before articulated into a metal form. Primary Assemblage methods include Brazing, Welding, Cutting, Fabricating, Finishing, and Patina; Primary Materials include a variety of steel, brass/bronze, aluminum, and found objects. Lectures and critiques include some historical, cultural, and environmental issues of public sculpture. The emphasis on art ideas as they relate to form, space, and time. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART125 Sculpture (3 credits)
Sculpture will introduce students to the basic concepts, techniques, materials and methods used to create three-dimensional objects, installations and site-specific works. Students will explore three-dimensional form, and space while experimenting with fabrication, assemblage and carving techniques. Students will learn basic principles of design as they relate to sculpture and the three-dimensional environment. Extra learner supplies required. (Prerequisites: ART 110) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART130 Painting (3 credits)
Painting is an introductory studio course in the elements of traditional and contemporary oil painting. Students will explore and discuss the various techniques and methods basic to the creation of paintings. Students will participate in the discussions and critiques of traditional and contemporary paintings and explore the creative process via the medium of oil paint. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART135 Introduction to Watercolor (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to Watercolor and the various ways it can be used as a creative tool for aesthetic and conceptual understanding. Students will expand their skills in compositional design through the study and practice of the Elements of Art and the Principles of Organization: Line, Shape, Texture, Value, Color, Space, Balance, Emphasis, Rhythm, Scale/Proportion and Unity. Also examined and practiced in class are the painting techniques of watercolor, including the preservation of whites, transparencies, bleeds, dropping color, wet on wet technique, drybrush and lifting. Through lectures and visual references, historical and contemporary examples of watercolor will be explored and analyzed to expand students understanding of fine art and their own work within this context. In addition, students will learn how to discuss, analyze and evaluate their own work as well as the work of their peers, through class discussions and critiques. Additional learner supplies will be required for this course. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART140 Digital Photography (3 credits)
Introduction to the conceptual, technical and historical aspects of photography as a creative medium using digital technology within the fine arts context. Students study camera operation and techniques, composition and design, digital image capture, related software, and digital output. This class also utilizes the computer as a digital darkroom to enhance photographic images. Projects provide students with an understanding of how photographs function, not only technically, but also visually and conceptually. Students must have a digital camera; (variable F. Stop, and shutter recommended) Textbook and other supplies will also be required. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART145 Mixed-Media (3 credits)
This course engages students in a three-dimensional art making experience that draws from a variety of studio practices. Students will participate in artistic endeavors involving traditional and non-traditional materials, techniques and concepts. Emphasis is placed upon the development of aesthetic, conceptual and technical skills to further personal artistic evolution. (Prerequisite: none.) (MNTC 6: The Humanities--The Arts, Literature and Philosophy)

ART150 Drawing I (3 credits)
This drawing course will further the students' understanding of the core elements of drawing: line, composition, perspective, proportion, texture, value, and shading. These drawing elements will be taught through both traditional and modern methods. The course will also include several short lectures to give examples of the work, and to expand art appreciation. There will be a strong emphasis on the student's ability to critique their own work along with their peers. The dialogue within the classroom will help to expand the student's skills and process. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART155 Visual Narrative (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of visual narrative and the various ways it can be used as a tool for aesthetic and conceptual expression. Students will expand their knowledge of storytelling in artistic practice by examining compositional design, symbolic imagery and sequential image making. While studying the methodology of narrative, students will create their own storyboard layout in preparation for a final, refined visual narrative presentation in the student's format of choice, (film/video, graphic novel, drawings/paintings, etc.) In addition, this course will also explore visual narratives from cultures that are not mainstream American culture. Included in this examination is the study of non-linear and multi-linear formats. Through the investigation of traditional and non-traditional visual narrative, students will be provided with the tools to express their own voice with new insight and perspective. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 7: Humanities and Fine Arts, Human Diversity)

ART165 Public Art (3 credits)
Public Art is a painting course focused on the creation of art through painting a large-scale mural. Students will work collaboratively to complete the site-specific work while developing and refining their painting and drawing skills. Through lectures and presentations, historical and contemporary examples of mural painting will be explored, giving students a sound basis for understanding the significance of murals in the historical and global context. Students will hone drawing skills while transferring the design onto the wall surface, learn to mix colors and to adapt painting techniques to the use of exterior latex paint. Students will also learn to work cooperatively with others on the completion of the project, and to align their work with one another in order to develop a cohesive single painting. They will critique the work on a weekly basis as the project progresses, keeping journals of their experience and using photographic documentation as a means of analyzing technical development. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART170 Digital Video Production (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of digital video production. Students will learn how to produce digital video productions utilizing story-boarding, lighting and shooting techniques. Students will use video and audio editing software to import, assemble and edit clips, add transitions, create super-impositions and titles in finished video productions. In addition, they will learn hardware set-up, capturing techniques and video compression schemes as they output their work to various video formats. The course also examines the history and application of video in contemporary art, documentary, film and television production. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART180 Digital Video Production (3 credits)
This course will introduce the student to both the practical and theoretical application of controlling the digital photographer's most important tool, light. The course will deal with, through the use of light modifying devices and software, how to control the direction, quantity, quality, ratio and color of light for both outdoor (natural) and indoor (existing) light. Students enrolled in this course will study advanced lighting techniques, contemporary practices and theories in digital photography. Students will work with intermediate and advanced digital imaging software. This course will emphasize the student's development of individual artistic voice applied in a portfolio of digital photographic images. Students enrolling in this course are required to supply their own digital camera, tripod, image editing software, and lighting equipment as specified in the course syllabus. Image editing software will also be available for use in the open computer lab at South Central College's North Mankato campus. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART201 Art History I (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of visual culture from prehistory through the Middle Ages, including art and architecture from both Western and non-Western cultures. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

ART202 Art History II (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of visual culture, including art and architecture, from the Middle Ages to the present time.(Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

ART240 Digital Photography 2 (3 credits)
This course will introduce the student to both the practical and theoretical application of controlling the digital photographer's most important tool, light. The course will deal with, through the use of light modifying devices and software, how to control the direction, quantity, quality, ratio and color of light for both outdoor (natural) and indoor (existing) light. Students enrolled in this course will study advanced lighting techniques, contemporary practices and theories in digital photography. Students will work with intermediate and advanced digital imaging software. This course will emphasize the student's development of individual artistic voice applied in a portfolio of digital photographic images. Students enrolling in this course are required to supply their own digital camera, tripod, image editing software, and lighting equipment as specified in the course syllabus. Image editing software will also be available for use in the open computer lab at South Central College's North Mankato campus. (Prerequisite: ART 140 or instructor approval) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART250 Drawing II (3 credits)
This course builds upon the concepts of Drawing I (ART 150). Students will further their understanding of drawing issues by creating artwork that explores process, personal imagery, formal analysis, and conceptual goals. Historical and contemporary models will continue to be explored and discussed relative to the students' own artwork. (Prerequisite: ART 150) (MNTC 6: The Humanities--The Arts, Literature and Philosophy)

ART270 Digital Video Production 2 (3 credits)
This course covers advanced digital video techniques including scripting, lighting, shooting, editing and the overall video/audio production sequence. Students will develop advanced skills for any profession that involves video production such as television, documentation, filmmaking, contemporary art, web design, multimedia communication, animation and computer gaming. Students will use advanced non-linear video and audio editing software. Final project is a video series or single production of substantial length within the field of artistic, commercial and/or documentary video. Students will examine and utilize advanced application of cinematic philosophy, production techniques and technologies in the fields of film, videography, documentary production, and multimedia. This course also covers the current visual culture and how it applies to a digital cinematic/video production. Students will participate as a member of a production crew on college productions when available. (Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in ART 170 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ASL - American Sign Language

ASL101 American Sign Language 1 (3 credits)
This course teaches the basics of American Sign Language. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 7: Human Diversity)

AST - Auto Service Technology

AST1112 Introduction to Auto Service (2 credits)
This course is a requirement for the Automotive Service program. The course includes the following topics: shop safety, shop practices and procedures, vehicle identification, use of electronic service information, proper use of hand tools, power tools, hoists and other shop equipment, fasteners, tires, and fluids. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service program)

AST1121 Service Management (1 credits)
This course is designed for individuals who will be responsible for the operation of an automotive repair facility. It provides instruction in customer service, parts and service marketing, shop management, and business ethics in the automotive repair field. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST1130 Introduction to Hybrid Electric Vehicles (1 credits)
The course introduces the fundamentals of hybrid electric vehicles. The course includes hybrid vehicle classifications, high voltage safety, vehicle systems, components, operation, and basic diagnosis. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service Program).

AST1212 Basic Electrical (2 credits)
This course covers the fundamentals of electricity. The battery, DC electrical circuits, circuit components, wiring diagrams, digital multimeter use, Ohm's law, Watt's law, and circuit testing will be presented in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service program)

AST1222 Advanced Electrical/Electronics (2 credits)
This course covers the operation and diagnosis of relays, motors, lighting systems, gauges, windshield wiper systems, power windows, power locks, solid state electronic components, and other automotive electrical systems. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST1212 is recommended for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service program)

AST1233 Starting and Charging Systems (3 credits)
This course covers the operation and diagnosis of the starting and charging systems. Instruction in component identification and operation, circuit diagnosis, and component testing will be included. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service Program)

AST1311 Engine Diagnosis (1 credits)
This course covers engine diagnosis using various types of test equipment. This course focuses on developing the skills needed to diagnose and analyze basic engine problems. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST 1712 is required for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST1323 Lower Engine Service (3 credits)
This course covers the theory of engine operation and construction, parts identification, measurements, and engine wear locations. Determining the service procedures an engine will require and the reconditioning of all lower engine components are included in this course. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST 1311 is required for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST1332 Upper Engine Service (2 credits)
This course covers testing and rebuilding the cylinder head. The student will analyze cylinder compression and leakage to determine if valve and valve seat service is necessary. Hands-on experience consists of valve refacing, valve guide service, valve seat reconditioning, valve spring testing, shim selection, and proper assembly and installation. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST 1311 is required for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST1341 Engine Lab (1 credits)
This course is designed to allow students enrolled in the engine services sequence of courses, time to complete the assigned projects. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST 1323 and AST 1332 is required for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST1412 Clutch & Drive Line (2 credits)
This course covers standard automotive and light truck clutches. Content includes design, adjustment, overhaul, diagnosis, and repair. Also included are mechanical and hydraulic systems. The drive line section includes phasing, alignment and balance. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST1112 or instructor approval)

AST1423 Manual Transmission/Transaxle & 4X4 (3 credits)
This course covers the operation and the proper repair procedures for the types of manual transmissions/transaxles and transfer cases used in late model vehicles. Four wheel drive, locking hubs, axle disconnects, AWD, full-time, and part-time four-wheel drive systems will also be covered. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST1112 or instructor approval)

AST1513 Suspension/Steering & Wheel Alignment (3 credits)
This course covers front and rear suspension systems, wheel balance, and steering systems and components. Students will be required to perform a front and rear wheel alignment. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST1112 or instructor approval)

AST1613 Brakes (3 credits)
This course will cover the principles of friction and braking systems, disc and drum brakes, parking brakes, and power assist units. Emphasis will be placed on system operation, diagnosis, repair, and maintenance of various types of braking systems. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST1112 or instructor approval)

AST1622 Advanced Brakes (2 credits)
This course will cover anti-lock brake systems. Emphasis will be placed on system operation and controls. Diagnosis, repair, and maintenance of the various types of systems will also be included. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST1112 or instructor approval)

AST1712 Basic Tune-up (Non-computer) (2 credits)
This course covers the theory and principles of operation of automotive gasoline engines, fuel systems, ignition systems, and emission systems. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST 1212 is required for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST1714 Introduction to Engine Operation (2 credits)
This course covers the theory of operation, basic diagnosis, and maintenance of the automotive gasoline engine, fuel system, ignition system, and emission system. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST1212 is recommended for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service program)

AST2432 Rear Axle/Differential (2 credits)
This course will cover the operation and proper repair procedures of current differentials used on late model vehicles. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST1112 or instructor approval)

AST2442 Automatic Transmission I (2 credits)
This course covers how an automatic transmission works, the basic parts, functions, and power flow of the hydraulic circuits. This course also includes the basic theory of torque converters, planetary gears, clutches, bands, and hydraulic circuit operation. Prior knowledge gained by successful completion of AST 1112 is required for student success in this class. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST2452 Automatic Transmission II (2 credits)
This course is a hands-on lab class in which various transmissions and transaxles are overhauled, adjusted, and bench tested. Basic overhaul techniques and special tool and gauge usage are included. Prior knowledge gained by successful completion of AST 1112 and AST 2442 is required for student success in this class. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST2462 Automatic Transmission III (2 credits)
The student, after completing this course, will have a basic understanding of troubleshooting, repairs, and adjustments of conventional and electronic shift automatic transmissions. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST1112 or instructor approval)

AST2723 Fuel Systems I (3 credits)
This course covers the principles of operation of the various types of automotive fuel systems. Fuel system component identification, operation, and testing is included in this course. Gasoline fuel system diagnosis and repair will be emphasized. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST2733 Introduction to Automotive Computers (3 credits)
This course covers the operating principles and testing of automotive computers, sensors, and control devices. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service program)

AST2743 Fuel Systems II (3 credits)
This course covers fuel injection and emissions systems used with gasoline engines. This course focuses on the operation, diagnosis, and repair of automotive fuel injection and emissions systems. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service program)

AST2752 Engine Performance & Drivability (2 credits)
This course emphasizes the accurate and efficient diagnosis and repair of drivability and emission concerns associated with all aspects of engine operation. Particular attention will be placed on computerized engine management systems. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST2812 Basic Air Conditioning (2 credits)
This course covers the principles of air conditioning. Various system types, malfunction diagnosis, testing, and repair are studied in the classroom. Practical work such as component replacement, charging, and performance testing will be on actual systems. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST1112 or instructor approval)

AST2822 Advanced Heating and Air Conditioning (2 credits)
This course covers automatic temperature control systems operation, testing and repairs of vacuum and electrical controls, air flow distribution, and heater system controls. (Prerequisites: Admission into the Automotive Service program and AST 2812 or instructor approval)

AST2911 Auto Lab I (1 credits)
This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop practical automotive repair skills. Auto Lab provides the student shop time to complete projects and lab assignments required in the Automotive Service program. This is a hands-on, performance based course where students work on diagnosing, maintaining and repairing vehicles. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST 1112 or concurrent enrollment in AST 1112 is required for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST2921 Auto Lab II (1 credits)
This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop practical automotive repair skills. Auto Lab provides shop time to complete projects required in the Automotive Service program. This is a hands-on, performance based course where students work on diagnosing, maintaining and repairing vehicles. (Prerequisite: Admission to the Automotive Service Program)

AST2931 Auto Lab III (1 credits)
This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop practical automotive repair skills. Auto Lab provides the student shop time to complete projects required in the Automotive Service program. This is a hands-on, performance based course where students work on diagnosing, maintaining and repairing vehicles. Prior knowledge gained by successful completion of AST 1112 is required for student success in this class. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST2941 Auto Lab IV (1 credits)
This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop practical automotive repair skills. Auto Lab provides the student shop time to complete projects and lab assignments required in the Automotive Service program. This is a hands-on, performance based course where students work on diagnosing, maintaining and repairing vehicles. Prior knowledge gained by the successful completion of AST 1112 or concurrent enrollment in AST 1112 is required for student success in this course. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Automotive Service program)

AST2951 Individualized Study (1 - 8 credits)
This course allows the student to design a program of study geared toward individual need and special interest. The student will specialize in developing skills and competencies in selected areas. (Prerequisites: Instructor approval)

AST2961 Cooperative Occupational Experience (1 - 8 credits)
Students will work in a sponsoring automotive service facility. The tasks and activities must be consistent with prior course work. The work schedule will be determined on a case-by-case basis. (Prerequisites: The student must be in the second year of the program and instructor approval is required. Credits are variable up to a maximum of 8)

BDET - Architectural Drafting & Design

BDET1100 Introduction to Building Design and Energy Technology (1 credits)
Overview of academic preparation and career opportunities in the field of: Architectural, Mechanical-Electrical-Plumbing (MEP), structural, building design and energy technology. (Prerequisite: None)

BDET1110 Studio I (4 credits)
This is an introductory studio course for students interested in Building Design and Energy Technology. Studio I includes a combination of sketching and electronic drawing software applications. This course will cover, sketching techniques, dimensions, notations, organization, and measuring. This class advances into drawing a commercial wood-frame construction project while incorporating electronic drawing software into the design process. (Prerequisite: None)

BDET1120 Estimating Concepts (2 credits)
This course covers principles of quantity takeoffs, identification of symbols, and computation of materials from a set of commercial construction working drawings utilizing the CSI divisions. (Prerequisite: None)

BDET1130 Materials and Methods (3 credits)
The basic construction methods and materials used in building technologies are examined. Common building materials such as wood, masonry, concrete, and metals will be analyzed as it relates to commercial applications. The classification of materials and project delivery systems; application of principles of building science to construction sites; relationship between technology and sustainability will be addressed. (Prerequisite: None)

BDET1150 AutoCAD (2 credits)
This is an introductory 2D computer-aided drafting course that takes a practical hands-on approach to the use, operations, and methods of AutoCAD. It includes the following: drafting, line types, line widths, accuracy, and dimensioning, editing, drawing setup, scaling, and plotting. (Prerequisite: None)

BDET1210 Studio II (4 credits)
This course covers the materials, methods, and construction principles of a commercial project. Electronic drawing software and hand drawing will be utilized. Independent work, critical thinking, problem solving, and application are emphasized. A set of working drawings will be drawn incorporating construction documents. (Prerequisites: BDET 1110, 1150)

BDET1220 Building Analyst (3 credits)
This course will provide an understanding of technical standards for home performance and weatherization retrofit. The course will provide an introduction to building performance as it relates to the residential sector. The student will be introduced to the building shell components, combustion zone and blower door testing. In addition, the student will be aware of the auditing process and customer relations. This course will follow the Building Performance Institute (BPI) standards and content for building analyst and envelop professional. (Prerequisites: BDET 1110, 1130)

BDET1230 Materials and Methods II (3 credits)
Construction methods and materials utilized in building technologies will be examined in detail. Building materials such as wood, masonry, concrete, and metals will be analyzed as it relates to commercial applications. This application will be by a single building material and/or as an assembly (e.g. wall section). The classification of materials and project delivery systems; application of principles of building science to construction sites; relationship between technology and sustainability will also be addressed. (Prerequisites: BDET 1130)

BDET1240 Construction Documents (2 credits)
This course provides an overview of construction documents including working drawings, specifications, and other contract documents. Emphasis on the development of project manual, legal and ethical aspects, and divisions of work. (Prerequisites: BDET 1110)

BDET1250 Revit (2 credits)
This is an introductory 3D computer-aided course that takes a practical hands-on approach to the use, operations, and methods of Revit. It includes the following: detailing and drafting views, construction documentation, and the basics of building modeling. (Prerequisites: BDET 1110, 1150)

BDET1260 Special Topics in Environmental Design (1 credits)
This course will provide an understanding of addressing surrounding environmental parameters. These parameters may result when devising plans, programs, policies, buildings or products. The course will also provide an introduction to the human-designed environment. This introduction will relate to interdisciplinary areas such as architecture, urban planning, and product design and sustainability issues. (Prerequisite: BDET 1110)

BDET1320 Internship (3 credits)
This course covers applying classroom knowledge to the workplace. Students are responsible for finding an appropriate program related job. Course requirements will be adapted to the type of work performed by the student. (Prerequisites: BDET 2210, Advisor approval)

BDET2110 Studio III (4 credits)
Building Information Modeling (BIM) will be incorporated. Construction methods & materials, LEED principles, design process, preparation of details, research, and incorporation of applicable codes and ordinances shall be major factors in developing this coordinated set of working drawings. The International Building Code (IBC) and the American Disability Act (ADA) will be determining factors in this commercial project. This class will continue to further the students knowledge of construction, materials, and applications of various architectural and engineering design principles. (Prerequisites: BDET 1210)

BDET2120 Statics and Strengths of Materials (3 credits)
This course covers an introduction to structural theory and calculation. It includes analysis of forces, vectors, calculations of forces, moments and internal stresses and strains in structural materials. It also includes tracing of load paths through the structure. (Prerequisites: MATH 125, BDET 1210)

BDET2130 MEP Systems (Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing) (3 credits)
This course provides students with a fundamental knowledge of Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing systems. HVAC, lighting, plumbing, and communication systems will be analyzed in reference to their impact on commercial design, space planning, construction cost, and sustainable design. (Prerequisites BDET 1210)

BDET2140 Building Codes (2 credits)
The course will involve the current International Building Code (IBC), Chapter 1341 Minnesota Accessibility Code, International Residential Code, and Minnesota Energy Code. This class will address the understanding of the building codes as they relate to the residential and commercial sector. (Prerequisite: BDET 1210)

BDET2150 Revit II (3 credits)
This course enables students to expand their knowledge in setting up office standards with templates that include annotation styles, preset views, sheets and schedules as well as creating custom systems, in-place and component families. (Prerequisite: BDET 1250)

BDET2210 Studio IV (6 credits)
This capstone course will advance the students knowledge of commercial building design. Building Information Modeling (BIM) will be incorporated. CAD skills, construction methods & materials, preparation of details, research, and incorporation of applicable codes and ordinances shall be major factors in developing this coordinated set of working drawings. The International Building Code (IBC) and the American Disability Act (ADA) will be determining factors in this commercial project. This class will continue to further the students knowledge of construction, materials, and applications of architectural and engineering disciplines as they pertain to the construction of a commercial project. (Prerequisites: BDET 2110)

BIOL - Biology

BIOL100 Introduction to Biology (4 credits)
Introduction to Biology familiarizes students with fundamental biological principles and processes occurring within our natural world. This course engages students in the methodology and practice of scientific investigation, and emphasizes molecular and cellular processes, systems of the human body, and human impact on the environment. Discussions of organisms are framed by the sciences of ecology and evolution with a focus on the relationship between biological structure and function. Lecture and a 2 hour lab are included. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL101 Introduction to Ecology (4 credits)
Introduction to Ecology introduces the student to fundamental principles of ecology while focusing on interactions occurring at all of its levels. Students will become familiar with interrelationships between biotic and abiotic components of the natural world, investigate population, community, and ecosystem structures and dynamics, and gain knowledge of human impact on the environment. Lecture and a 3 hour lab are included. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3, 10: Natural Sciences, People and the Environment)

BIOL106 Introduction to Cell Biology (3 credits)
This is an introductory cell biology course dealing with: the cell structure and organelles; basic chemistry and biochemical molecules; cell transport and energy concepts; cellular respiration; cell reproduction; patterns of inheritance; structure and function of DNA; how genes are controlled; DNA technology. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL110 Biology of Disease (3 credits)
This course is a survey of human disease including physiological and infectious diseases. Possible topics include infectious diseases, cancer, heart disease, disorders of the immune system, diabetes, etc. Prevention of disease through control of risk factors and early detection will be covered. Diagnosis and treatment will also be addressed. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL115 General Biology I (4 credits)
This course covers biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. It serves as an introduction to macromolecules and metabolism, cell biology, Mendelian genetics, and gene expression. This course involves a weekly three hour lab. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher AND Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 237 or Classic Accuplacer College Level Math score of 50 or higher or either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC Area 3)

BIOL116 General Biology II (4 credits)
This course covers biology at the organismal, population and system level. It will emphasize organismal diversity, population and community ecology and ecosystems. Students will gain an understanding of how evolutionary advances have occurred among populations due to natural selection. This course involves a weekly three hour lab. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer score of 250 or above, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a C (2.0) or higher or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher AND a Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 237 or higher or Classic Accuplacer College Level Math score of 50 or higher, or either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC area 3)

BIOL152 Tropical Rain Forest Ecology (4 credits)
Tropical Rain Forest Ecology introduces students to fundamental ecological concepts, processes and dynamics within the tropical rain forest biome. Discussions of flora and fauna will be framed within the context of evolution with an emphasis on adaptations. A special focus will be made on the rain forests and culture of Costa Rica and the Galapagos Islands. This course includes a one-week study abroad to Costa Rica or the Galapagos Islands. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3, 10: Natural Sciences, People and the Environment)

BIOL162 Human Biology (4 credits)
This one-semester course is an introduction to the biology of the human body. Basic form and function of the body systems and their interactions will be emphasized. Other topics include: terminology, basic chemistry, cell biology genetics, molecular biology and nutrition as it relates to the human body. This course contains a laboratory portion. (Minnesota Transfer Curriculum goal area 3) (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL211 Genetics (4 credits)
This is an introductory Genetics course which covers the study of biologically inherited traits. It will emphasize Medelian genetics as well as molecular genetics. Students will explore classical, population, and molecular genetics. Students will learn genetics through lecture, solving genetics problems, and demonstrating concepts from lecture through laboratory experimentation. (Prerequisites: BIOL 115. BIOL 116 is strongly recommended) (MNTC Goal Area 3)

BIOL215 General Ecology (4 credits)
This course examines interrelationships between organisms and their environment, with an emphasis on population, community and ecosystem dynamics. Ecological research methods are applied through hands-on activities in lab and in the field. While basic ecology is the focus, relationships between ecological research and current environmental issues will also be addressed. This course includes outdoor data collection and off-campus field trips. MNTC Goal Areas 3 and 10. (Prerequisites: BIOL 116)

BIOL220 Human Anatomy (4 credits)
This course takes an in-depth look at the anatomy of the human body systems. The course emphasizes structure and anatomical function at the cellular, tissue, organ and systemic level. Dysfunctions are included but the body in homeostasis is emphasized. This course includes a weekly three hour lab. Some labs include dissection. (Prerequisite: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 78 or higher or completion of either READ0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C or better or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher, or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Area 3)

BIOL225 Anatomy and Physiology I (4 credits)
Anatomy and Physiology I is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body under normal and abnormal conditions. It is the first in a two course series. It will cover tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, and muscular systems, articulations, nervous tissue, spinal cord and nerves, brain and cranial nerves, anatomy of the heart, blood vessels and circulation and the lymphatic structures. It will also cover cellular biology, cellular transport, cell respiration, cell reproduction and basic review of biochemistry as it relates to the human body. This course contains a laboratory component which includes dissection. For Biology majors, please see BIOL 220 Anatomy and BIOL 230 Physiology. (Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL230 Human Physiology (4 credits)
This course provides an in-depth study of the functioning of most body systems, including muscle, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and endocrine systems at both the cellular and systemic level. An emphasis is placed on normal physiology, but dysfunction will also be discussed. This course contains a weekly 3 hour laboratory component. (Prerequisites: BIOL 220 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 108, CHEM 110 or CHEM 120 with a grade of C or better) (MNTC Goal Area 3)

BIOL235 Anatomy and Physiology II (4 credits)
Anatomy and Physiology II is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body under normal and abnormal conditions. It is the second in a two course series. It will cover the autonomic, endocrine, immune, respiratory, digestive urinary and reproductive systems. It will also cover fluid electrolyte, acid-base balance, blood, blood pressure regulation and functional characteristics of the heart, special senses, development and inheritance. This course also has a lab component in which students will perform hands on activities to reinforce some of the material taught in lecture. For Biology majors, please see BIOL 220 Anatomy and BIOL 230 Physiology. (Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 225 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL240 Pathophysiology (3 credits)
This course provides an in-depth study of the chemical, biological and psychological process involved with alterations of health, using systemic and non-systemic approaches. Besides the two hour lecture, this course meets one additional hour to work on case studies. (Prerequisite: BIOL 230 or 235) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL250 Biology Capstone (2 credits)
Biology Capstone is a course that is required before completion of an AS degree in Biology. It is a project based course in which students will demonstrate a culmination of the skills developed while at South Central College. The student enrolled in this course will complete a scientific research project and present the findings by writing a research paper and giving a poster presentation. In addition, students may be required to participate in all assessment activities as directed by the instructor and the Biology program. This course should be taken during the last semester before completion of an A.S. degree in Biology. (Prerequisite: Instructor permission)

BIOL270 Microbiology (4 credits)
This course is an introduction to the general principles and methods used in the study of microorganisms. It includes a survey of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms emphasizing bacteria and viruses. Topics include microbial cell structure and function, metabolism, microbial genetics, and the role of microorganisms in disease, immunity and other selected applied areas. Laboratory techniques include isolating, culturing and identifying microorganisms. This course contains a three hour per week laboratory component. (Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in BIOL115 OR BIOL225 OR BIOL220 AND CHEM108 OR CHEM110) (MNTC Goal Area 3)

CAP - Capstone

CAP250 Associate of Arts Capstone Class (1 credits)
This course should be taken by students seeking the Associates of Arts degree during their final semester at SCC. It assesses fulfillment of the program's Learning Outcomes (Communication, Critical Thinking, Research Proficiency, Global Perspective and Social Responsibility), and allows students to demonstrate their readiness to take junior-level classes at a four-year institution. (Prerequisite: Unless instructor grants special permission, students must be in their last semester of the Associate in Arts program at SCC) (MNTC 2: Critical Thinking)

CARP - Carpentry

CARP1110 Carpentry Tools and Safety (2 credits)
The course covers the safe operations of carpentry tools in the construction industry. Hand tools and stationary power tools will be covered. Job site safety, scaffolding, and ladders will be covered in depth. (Prerequisite: Declare Carpentry as a major)

CARP1121 Print Reading (2 credits)
This course will be an introduction to Residential Blue Print reading as well as Light Commercial Blue Print reading. Symbols, plans, details, and diagrams will be addressed along with other trades and their connections to the carpentry field. Each student will be required to read text assignments, answer questions from workbook and participate in classroom discussion and presentations. Different print types will be used in the instruction of materials as students look for specific details and answers to real life problems that arise on the job site. (Prerequisites: Declared major as carpentry)

CARP1123 Residential Principles I (5 credits)
This course will cover the initial framing of a residential building project. It may involve an addition or remodeling an existing residence. Students will construct basement bearing walls, knee walls, well openings, posts, and beams. Students will install the sill, sill seal, rim joists, floor framing, floor plywood, and wall construction. All types of floor systems and wall framing techniques will be covered and implemented where applicable. (Prerequisite: Declare Carpentry as a major)

CARP1130 Residential Principles II (5 credits)
This course will continue the residential building project started in Residential Principles I. Students will do layout for roof trusses, ceiling joists, or rafters. The roof will be installed on the residential project to match the existing structure according to building points. All types of roof construction and roof framing will be analyzed, discussed, and implemented where applicable. Roof plywood, roof edge, ice and water guard, along with tar paper, will be installed. Students will shingle and flash the roof according to manufacturer's recommendations and local building codes. Window installation on the project will also be completed in the course. (Corequisite: CARP 1123)

CARP1210 Introduction to Cabinetmaking (3 credits)
This course is designed to give students an understanding of kitchen design, cabinet sizes when purchasing factory cabinets and the importance of knowing appliance sizes. Students will read cabinet blueprints, build face frames and cabinet boxes. Students will use these new skills and build a base cabinet and upper cabinet. These skills could be incorporated into any number of larger cabinet projects. (Prerequisites: CARP 1110; CARP 1121; Carpentry as a major)

CARP1221 Commercial Print Reading (2 credits)
Commercial Blueprint Reading will get students into reading basic commercial blueprints. Students will study commercial plans and working drawings. (Prerequisite CARP 1110; CARP 1121; CARP 1130; Carpentry as a major)

CARP1226 Stairway Technology (2 credits)
This course covers all the aspects of stairway installation in residential construction. Students will learn the many code requirements involved with stairways. Students will layout, cut, and install a set of stairs. Stairs will also be constructed on the class residential building project. These stairways may be installed in the residence, off decks, or in the main entry. Skirt board, treads, risers, and handrails will be installed to finish a stairway to meet code requirements. (Prerequisites: CARP 1110; CARP 1121;CARP 2023)

CARP1229 Exterior Finish (2 credits)
This course covers the exterior finish of the student build residential project. This includes soffit and fascia, door and window trim, flashing, starter, corner boards, and siding. Many different types of siding will be discussed and studied from our text book and real world examples. Deck or patio construction would be completed at this time as well. (Prerequisites: CARP 1110)

CARP1232 Carpentry Lab (2 credits)
Carpentry Lab will encompass a wide variety of projects in the shop. The students could be involved in the construction of a fish house, yard shed, play house, or other construction project deemed appropriate for the course by the instructor. This lab time may also be used for extra practice or refresher on new skills learned. This may involve wall framing, rafter layout, door hanging, and trim practice. If time allows, students may be introduced to cabinet construction. (Prerequisite: CARP 1110)

CARP1239 Interior Finish (4 credits)
This course is the completion of the inside of the residential building project constructed in earlier classes. This course covers the installation of doors, casing, window trim, and base. Students will install cabinets, counter tops, and all the details to finish a kitchen. This may include crown mold, base shoe, toe kick, and flooring. Students will also be involved in the finishing of closets, shelving, door bumpers, and door knobs. (Prerequisite CARP 1110; CARP 1130)

CARP2023 Advanced Principles I (4 credits)
Students will be constructing a house from the ground up. Students will be staking out a residential building project and assisting the excavator. Students will build and pour footings and the foundation. Students will continue building basement walls, Installing floor joists, erecting exterior and interior walls, and sheathing walls. (Prerequisites CARP 1110; CARP 1121; CARP 1130)

CARP2030 Advanced Principles II (5 credits)
Advanced Principles II is the continuation of the house project. Trusses will be set, the roof sheathed and shingled. Windows and doors will be installed along with house wrap. Students will be insulating the house and installing drywall. This is a big part of the program and all students will be expected to work as a team. (Prerequisites: CARP 1110; CARP 1121)

CARP2032 OSHA 30 For Construction (2 credits)
Students will be required to take our OSHA 30 class. Upon completion of the course this will give students their OSHA 30 card for construction. Many employers require employees to have this card to work on particular jobs.

CARP2100 Foundations and Footings (3 credits)
This course covers site preparation for a residence which involves property lines, setbacks, and compliance with local city or county ordinances. Students will stake out a house and assist in excavation while the hole for the house is dug. Many types and designs of foundations and footings will be discussed. Appropriate foundations and footings will then be formed and poured by the students. (Prerequisite: CARP 1130)

CARP2101 Commercial Construction Concepts (2 credits)
This course will be an exploration for carpenters into commercial construction. Students will build steel studded walls, hang steel door frames, and study other forms of commercial construction. Tours will be set up for students to visit commercial job sites and have the opportunity to compare the different types of construction. (Prerequisite: CARP 1130; CARP 2023)

CARP2103 Residential Roof Framing (2 credits)
This course covers the roof framing of the student-built home. Students will study many aspects of roof framing with varying techniques of residential construction. (Prerequisites: CARP 1110; CARP 1121; CARP 1130)

CARP2105 Job Site Experience (5 credits)
This course is the culmination of the second year project. Students will do a number of things to complete the house including patios, decks, sidewalks, garage doors and some finished floor installation. Students will also facilitate the return of tools and equipment back to college and lumber yard. The yard will be readied with appropriate landscape and the house will need to pass a final inspection. (Prerequisites CARP 2023; CARP 2030)

CARP2129 Advanced Exterior Finish (3 credits)
Second year students will apply exterior trim and siding to the house project. (Prerequisites CARP 1110; CARP 2023)

CARP2139 Advanced Interior Finish (4 credits)
Second year students will trim out the house project. Students will gain experience hanging doors, trimming windows, installing base and finishing the house. (Prerequisites CARP 1110; CARP 2030)

CDEV - Child Development

CDEV1210 Child Growth and Development (3 credits)
This course is the first in a series of courses that is required for a certificate, diploma, or degree in Child Development Careers. The course provides an overview of typical and atypical child development across cultures, from prenatal through school age. It includes physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive, aesthetic, and identity/individual development. This course integrates developmental theory with appropriate practices in a variety of early childhood care and educational settings. (Prerequisites: None)

CDEV1220 Health, Safety & Nutrition (3 credits)
This course will guide the student in obtaining skills needed to establish and maintain a physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environment for young children. Topics include preventing illness and accidents, handling emergencies, providing health, safety, and nutrition educational experiences, meeting children's basic nutritional needs, child abuse and, current health-related issues. This course does NOT include CPR or first aid certification. (Prerequisites: None)

CDEV1230 Guiding Children's Behavior (3 credits)
This course examines positive child guidance techniques for individual and group situations. Emphasis on problem prevention and positive guidance strategies, communication, setting limits, problem solving and behavior modification. Examines ways to establish supportive relationships with children and guide them in order to enhance learning, development, and well-being. (Prerequisites: None)

CDEV1240 Working with Diverse Families and Children (3 credits)
Examines how to work with many types of families. Investigates the importance of the family/school partnership, study methods of effectively communicating with families, and identify community organizations and networks that support families. Various classroom strategies will be explored emphasizing culturally and linguistically appropriate anti-bias approaches supporting all children in becoming competent members of a diverse society. (Prerequisites: None)

CDEV1260 Observation and Assessment 1 (1 credits)
This course introduces students to the most common observation methods used in early childhood programs. It will explore the fundamentals of using observation and evaluation techniques. (Prerequisites: None)

CDEV1270 Learning Environment & Curriculum (3 credits)
This course presents an overview of skills to provide appropriate learning environments for young children. It examines the role of the teacher in providing learning experiences to meet each child's needs, capabilities, and interests, and ways to implement the principles of developmentally appropriate practices. (Prerequisite: None)

CDEV1310 Infant-Toddler Development and Learning Experiences (3 credits)
This course will examine infant and toddler development as it applies to early childhood educational settings. Students will integrate strategies that support diversity and anti-bias perspectives, analyze development, correlate prenatal conditions with development, summarize child development theories, analyze the role of heredity and the environment, examine research-based curriculum models, and examine culturally and developmentally appropriate environments for infants and toddlers. (Prerequisite: CDEV 1210)

CDEV1312 Preschool Development and Learning Experiences (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of preschool theory and development in home or center-based settings. Students will integrate knowledge of developmental needs, developmentally appropriate environments, effective caregiving, teaching strategies, and observation methods. (Prerequisite: CDEV 1210)

CDEV2210 Observation and Assessment 2 (2 credits)
This course focuses on the appropriate use of assessment and observation strategies to document development, growth, play and learning to join with families and professionals in promoting children's success. Recording strategies, rating systems, multiple assessment tools and portfolios are explored. There will be a focus on increasing objectivity in observing and interpreting children's behavior, observing developmental characteristics and increasing the awareness of normal patterns of behavior. (Prerequisite: CDEV 1260)

CDEV2310 Children with Differing Abilities (3 credits)
This course examines the development of children with differing abilities. Students will integrate strategies that support diversity and anti-bias perspectives, providing inclusive programs for children, apply legal and ethical requirements including ADA and IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act). Exploration of differing abilities of children with physical, cognitive, health/medical, communication, and/or emotional/behavioral disorders, adapt curriculum to meet the needs of children with developmental differences, and cultivate partnerships with families who have children with differing abilities. (Prerequisites: CDEV 1210)

CDEV2510 Internship (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the Child Development and Family Services field. Each internship is an individualized experience. Site selection is based on each student's area of interest in conjunction with the instructor's approval to provide experience related to the skills and knowledge acquired in the program. The focus of the Child Development program is to allow students to integrate and apply skills and knowledge gained in the actual work environment. (Prerequisite: Instructor approval must be granted)

CDEV2520 Children with Challenging Behaviors (3 credits)
This course supports students' understanding of children's behavioral problems and identifies intervention strategies to prevent and resolve problem behaviors. Effective behavior modification techniques and designing behavior plans will be explored. (Prerequisite: CDEV 1230)

CDEV2530 Curriculum Planning (3 credits)
This course provides an advanced level of curriculum planning. Emphasis is on organizing, implementing, and evaluating developmentally appropriate curricula. (Prerequisite: CDEV 1270)

CDEV2550 Cognitive Development (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of cognitive and multimedia learning experiences in either home, school, or center-based settings. Students integrate knowledge of child development, learning environments, and teaching methods to promote curiosity, attention, perception, memory, problem solving, logical thinking, and media literacy. (Prerequisite: CDEV 1210)

CDEV2560 Language and Literacy Development (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of language and literacy learning experiences in home, school, or center-based settings. Students integrate knowledge of child development, learning environments, and teaching methods to promote literacy, conversation, literature, literacy, and bilingualism. (Prerequisite: CDEV 1210)

CDEV2590 Social-Emotional Development and Learning (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of social-emotional learning experiences. Students integrate knowledge of child development, learning environments, and teaching methods to promote emotional development, moral development, self concept, self esteem, social skills, diversity awareness, and social studies. (Prerequisite: CDEV 1210)

CDEV2940 Managing Multiple Sites (1 credits)
This course will examine challenges unique to managing multiple sites. It provides practical information and tools to help managers close the communication gaps created by distance, and get peak performance from employees they don't see everyday. (Prerequisites: CDEV majors only)

CDEV2990 Practicum Project (1 credits)
During this project you will gain a broad view of program quality in an early childhood setting from an organizational perspective, learn how to administer and score the Program Administration Scale, learn how to analyze the results of the PAS and structure program improvements based on these results. (Prerequisite: Instructor Approval)

CHEM - Chemistry

CHEM101 The Chemistry of Everything (3 credits)
A chemistry course for non-science major which explores the world from a chemical perspective. This course is designed to increase students' scientific literacy. A two-hour lab is included. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 2, 3: Critical Thinking, Natural Sciences)

CHEM108 Introduction to Chemistry (4 credits)
A one-semester introduction to the field of chemistry, this course is designed to allow the student to understand how chemistry relates to everyday life and to learn some of the language and concepts of chemistry related to applied health. This course uses a math-based approach. (Prerequisite: [Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher] AND [have a Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or (Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher and Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher) or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher or MCA Math score of 1158 or higher.] (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

CHEM110 Chemistry for the Health Sciences (4 credits)
Key concepts of general, organic, and biological chemistry are introduced in an integrated approach with applications from the medical fields. The course is designed to prepare students for Anatomy, Physiology, and Microbiology or to be utilized as a general Arts and Sciences course. Limited mathematical approach; this course does not meet the requirements of a prerequisite for CHEM 120. Lecture and a 2-hour lab are included. (Prerequisite: [Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher] AND [ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher] AND [have a Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or (Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher and Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher) or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher or MCA Math score of 1158 or higher.] (MNTC 2, 3: Critical Thinking, Natural Sciences)

CHEM120 Principles of Chemistry I (5 credits)
This course introduces the student to the basic principles of chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, solution chemistry, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, periodicity, and states of matter. Laboratory reinforces lecture concepts. (Prerequisites: Accuplacer College Level Math score of 103 or ACT Math score of 22 and CHEM 108 or MATH 120 and CHEM 108 or a grade of "C" or better in high school chemistry within the past 3 years.)

CHEM121 Principles of Chemistry II (5 credits)
Principles of Chemistry II is the second in a series of Chemistry courses designed for students who plan to major in a scientific or health related field. Topics include kinetics, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, precipitation reactions, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Lab topics reinforce lecture concepts. (Prerequisite: CHEM 120) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

CHEM220 Organic Chemistry I (5 credits)
Organic Chemistry I is the first course in a two semester sequence which covers the structure, stereochemistry, physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms and synthesis of carbon-containing compounds. Emphasis on alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Laboratory experiments will integrate green methods into common synthetic techniques and the preparation and reactions of functional groups. (Prerequisite: CHEM 121)

CMAE - Advanced Manufacturing Core

CMAE1510 Print Reading (2 credits)
This course will give students an understanding of basic mechanical drawing principles. Topics include the alphabet of lines, arrangement of views, orthographic projections, scaling, dimensioning, tolerancing, and symbols. Students will read and interpret mechanical drawings. (Prerequisites: None)

CMAE1514 Safety Awareness (2 credits)
This course is designed to align with the National Skill Standard assessment and certification system for Safety Awareness. The course curriculum is based on federally-endorsed national standards for production workers. This course will introduce OSHA standards relating to personal protective equipment, Hazard Communication, tool safety, confined spaces, electrical safety, emergency responses, lockout/tagout, and others. (Prerequisites: None)

CMAE1518 Manufacturing Process and Production (2 credits)
This course is designed to align with the National Skill Standard assessment and certification system for Manufacturing Processes. The course curriculum is based on federally-endorsed national standards for production workers. The course emphasizes Just-In-Time manufacturing principles, basic supply chain management, communication skills, and customer service. (Prerequisites: None)

CMAE1522 Quality Practices (2 credits)
This course is designed to align with the National Skills Standard assessment and certification system for Quality Practices. The course curriculum is based upon federally-endorsed national standards for production workers. Emphasis is placed on continuous improvement concepts and how they relate to a quality management system. Students will be introduced to a quality management system and its components. These include corrective actions, preventative actions, control of documents, control of quality records, internal auditing of processes, and control of non-conforming product. (Prerequisites: None)

CMAE1526 Maintenance Awareness (2 credits)
This course is designed to align with the National Skills Standard assessment and certification system for Maintenance Awareness. The course curriculum is based upon federally-endorsed national standards for production workers. The Maintenance Awareness course introduces the concepts of Total Productive Maintenance and preventative maintenance. Students will be introduced to lubrication, electricity, hydraulics, pneumatics, and power transmission systems. (Prerequisites: None)

CMAE1528 Career Success Skills (1 credits)
This is an introductory career success skills course. The primary goal of this course is to help individuals acquire a solid foundation in the basic skills for a successful career. This course will identify the skills important to businesses and help the student assess his/her level of skill. The course will provide suggestions for how the student can improve his/her level of skill. (Prerequisites: None)

COMM - Communication

COMM100 Introduction to Human Communication (3 credits)
This course is an introductory survey course of the communication discipline. It provides a sample of topics from interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, public speaking, small group communication, media, organizational communication, and interviewing. This course will offer students knowledge about communication and offer the opportunity to improve their skills. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 1: Communication)

COMM110 Public Speaking (3 credits)
Learners in this class develop (or improve) skills in creating, organizing, supporting, and delivering both informative and persuasive messages to peer audiences. Through this course, students will develop arguments and practice academic research skills in order to adequately support their messages and develop credibility and professionalism. Learners will practice critical thinking and listening skills, support fellow students while delivering impromptu and extemporaneous speeches, and provide peer feedback to ideas and speech development. This course stresses building confidence as public communicators so students may speak effectively at work, in their communities, and as citizens in a democracy. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher) (MNTC: Goal areas 1 and 9).

COMM120 Small Group Communication (3 credits)
This course helps students develop or improve their participation in small groups and teams using effective communication and critical thinking. Content of the course includes both knowledge and skills components. Students can develop an understanding of communication and group theory while applying their knowledge in small group discussions, cooperative projects, and other activities. The course curriculum emphasizes reflection and growth. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC: Goals 1 and 2).

COMM130 Intercultural Communication (3 credits)
The focus of intercultural communication is to develop and improve the knowledge needed to understand culture, communication, how culture influences communication, and the process of communication between people from different cultures or co-cultures. The course also focuses on practicing the skills needed for effective intercultural interactions. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 7, 8: Human Diversity, Global Perspectives)

COMM140 Interpersonal Communication (3 credits)
In this class, participants will examine key components of interpersonal communication theory, identify the interpersonal communication skills necessary for healthy relationships, assess their own interpersonal communication effectiveness, and practice and hone interpersonal communication skills necessary for healthy home and work relationships. This course will also address relevant issues of social interaction, including how human diversity/culture (age, race, gender, etc.) affects our interpersonal communication. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 1: Communication)

COMM150 Introduction to Mass Communication (4 credits)
Introduction to Mass Communication explores the structures, functions, responsibilities, and effects of the media in contemporary society. Students will gain an understanding of the social, economic, and intellectual forces that help shape the media. The course presents concise historical perspectives of each major type of mass media. However, the primary focus is on the issues surrounding contemporary mass media with a strong emphasis on media literacy and ethical responsibility. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 2, 9: Critical Thinking, Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

COMM160 Practicum in Forensics Competition (2 credits)
Forensics is an activity where students will be able to learn more about the process of human communication through actively engaging and performing in public address, oral interpretation, limited preparation and debate competition with colleges and universities from across the nation. Each week students will participate in lessons, workshops and coaching sessions that will assist them in preparing for intercollegiate competition. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) Permission of instructor is REQUIRED.

COMM190 Special Topics in Communication Studies (1 - 3 credits)
This special topics course provides students an opportunity to examine topics of interest in the field of communication studies. Topics in this course are specially designed by instructors at South Central College based on instructor interests, student interests, and/or the instructor's teaching expertise. Topics may or may not be equivalent to courses at other colleges and universities. Students may repeat the course under different topics. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) Meets MNTC goal 1).

COMP - Computer Careers

COMP1120 Foundations of Computing (4 credits)
This course introduces the student to the world of information systems and technology. Students will explore the history of computing, career opportunities in information technology, computer concepts as they apply to a business environment, basic web page development, command-line interfaces, file management principles, computer numbering systems, and database principles. Students will also receive initial exposure to computer programming and algorithms through the use of problem analysis, pseudo-code and entry-level programming. (Prerequisites: None)

COMP1125 Spreadsheet/Database Integration (4 credits)
The focus of this course will be on the core competencies of spreadsheet and database software as the tools for storing and manipulating data. Topics covered in the spreadsheet portion of the course include formatting, creating formulas and using functions, and creating charts and pivot tables to analyze and interpret the data. Topics covered in the database portion include understanding the concepts, design, and construction of a relational database. The student will learn how to design, implement, and maintain a database using entity-relationship models, normalization, and Structured Query Language (SQL). Basic Windows navigation skills will be beneficial. (Prerequisites: None)

COMP1130 Programming Fundamentals (4 credits)
Programming Fundamentals is designed to be a person's first exposure to the world of computer programming. This course covers how to design and implement a computer program, writing a program that will make different types of decisions, how to solve problems using computer programs that remember things, make decisions, and perform repetitive tasks. The course uses both Alice and JavaScript to help the student meet these objectives. Alice is a 3-D programming environment from Carnegie Mellon University designed to teach programming concepts. It is an enjoyable and easy-to-user programming environment that assists the student in making 3-D, animated movies. JavaScript, is a popular language used for by web browsers to get input from the user. JavaScript teaches client-side scripting. This course is part of the Web Programming Certificate and the AAS Information Systems programming degree at South Central College. You will need to have a basic understanding of (X)HTML for the second half of this course which uses JavaScript. A minimum typing speed of 20-35 wpm is recommended. (Prerequisites: COMP 1120)

COMP1140 Web for Business (3 credits)
This course approaches developing web pages from a business point of view. It covers HTML5 and CSS3 markup languages used to create web pages. The course is intended for people wanting to learn how to create and publish web pages. No previous experience with HTML or programming is required. (Prerequisites: None)

COMP1200 PC Hardware and Software Essentials (4 credits)
PC Hardware and Software, presents an in-depth exposure to computer hardware and operating systems. Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance, and safety issues. Through hands on activities and labs, students learn how to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems. In addition, an introduction to networking is included. This course helps students prepare for CompTIA's A+ certification. (Prerequisites: None)

COMP1360 Introduction to Data Communications and Networking (4 credits)
This course serves as a general introduction for students seeking to acquire a foundation in current network technologies for local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and the Internet. The course provides an introduction to the hardware, software, terminology, components, design, and connections of a network. Network concepts such as the OSI model, topologies, and major protocols, as well as the basic functions of system administration and operation are also included. The course is operating system independent and provides an introduction to several popular network operating systems. (Prerequisite: COMP 1200 or instructor approval)

COMP2145 Web Programming (4 credits)
This course covers the popular server-side language PHP and Drupal, a popular CMS (Content Management System). It includes important language concepts such as data types, control statements, debugging techniques, the use of SQL (Standard Query Language). PHP will give the student experience with LAMP (Linux, apache, MySQL, and PHP). (Prerequisites: COMP 1140 with a grade of C or higher, or a working knowledge of HTML, CSS, and FTP; COMP 1130 with a grade of C or higher, or a working knowledge of at least one programming language. It is strongly recommended that you have a minimum typing speed of at least 35 wpm as well as a working knowledge of Microsoft Access (COMP 1125).

COMP2150 Web Services (4 credits)
This course focuses on web services technologies used in person-to-computer and computer-to-computer communications. Students will understand the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and web services concepts. The students will be able to explain and employ Representational state transfer (REST) or RESTful architecture, the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), and data exchange formats, including eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and JavaScript Object Notation (JSON). Through this course, learners will understand, design and implement scalable and secure RESTful Web APIs (Application Programming Interfaces), utilizing chosen server-side scripting language. The class includes the exploration of the Internet of Things (IOT) concept and web services impact on the embedded systems. (Prerequisites: COMP 1130 and COMP 1140 with a C [2.0] or better)

COMP2300 Java (4 credits)
This course covers OOP (Object Oriented Programming) using the Java language. Inheritance, polymorphism, abstract classes, and interfaces are covered. SWING, exceptions, data structures, and I/O streams will also be covered, demonstrating each of the OO concepts. Minimum typing speed of 35 wpm. You can test your typing speed at http://typingtest.com. (Prerequisites: Successful completion of COMP 1130 Programming Fundamentals (with a C grade or higher), or a working knowledge of another programming language.)

COMP2312 Software Development (4 credits)
Software Development covers common programming techniques used in writing applications as well as demonstrating how to use the current leading Integrated Development Environment. Topics include object-oriented programming, control statements, database programming, and producing web-based applications. The capstone project for this course involves creating an application for a real-life business program. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of COMP 1130 Programming Fundamentals with a C or higher, or instructor permission if the student has a working knowledge of at least one programming language.)

COMP2452 Information Storage and Management (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a strong understanding of underlying storage technologies. This course will cover the varied components of modern information storage infrastructure, including virtual environments. Students will learn about the architectures, features, and benefits of Intelligent Storage Systems; storage networking technologies such as FC-SAN, IP-SAN, NAS, Object-based and unified storage; business continuity solutions such as backup, replication, and archive; the increasingly critical area of information security; and the emerging field of cloud computing. It provides comprehensive learning of storage technology, allowing the student to make more informed decisions in an increasingly complex IT environment. (Prerequisite: COMP 1200)

COMP2453 Virtualization Technologies (4 credits)
The Virtualization Technologies course is designed to get students up to speed on one of the most important aspects of today's IT environment. This course covers the fundamental concepts, components, infrastructure, as well as security and privacy considerations for virtualization systems. Through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and labs, students learn the skills and knowledge necessary to install, configure and manage virtual environments. Students will learn how to effectively plan, implement and manage Cloud Computing in virtual data centers and complete introductory coursework in Virtualization software. Topics will include creating virtualized switches and storage, creating and managing virtual machines, establishing access controls, and performing resource monitoring. With additional effort, students can use this knowledge to pass the VCP Certification Exam. (Prerequisite: COMP 1200)

COMP2456 Cloud Technologies and Services (4 credits)
The Cloud Technologies and Services (CTS) course educates students about cloud deployment and service models, cloud infrastructure, and the key considerations in migrating to cloud computing. The course covers technologies required to build classic (traditional), virtualized, and public / private cloud data center environments. These technologies include storage, networking, desktop and application virtualization. Fundamental models such as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) are explored. Additional areas of focus are backup/recovery, business continuity, security, and management. Students will learn about the key considerations and steps involved in transitioning from the current state of a data center to a cloud computing environment. Upon completing this course, students will have the knowledge to make informed decisions about migrating to cloud infrastructure and choosing the best deployment model for an organization. (Prerequisite: COMP 1200)

COMP2460 Linux Administration (4 credits)
The Linux operating system is extremely popular in the world of servers and the internet and is gaining ground on the desktop. This course takes a student through the Linux operating system from learning how to use the command line and text-based shells through the administration of network services. Major topics include file management, user management, shell scripting and popular programming languages, system administration including print services and telnet, SSH, FTP, HTTP, NFS, and Samba services. (Prerequisites: COMP 1200, 1360)

COMP2462 Microsoft Administration (4 credits)
This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of Microsoft Windows Server and prepares them to perform server administration. The class is based on the requirements of the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) credential and teaches the skills to successfully implement, manage, and troubleshoot Microsoft-Windows-based operating environments. Students apply their knowledge through hands-on projects and case study assignments, and learn how to install and administer Active Directory services and manage Active Directory objects. In addition, they learn how to implement and configure core services such as Networking, Storage, Active Directory Domain Services (ADDS), Group Policy, File and Print services, and Hyper-V. Finally, students learn how to install and administer network protocols and services such as virtual private networking, Routing and Remote Access Service, DHCP, and DNS. (Prerequisites: COMP 1360)

COMP2466 Routing & Switching (4 credits)
This course addresses the integration of routing and switching technologies to create efficient enterprise networks. Students will learn to design, build, and configure a network. Students will configure routing protocols and perform LAN, WAN, and VLAN troubleshooting using a structured methodology based on the OSI model. Upon completing this course, the learner will be able to select and implement the appropriate Cisco IOS services required to build a scalable, efficient, and highly available network. This course helps students prepare for the CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Administrator) exam. (Prerequisite: COMP 1360)

COMP2475 Security Basics (4 credits)
An introduction to the various technical and administrative aspects of Information Security (INFOSEC), this course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Students will be exposed to a wide spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. The terminal objectives for this course as defined in NSTISSI Training Standards 4011 are: 1. Understand the threats to and vulnerabilities of information systems. 2. Recognize the need to protect data, information, and the means to process it. 3. Develop a working knowledge of INFOSEC principles and practices. 4. Design, execute, and evaluate INFOSEC security procedures and practices. (Prerequisites: COMP 1360)

COMP2496 Capstone - Software Development (1 - 4 credits)
This course is used to assess and validate student learning and performance throughout the previous semesters as well as to give students an opportunity to practice their skills in a simulated business environment. It is also an opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the learning goals established by South Central College's Computer Careers Department. This course integrates learning from the courses in the major with the courses from the rest of the student's academic experience. Students will work in teams under the supervision of faculty members who will act as project managers. (Prerequisite: Instructor Approval)

COMP2498 Capstone - Networking Services (1 - 4 credits)
This course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the learning goals established by South Central College's Computer Careers Department. This course integrates learning from the courses in the major with the courses from the rest of the student's academic experience. It requires the application of that learning to a service learning project that meets the community need of providing technology assistance to lower income families. Students will gain real world experience using their troubleshooting skills to fix, upgrade and refurbish donated computers. These computers are then recycled back into the community to no-profit organizations and families in need. Students will have an opportunity for reflection through assignments that promote greater understanding of computer concepts and themselves. Students are strongly encouraged to "pass it on," by sharing their computer skills and knowledge through a mentoring process of community members and volunteers. This course will provide an environment, where students can develop a good balance between their technical and "soft" skills. It will include concepts such as team dynamics, conflict management, thinking "outside the box", working with diverse populations and developing professional attitudes and habits. (Prerequisite: Instructor Approval)

COMP2500 Emerging Technologies (4 credits)
eCatalog Use Only

COMP2605 Capstone Project/Internship (1 - 8 credits)
This course is used to assess and validate student learning and performance throughout the previous semesters as well as to give students an opportunity to practice their skills in a simulated business environment. Students will work in teams under the supervision of faculty members who will act as project managers. (Prerequisite: Instructor Approval)

COMP2610 Special Issues: (1 - 3 credits)
This course allows students to pursue special interest areas and to gain exposure to emerging technologies in Information Systems and Networking. (Prerequisite: Instructor Approval)

CP - Community Paramedic

CP2500 Roles Advocacy and Outreach (2 credits)
This is an introduction to the role and function of the Community Paramedic (CP). The student will learn about the Community Paramedic's specific role and function as a member of the health care team and part of the community. The student will identify the components of the role, define it, and explain the "scope of practice" for the position of CP. Additionally, the student will learn about the role of the CP as an advocate for clients in the community. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Community Paramedic Program. All CP courses must be taken concurrently)

CP2505 Community Assessment (2 credits)
This course is designed to introduce the role of the Community Paramedic (CP) as a member of the health care team in community assessment. The student will map the community health care services, describe the demographics of the community and assess their impact on the health of the clients. Additionally, the student will gain understanding of community health services in order to give advice on health care needs in the community. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Community Paramedic Program. All CP courses must be taken concurrently)

CP2510 Care and Prevention Development Strategies (3 credits)
This course will introduce the responsibilities of the Community Paramedic (CP) for gathering appropriate patient/client information and maintaining accurate records, including documentation of encounters between the CP and the patient/client. The student will also learn about the CP's role in assessing health care needs and appraising health care conditions. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Community Paramedic Program. All CP courses must be taken concurrently)

CP2520 Community Paramedic Clinical (5 credits)
This course will provide the student with clinical training under the supervision of a medical director, physician, nurse practitioner, physician's assistant or public health provider. The student will recommend appropriate health and/or social care professionals for the patient, prioritize jobs, and provide both advice and care. The student's placement in the clinical is based on qualifications and past training and experience. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Community Paramedic Program. All CP courses must be taken concurrently)

CRTK - Critical Thinking

CRTK100 Critical Thinking (3 credits)
This course helps students acquire and develop critical thinking skills. Focused on the practical application of the principles of good reasoning, it encourages them to cultivate cognitive virtues such as consistency, self-awareness, open-mindedness, fairness, and intellectual humility. Students will be taught how to: recognize (and make) good arguments, identify (and avoid) logical fallacies and cognitive biases, articulate ideas in a clear and precise way, understand the significance and limits of the scientific method, and critically evaluate sources in the media. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC: 2 Critical Thinking)

CTLS - Civil Engineering Technology

CTLS1110 Basic AutoCAD (3 credits)
This course covers the basic operations of AutoCAD. It includes drafting and editing, drawing setup, scaling and plotting. (Prerequisites: None)

CTLS1800 Construction Contract Documents (3 credits)
This course covers the concepts relating to Civil Engineering drawings, construction specifications, and legal documents as associated with the industry. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100)

CTLS1805 Civil Cad (3 credits)
This course covers the use of AutoDesk Civil 3D software in the design and drawing of Civil Engineering plans. (Prerequisite: CTLS 1110)

CTLS1810 Introduction to Surveying (4 credits)
This course covers the principles of plane surveying involving methods of measuring horizontal and vertical distance, elevation and angles. Practice in the use of common measurement equipment, leveling instruments, compass, transit, theodolite and total station is stressed along with introduction to Global Positioning Systems and proper care and maintenance of all equipment. Recording of field information and correction of acquired data are an important part of this course. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH 0075 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or Next Generation Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher or MCA Math score of 1146 or higher.)

CTLS1815 Surveying 2 (4 credits)
This course covers the practices and techniques required in topographic, route, control, and construction surveys. It will also stress highway curves, cross-sections, and layout. The course will focus on the use, care, and maintenance of TopCon total stations and Trimble GPS. (Prerequisites: CTLS 1810)

CTLS1820 Materials Technology (4 credits)
This course covers the types of materials, construction methods, and quality control necessary in the construction of driven surfaces. The course examines basic geology with soil identification and classification for base construction, materials evaluation, testing methods for quality assurance in grading and base, bituminous surfacing, and concrete surfacing. This course is based on MnDOT certification requirements in the areas of Aggregate Production and Concrete Field 1. (Prerequisite: Must have a Next Generation Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 250 or higher; or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher or MCA Math score of 1146 or higher or completion of MATH 0075 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.)

CTLS2110 Statics and Strengths of Materials (3 credits)
This course covers an introduction to structural theory and calculation. It includes analysis of forces, vectors, calculations of forces, moments and internal stresses and strains in structural materials. It also includes tracing of load paths through the structure. (Prerequisite: MATH 125)

CTLS2825 Civil Design (4 credits)
This course covers the general techniques and procedures used in the design of necessary infrastructure associated with highway design. Bentley's Microstation software is utilized throughout the course. (Prerequisites: CTLS 1110, 1815)

CTLS2830 Construction Estimating and Inspections (4 credits)
This course covers the study and performance of procedures necessary in estimating quantities and costs and construction inspection of heavy construction. Emphasis is placed on construction inspection through measurement of quantities, documentation, record keeping, and contract document interpretation. The equipment and materials utilized are also presented. (Prerequisite: CTLS 1110)

CTLS2835 Introduction to Land Surveying (3 credits)
This course covers the history of land surveying from the beginning advancement of the United States to modern day standards. Students will learn technical elements of writing legal land descriptions, basic fundamentals of platting land, and methods of researching property and property corners. (Prerequisite: CTLS 1110, CTLS 1810)

CTLS2845 Special Studies (1 - credits)
Students work independently or in groups on special problems or subjects relating to the industry. (Prerequisites: Instructor approval)

CTLS2846 Hydrology and Hydraulics (3 credits)
This course introduces the basic design of water treatment and distribution systems, wastewater treatment and collection systems, stormwater flow systems, stormwater detention facilities, erosion control, and stormwater pollution prevention plans. (Prerequisites: CTLS 1110, MATH 120)

CTLS2851 Internship (3 credits)
The internship/practicum requires a minimum of 144 hours of hands-on experience performing civil engineering technology duties, such as construction Inspection, surveys, roadway design, GIS, materials testing, and or other duties as requested. This course is designed to provide the student with a field experience to observe how procedures and/or policies are implemented and completed in civil engineering environments. (Prerequisites: None)

CULN - Culinary Arts

CULN1100 Introduction to Foodservice (2 credits)
This course includes an introduction to the food service industry, culinary terms, use of weights and measures, and kitchen safety. The course also covers equipment and knife identification and use. (Prerequisites: None)

CULN1101 Sanitation & Food Safety (2 credits)
This course develops an understanding of the basic principles of sanitation and safety in order to maintain a safe and healthy environment in the food service industry for the consumer. Also covered is an understanding of the laws and regulations related to sanitation in food service operations. (Prerequisites: None)

CULN1102 Culinary Math (1 credits)
Students will learn standard units of measurements and unit conversions, recipe scaling, percentages, rounding, and yield tests as they relate to the food service industry. (Prerequisite: Next Generation Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher of MCA Math score of 1146 or higher or completion of MATH 0075 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher)

CULN1103 Culinary Fundamentals 1 (4 credits)
Students will learn basic concepts and principles of cooking. Students will be introduced to mise en place. Students will identify herbs and spices and different cooking methods. They will demonstrate proper knife skills and basic vegetable cuts. Students will make basic stocks, mother sauces and soups. (Corequisites: CULN 1101 and CULN 1104)

CULN1104 Culinary Fundamentals 2 (4 credits)
Students will be introduced to all conventional and non-conventional cooking methods. They will convey knowledge and perform proper cooking of meats, poultry, fish, starches, and vegetables. They will expand their knowledge and skills in creation of sauces, from mother sauces to small sauces. In addition, they will create relishes, flavored oils, salsas, compotes, coulis, and purees. (Corequisite: CULN 1103)

CULN1105 Butchery (4 credits)
This course covers the identification and preparation techniques of various cuts and grades of meats, poultry, fish/shellfish, and game meats.This course will also teach the processing (butchering) and the storage of fresh meats and the operation and cleaning of meat processing equipment. (Corequisite: CULN 1101)

CULN1106 World Cuisine & Cultures (2 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to world cuisines and their cultures. Students will prepare food from Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and cuisines of the Americas. (Corequisite: CULN 1101)

CULN1200 Garde Manger 1 (3 credits)
Students will be introduced to Garde Manger: the art of cold foods. They will gain knowledge and demonstrate skills used for the creation of salads, dressings, and a variety of hot and cold sandwiches. (Prerequisite: CULN 1101) (Corequisite: CULN 1201)

CULN1201 Garde Manger 2 (3 credits)
Students will be introduced to the fine art of fruit and vegetable carvings, buffet presentations, appetizers, and hors d' oeuvres along with the art of charcuterie. (Corequisite: CULN 1200)

CULN1202 A la Carte Cooking & Production (4 credits)
Students will apply the foundation of cooking techniques and fundamentals in a la Carte and batch cooking. Students will work as a team as well as individually to demonstrate their skills. (Prerequisite: CULN 1104)

CULN1203 Baking 1 (2 credits)
This course covers the preparation and makeup of a variety of yeast raised doughs. Students use a variety of commercial equipment to produce breads, Danish, croissants, rolls and yeast raised coffee cakes. Students will be introduced to baking equipment, recipe conversions, and sanitation processes in a bakery. (Prerequisite: CULN 1101) (Corequisite: CULN 1204)

CULN1204 Baking 2 (4 credits)
This course covers baking terminology, function of ingredients and the preparation of finished products: quick breads, pies, cakes, cookies, dessert sauces, custards, puddings, classical desserts, and specialty cake decorating. (Corequisite: CULN 1203)

CULN1205 Hospitality Nutrition (2 credits)
This course covers the basic information to understand food trends, digestion and utilization processes, menu development for normal and special diets, and the preparation of nutritionally balanced meals. (Prerequisite: CULN 1100)

CULN1300 Culinary Management (4 credits)
Students will learn of various management topics including: leadership, training, motivation, delegation, hiring, problem solving, and conflict resolution. Students will learn information and skills necessary to analyze and improve profitability. Other topics covered are income statements, forecasting sales, labor and food costs. They will also learn about the cycle of food purchasing. (Prerequisite: CULN 1100)

CULN1301 Advanced Culinary (4 credits)
This is the capstone culinary class where students demonstrate their advanced culinary abilities by creating a menu, developing a budget, planning and management of a team, menu preparation, and serving. (Prerequisites: CULN 1201, 1204)

CULN1302 Sustainable Foods & Organic Cooking (1 credits)
Students will be introduced to sustainable farming and why it is important. They will also explore organic versus conventional farming and the nutritional differences. (Prerequisite: CULN 1100)

DA - Dental Assisting

DA1811 Dental Science I (2 credits)
Dental Science is designed to provide the student with the fundamental, anatomical,and physiological structures of the human body, All body systems will be covered including embryology and histology. The focus of the course is to help students with no prior preparation in science to have a fundamental understanding of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the head and neck. The student will develop the necessary background knowledge to be a successful chairside and clinical assistant. (Prerequisite: Admitted to Dental Assisting program; AND have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher AND completion of either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 or ENGL 100 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.)

DA1812 Oral Anatomy (2 credits)
Dental anatomy is the fundamental study of permanent and primary dentition, including function, occlusion and annotation systems. The focus of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge to identify adult and children's dentition, distinguish occlusion, understand eruption patterns and developmental process. (Prerequisites: admission to Dental Assisting program; AND a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 21 or higher or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher AND completion of either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 or ENGL 100 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.)

DA1813 Preclinical Dental Assisting (2 credits)
Pre-Clinical Dental Assisting is designed to provide fundamental knowledge of microbiology and infection control measures. Emphasis will be placed on personal protection, risk management, sterilization, chemical disinfection, environment surface and equipment aseptic techniques. The student will develop the skills necessary to apply the techniques gained within the course to all clinical and laboratory courses. Standard precautions will be utilized throughout the entire curriculum, within all courses which apply. (Prerequisites: COMM 140; PHIL 100 or PHIL 150; HLTH 1950; HLTH 1952; Co-requisite: DA 1814)

DA1814 Chairside Dental Assisting I (4 credits)
Chairside Dental Assisting I provides laboratory and clinical knowledge and skills required for dental assisting clinical techniques and methods. Areas of emphasis are: clinical asepsis, safety, ergonomics, patient management and preparation, dental instruments and nomenclature, chairside assisting techniques, 4-6 handed dentistry, and treatment planning. (Prerequisites: COMM 140; PHIL 100 or PHIL 150; HLTH 1950; HLTH 1952; DA 1812; Co-requisite: DA 1813)

DA1815 Dental Materials (3 credits)
This course is designed to give students fundamental knowledge in dental materials, their purpose, composition, manipulation, properties, purposes, and storage as utilized in the dental practice and laboratory setting. The course includes both didactic and laboratory instruction for various material types including gypsum, impression materials, waxes, cements, and restorative materials. Safety in handling materials will be emphasized in laboratory. (Prerequisites: DA 1811, DA 1812)

DA1816 Radiology I (3 credits)
Radiology I is designed to provide knowledge and skills in radiation history, intra-oral and extra-oral radiographic techniques, image principles and techniques, radiographic equipment and image receptors, radiographic infection control, radiation exposure guidelines, patient and operator protection/safety, patient relations, education, and legal issues, anatomical landmarks and pathology, radiographic film mounting and viewing, radiographic interpretation, and record keeping. (Prerequisites: DA 1811, DA 1812, DA 1850)

DA1823 Dental Science II (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide basic knowledge in oral pathology and pharmacology. Emphasis will be placed on methods of application, classifications and usage of knowledge in clinical settings. (Prerequisites: DA 1811, DA 1812)

DA1825 Dental Assisting Expanded Functions (5 credits)
Dental Assisting Expanded Functions is designed to train chairside dental assistants in the Expanded Functions for an advanced level of skills and knowledge permitted to provide intra-oral patient care procedures beyond traditional dental assisting duties. Procedures emphasized will be those legally allowed by the Minnesota Board of Dentistry for Licensed Dental Assistants. (Prerequisites: DA 1814, 1815)

DA1826 Radiology II (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of Radiology I. This in-depth course will cover the history of radiation, radiation physics, and differing radiation characteristics. The course will also include patient exposures, patient management and quality assurance. Students will also learn film techniques and processing. (Prerequisities: DA 1816)

DA1827 Dental Nutrition (1 credits)
This course is designed to provide basic background knowledge in nutrition as it pertains to dental health and preventative dental philosophies. Emphasis will be placed on preventative dentistry and nutrition benefits of dental health. The focus of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge to define nutrition, describe key nutrients, use dietary guidelines, food labeling, food pyramids, define dental diets. Emphasis will be placed on dental health and nutritional guidelines. (Prerequisite: Admitted to Dental Assisting program)

DA1828 Nitrous Oxide Sedation (1 credits)
Nitrous Oxide Sedation is designed to provide fundamental knowledge, elements, purposes, and uses of Nitrous Oxide sedation for the Dental Hygienist and Dental Assistant. (Prerequisites: DA 1814, HLTH 1950, HLTH 1952, CPR must be valid throughout the course.)

DA1830 Chairside Dental Assisting II (4 credits)
Chairside Dental Assisting II is a continuation of Chairside Dental Assisting I designed to provide knowledge of general and specialty dentistry with associated chairside dental assisting laboratory and clinical skills. Emphasis will be placed on general and specialty dental procedures, associated skills, dental armamentarium and supplies. (Prerequisites: DA 1814, 1815)

DA1845 Clinical Affiliations (8 credits)
This course is designed to give the dental assistant student practical experience in dental practices. The extra-mural experiences will be completed in local dental offers including specialty areas as available. Clinical duties and expanded functions covering all aspects of the dental practice will be utilized. (Prerequisites: Successful completion of all previous dental assisting courses. Valid Healthcare Provider CPR)

DA1850 Dental Business Technologies (3 credits)
The course is designed to introduce students to dental software and implement software skills in clinical courses. This course will also expose students to business management aspects including administrative, financial and records management. Basic computers skills are needed for successful completion of course (Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assisting program)

DA1855 Ethics and Jurisprudence (1 credit)
This course will focus on the rules and regulations found in the Minnesota Dental Practice Act. An understanding of ethical and legal implications for dental practitioners will prepare students to take the Minnesota Jurisprudence exam for dental practitioners. (Prerequisites: DA 1825 and DA 1860)

DA1860 Expanded Functions II (4 credit)
Expanded Functions II is designed to provide knowledge of general and specialty dentistry with associated chairside dental assisting laboratory and clinical skills. Emphasis will be placed on general and specialty dental procedures, including expanded dental procedures legally allowed by the Minnesota Board of Dentistry for Licensed Dental Assistants. (Prerequisite: DA 1814, DA 1815).

DA3000 Dental State Board Refresher (1 - credits)
Review of material for Dental registration exam.

EAP - English for Academic Purposes

EAP0070 English for Introductory Algebra (2 credits)
This course provides specialized language and cultural support for multilingual students concurrently enrolled in any section of MATH 0075. Students whose first language is not English are explicitly instructed in American English mathematical terms related to Introductory Algebra, including the cultural context and language used in algebraic expressions, functions, polynomials, exponents, solving and graphing linear equalities and inequalities, interpreting data in graphical form, factoring polynomials, simplifying rational expressions, and solving and simplifying radical and rational equations. Students are encouraged to activate and build on previous learning by comparing the way they were taught math in their other languages with the way they are taught in the U.S. (Prerequisite: Classic Accuplacer ESL Reading Skills score of 0 -100) (Co-requisites: Concurrent enrollment in any section of MATH 0075)

EAP0075 English for Intermediate Algebra (2 credits)
This course provides specialized language and cultural support for multilingual students concurrently enrolled in any section of MATH 0085. Students whose first language is not English are explicitly instructed in American English mathematical terms related to Intermediate Algebra, including the cultural context and language used in equations and inequalities, linear functions, polynomial and rational functions, quadratic functions, equations involving radicals, and absolute values. Students are encouraged to activate and build on previous learning by comparing the way they are taught math in their other languages with the way they are taught in the U.S. (Prerequisite: Classic Accuplacer ESL Reading Skills score of 0-100) (Co-requisites: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 0085)

EAP0080 English for Academic Purposes: Reading and Oral Communication (4 credits)
EAP 0080 English for Academic Purposes: Reading and Oral Communication is equivalent to READ 0080 for multilingual students whose first language is not English. Special attention is given to skills and strategies for coping with college textbook reading assignments and lectures across the curriculum, by looking at course syllabi and excerpts of readings and lectures from major programs of high interest to the students, by listening to guest speakers, and by visiting and observing a variety of South Central College (SCC) courses. Students will also learn practical reading skills for navigating D2L as well as the SCC website, coping with online and digital readings and quizzes, accessing student support services, and attending SCC info sessions and events. Each student will develop a personalized approach to becoming an autonomous learner of academic vocabulary. The multicultural diversity in this course is a catalyst for thought and discussion, with readings and lectures by and about the students' heritage cultures. Together, the students will build an understanding of how SCC and the Minnesota State system compares to their previous sites of learning and/or systems of higher education in other countries. (Prerequisites: ESL Accuplacer Reading Skills score of 60 - 82)

EAP0085 English for Academic Purposes: College Writing and Grammar (4 credits)
EAP 0085 English for Academic Purposes: College Writing and Grammar is equivalent to ENGL 0080 for multilingual students whose first language is not English. This course is an introduction to academic writing, grammar, and communication for students who need more instruction in and practice with English spelling, punctuation, pronunciation, simple and compound sentence structure, and paragraph structure. Special attention is given to English keyboarding skills and learning to navigate the D2L LMS, as well as the practical skills of using campus email and filling out forms and documents needed to maintain one┬┐s status as a student. Explicit instruction is also given in the academic expectations and speaking skills demanded in higher education in the U.S., such as communicating with instructors, peer and group discussions, seeking help from college staff, and giving short reports and presentations. A cross-cultural comparative approach is taken throughout this course, and students are encouraged actively and critically to think about, write about, and share their experiences and perspectives with the greater SCC community. (Prerequisites: Classic Accuplacer ESL Language Use score of 65-81).

EAP0090 English for Academic Purposes: Advanced Reading and Oral Communication (4 credits)
This course is equivalent to READ 0090 for multilingual students whose first language is not English. It offers a step-by-step approach to building the academic reading, listening, and study skills needed to successfully comprehend college-level textbook readings and lectures, take notes, and prepare for tests. Students apply what they learn to excerpts of college-level textbook readings and excerpts of actual videotaped lectures from SCC courses. Students also work on vocabulary acquisition through the study of academic words typically found in college-level reading materials. Special attention is given to increasing reading speed, navigating online learning management systems, and accessing student and academic support services. (Prerequisites: Classic Accuplacer ESL Reading Skills score of 83-100 or completion of EAP 0080 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher).

EAP0095 English for Academic Purposes: Advanced College Writing and Grammar (4 credits)
EAP 0095 English for Academic Purposes: Advanced College Writing and Grammar is equivalent to ENGL 0090 for multilingual students who speak English as a second language. This course offers instruction in complex sentence structure and strategies for learning and using vocabulary from the Academic Word List, within the context of writing academic essays, participating in discussions, and giving academic presentations. Students will develop their narrative, expository, and argument writing skills using a writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing final drafts for proper spelling, punctuation, and grammar. In addition, students will analyze and practice strategies for interacting effectively with their instructors and classmates in class and on campus. (Prerequisites: Classic Accuplacer ESL Language Use score of 82-100 or completion of EAP 0085 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.)

ECE - Early Childhood Ed.

ECE1205 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of the early childhood field, including theories, philosophies, missions, and regulations. It examines the roles and responsibilities of professionals in a variety of career settings. (Prerequisite: None)

ECE1210 Child Growth and Development (3 credits)
This course is the first in a series of courses that is required for a degree in Early Childhood Education and Family Services. This course encompasses multiple, interrelated areas of children's development - including both typical and atypical, for children from conception through age eight in the areas of physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive and aesthetic/creative development and is supported by coherent theoretical perspectives and by current research. The course emphasizes variations across cultures and interactions between maturational processes and environmental factors. (Prerequisite: None)

ECE1220 Health, Wellness & Nutrition (3 credits)
This course will guide the student in obtaining skills needed to establish and maintain a physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environment for young children. Topics include preventing illness and accidents, handling emergencies, providing health, safety, and nutrition educational experiences, meeting children's basic nutritional needs, child abuse and, current health-related issues. This course does NOT include CPR or first aid certification. (Prerequisites: None)

ECE1230 Behavior Guidance (3 credits)
This course encompasses multiple, interrelated areas of positive child guidance techniques for individual and group situations - including problem prevention and positive guidance strategies, communication, setting limits, problem solving and behavior modification and is supported by coherent theoretical perspectives and by current research. This course emphasizes ways to establish supportive relationships with children and guide them in order to enhance learning, development, and well-being. (Prerequisite: None)

ECE1240 Diverse Children and Family Relations (3 credits)
This course examines how to work with many types of families. Investigates the importance of the family/school partnership, study methods of effectively communicating with families, and identify community organizations and networks that support families. Various classroom strategies will be explored emphasizing culturally and linguistically appropriate anti-bias approaches supporting all children in becoming competent members of a diverse society. (Prerequisites: None)

ECE1270 Creative Activities and Environments (3 credits)
The student will gain knowledge and skills related to providing age-appropriate learning experiences and learning environments for young children. The student will examine the role of the teacher in providing learning experiences to meet each child's needs, capabilities, and interest, and ways to implement the principles of developmentally appropriate practices. The student will practice language and literacy, social, emotional and sensory learning, art and creativity, and math and science learning experiences. (Prerequisite: None)

ECE1310 Infant-Toddler Development and Learning (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of infant-toddler theory and development in home or center-based settings. Students will integrate knowledge of developmental needs, developmentally appropriate environments, effective caregiving, teaching strategies, and observation methods. (Prerequisite: ECE 1210 or CDEV 1210)

ECE2310 Introduction to Special Education (3 credits)
This course examines the development of children with differing abilities. Students will integrate strategies that support inclusive programs for children, apply legal and ethical requirements including, but not limited to, American Disabilities Act and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Differentiate between typical and atypical development, analyze the differing abilities of children with physical, cognitive, health/medical, communication, and/or behavioral/emotional disorders. Explore strategies to adapt curriculum to meet the needs of children with developmental differences and cultivate partnerships with families. (Prerequisite: ECE 1210 or CDEV 1210)

ECE2510 ECE Internship (3 credits)
This course provides students an opportunity to demonstrate the early-childhood-teaching competencies explored in other classes while guided by a teacher in a licensed early-childhood program. These competencies include: developing active and developmentally appropriate environments accessible to the multiple needs of learners, positive behavior guidance strategies, communication skills, and development of professional skills such as communication and respectful interactions with families, colleagues, and other potential partners in the care and education of young children in their care. (Prerequisite: Instructor approval)

ECE2520 Children with Challenging Behaviors (3 credits)
This course supports students' understanding of children's behavioral problems and identifies intervention strategies to prevent and resolve problem behaviors. Effective behavior modification techniques and designing behavior plans will be explored. (Prerequisites: ECE 1210 or CDEV 1210 & ECE 1230 or CDEV 1230)

ECE2530 Curriculum Planning (3 credits)
This course provides an advanced level of curriculum planning. Emphasis is on organizing, implementing, and evaluating developmentally appropriate curricula. (Prerequisite: ECE 1270 or ECE 1270)

ECE2550 Cognitive Development (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of cognitive and multimedia learning experiences in either home, school, or center-based settings. Students integrate knowledge of child development, learning environments, and teaching methods to promote curiosity, attention, perception, memory, problem solving, logical thinking, and media literacy. (Prerequisite: ECE 1210 or CDEV 1210)

ECE2560 Introduction to Language and Literacy (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to children's language and literacy development from birth to age eight. Students will obtain skills in creating developmentally appropriate learning experiences that support both oral language and emerging literacy skills among children at all developmental levels. Students will be exposed to a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support children's language and literacy development. (Prerequisite: ECE 1210 or CDEV 1210)

ECE2580 Observation and Assessment (3 credits)
This course focuses on the appropriate use of observation and assessment strategies to document children's development, growth, play and learning, and to join with families and professionals in promoting children's success. The students will explore recording strategies, rating systems, multiple assessment tools, and portfolios. There will be a focus on increasing objectivity in observing and interpreting children's behavior, observing development characteristics, and increasing the awareness of normal patterns of behavior. (Prerequisites: ECE 1210 or CDEV 1210 and ECE 1230 or CDEV 1210.)

ECE2590 Introduction to Children's Mental Health (3 credits)
This course provides a deeper look at social-emotional learning experiences and the long-term effects of positive experiences. Students integrate knowledge of healthy child development, developmentally appropriate learning environments and teaching methods to promote positive emotional development, social development, self-concept, self-esteem, social skills, diversity awareness, resiliency, and attachment. (Prerequisite: ECE 1210 or CDEV 1210 and ECE 1230 or CDEV 1230)

ECON - Economics

ECON110 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Macroeconomics is the study of issues that affect whole economies including economic growth, employment levels, management of the money supply, international trade, and economic instability. The course will examine tools governments can use to stabilize and grow economies, as well as controversies surrounding their use. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) This class satisfies MnTC Goal Area 5 (History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences) and MnTC Goal Area 9 (Ethical and Civic Responsibility).

ECON120 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)
Microeconomics is the study of how people, businesses, governments, and other institutions make economic decisions. Topics include market price determination, income determination, resource allocation, and impacts of government policies. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) This course satisfies MnTC goal areas 5 (History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences) and 9 (Ethical and Civic Responsibility).

ECON130 Economics of Public Issues (3 credits)
Approaches used by economists to analyze controversial public policy issues will be introduced. In addition, students will read articles explaining or advocating contrasting sides to issues. A variety of topics will be studied, with the list changing in different semesters. Topic examples may include economic inequality, climate change, and remedies for the Great Recession. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

ENGL - English

ENGL0080 English and Writing I (4 credits)
This course offers a review in the use, basic study, and review of the Standard English language and an introduction to writing essays. The course emphasizes the development of narrative, expository, and argument writing skills using a writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing final drafts for proper spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards in Writing and Language are indicated in parentheses after each competency on the Common Course Outline. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 224 to 236 or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 36 to 55 or MCA Reading score of 1041 or below.)

ENGL0085 Writing and English I and II Modular (6 credits)
In this beginning and intermediate combination writing course, students practice basic grammar and sentence writing skills for two hours per week using a computer-based writing program. Students practice only the writing skills in which they are deficient. Deficiencies are identified by a diagnostic sentence skills test taken at the beginning of the course. While practicing basic sentence writing skills in a computer-based writing program, students concurrently expand and apply these writing skills in the intermediate section, ENGL 0090, which meets an additional four hours per week. The ENGL 0090 section takes place in a traditional classroom and utilizes writing textbooks, teacher instruction, and implementation of the writing process to apply the writing skills and concepts learned. Students must score 50-62 on the Reading Comprehension portion of the Accuplacer Test in order to enroll in this course. This course does not fulfill General Education requirements. Successful completion of this course is equivalent to successful completion of ENGL 0090. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 50-62 on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer Test)

ENGL0090 Writing and English II (4 credits)
This course consists of a review of Standard English grammar, including English usage, sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, and spelling. Students will also study the writing process as it applies to writing both paragraphs and essays. The final project of this class will consist of developing, writing, and editing a persuasive essay. (Prerequisite: Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 237 to 249 or Classic Accuplacer Reading score 56 to 77 or completion of ENGL 0080 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher).

ENGL100 Composition (4 credits)
Composition is concerned with developing, through theory and practice, the ability to communicate in written form for personal and professional reasons. Students will develop writing skills, analytic skills, and critical thinking skills. Students will complete readings, papers, grammar exercises, and in-class activities. Students will complete research and write a research paper. Students will learn methods of writing informatively and persuasively. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher AND completion of either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 1: Communication)

ENGL105 Composition I (CONSORTIUM) (3 credits)
Consortium Class - Iowa Lakes Community College

ENGL110 Introduction to Literature (4 credits)
Introduction to Literature allows students to sample various literary forms (plays, prose, poetry, nonfiction) from various histories and cultures. The course is designed to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills, and increase appreciation of the diversity of human experience. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and the Fine Arts)

ENGL111 Introduction to Film (4 credits)
This course is designed to introduce and acclimate students to film as a significant artistic, rhetorical and cultural medium. Course content focuses on film as an element of popular culture, as well as film genres, cinematic techniques and cinematic conventions. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MnTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL115 Global Peace and Social Justice (4 credits)
Using works of literature such as War is a Force that Gives us Meaning and The Things They Carried, this course provides an introduction to the nature, scope, and methodology of peace studies with a view toward the future. It explores the concept of peace, non-violent movements, and the resolution of conflict between individuals, groups, societies, and nations. It considers the relationships between social justice and economics, human psychology, governmental power, and religion as forces for war as well as forces for peace. (MNTC 9: ETHICAL AND CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY) (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.)

ENGL120 Human Diversity in Literature and Film (4 credits)
This course introduces students to works of literature and film with a focus on understanding the literary and cinematic contributions made by under-represented peoples. The course is designed to develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills, and increase appreciation of the diversity of human experience. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 6, 7: Humanities and Fine Arts, Human Diversity)

ENGL130 World Literature and Film (4 credits)
This course introduces students to works of literature and film from a variety of world cultures. The course is designed to increase knowledge of world cultures and appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in representation and in seeing, believing, and being. The course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

ENGL140 British Literature (4 credits)
This is a one-semester course for students who are interested in the development of English thought and language from the days of the Anglo-Saxons to the present time. Students will examine the historical context of the literature as well as particular authors, ideas, and styles. Class time will be devoted to reading, discussing, and analyzing selected groups of writings representative of major historical periods in the development of British writing. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL150 Introduction to Poetry (4 credits)
This course introduces students to various elements of the genre of poetry, including (but not limited to) word choice, images, figures of speech, symbols, sounds, patterns of rhythm, and poetic forms . Students will use literary criticism techniques as they study poets and poems from many times, places, and movements of literature. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL160 Introduction to Short Story (4 credits)
This course introduces students to the genre of short story and literary analysis. Students will examine literary concepts such as time, setting, place, narrative, plot, characterization, and literary device. They will also study the authors and the influence of history and place on the short story form. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL199 Independent Study: Research and Writing (2 credits)
This course is designed to offer the student an opportunity to do extensive research on a specific topic. Students will complete research, write an in-depth research paper and put together a research portfolio. (Prerequisite: Instructor Permission)

ENGL205 Special Topics in Literature & Film: (4 credits)
All ENGL 205 courses help students understand how literature and film tell stories and create versions of history. Students will explore literary concepts such as time, setting, place, narrative, plot, characterization, and literary device. Students will also study the individual cultures that generate the narratives covered in the class. Any ENGL 205 class has been specially designed by an SCC English instructor to appeal to SCC students. The instructor has chosen the subject material related to his or her interests, students' interests, or his or her teaching expertise. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or instructor permission.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL206 Children's Literature (4 credits)
Children's Literature provides a survey of literature for children from through history to its place in contemporary society. The course introduces students to literature for children from birth to age 21, pairing literature with cognitive, emotional, and social development. Students will explore children's literature as real literature, examining literary concepts such as time, setting, place, narrative, plot, characterization, and literary device. We will also study the individual aspects of culture(s) that generate the narratives covered in class and how children's literature can create its own version of history and reflect its culture. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL208 African American Literature (4 credits)
Surveys African American literature, including short stories, poetry, novels and criticism. Students will be thoroughly acquainted with a scope of African American authors, poets and recognize their contributions to the contextual fabric of America. Students will explore many historical benchmarks within African American history such as slavery, the Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights movement. This course will situate literary works within these historic and cultural contexts, but will also emphasize close readings of the texts. (Prerequisites: This course requires a passing grade in ENGL 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6, 7: Humanities & Fine Arts, Human Diversity)

ENGL210 Introduction to Creative Writing (4 credits)
This course introduces students to the study of creative writing. Course content focuses primarily on reading several genres of writing (e.g., short story, poetry, non-fiction, and play/screenplay) and then practicing those forms and completing constructive critique of students' practice. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL220 Creative Writing: Fiction (4 credits)
For students who have been introduced to the study of creative writing, this course content will focus primarily on the development of fiction-writing skills through reading, evaluating, and practicing the form. Emphasis will be placed on elements of fiction such as character, setting, plot, theme, point of view, and narrative voice. Constructive critique and revision will be practiced. Assignments may take the form of reading, written critical evaluations of literature, quizzes, and student presentations, as well as student creation of works of fiction. (Prerequisite: ENGL 210 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL230 Creative Writing: Screen Writing (4 credits)
For students who are interested in the study of creative writing or film-making, this course content will focus primarily on the development of screen-writing skills through watching film clips, reading screenplays, evaluating story conveyance through the film medium, and practicing writing in the form. Emphasis will be placed on creating a story arc with a three-act sequence while incorporating elements of fiction such as character, setting, plot, theme, point of view, and elements of film such as scene set-up, camera angle, transitions, and primarily dialogue. Constructive critique and revision will be practiced. Assignments may take the form of reading, written critical evaluations of film and literature, occasional quizzes, student presentations, discussion, as well as student creation of screenplay. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100) (MNTC 6: The Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL240 Technical Communication (4 credits)
This course will teach the essential skills of technical communication. It is an introduction in written communication, design production, and design evaluation of technical information. Adapting technical material using a procedural writing style targeted for specific audiences is emphasized. Students will be using rhetorical analysis, collaborative writing, and usability testing. Topics include the design, writing, and editing of proposals and reports. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or a score of 104 or higher on the Sentence Skills portion of the Accuplacer test) (MNTC 1: Communication)

ETEC - Energy Technical Specialist

ETEC2546 Power Plant Technology ( St. Cloud TCC) (4 credits)
This course is offered through St. Cloud Technical & Community College. Please refer to the course description located at the SCTCC website: www.sctcc.edu

ETHN - Ethnic Studies

ETHN101 American Racial Minorities (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the importance and the understanding of the nature of race relations in the United States of America. Students will use the various sociological perspectives as a lens to examine the social construction of race, ethnicity and the evolving nature of race and ethnic relations in the U.S. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

ETHN110 The Immigrant Experience (3 credits)
This course is devoted to understanding controversial issues around immigration to the U.S. The United States is an immigrant country. No other land can challenge America's claim as the ultimate melting pot, although we can argue about whether or not we have really "melted together" to form a cohesive society. Immigrants play a significant role in enriching American culture and fueling economic growth. Yet at the same time, they are also regarded as an "unsettling force" and a burden on the taxpayers. As the numbers of legal as well as illegal, immigrants have climbed precipitously since the 1970s and 1980s, we have seen a backlash against immigration. Immigrants have always been a part of the American scene, but in some periods, more people have come than in others. Currently, immigration is a hot topic as many immigrants are coming from countries such as Somalia, Laos and Mexico. This course will explore questions such as: What is an "American"?; Where do "Americans" come from?; What kinds of immigration issues will affect the future of the United States?; What relevance does immigration have to my life? (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

FBMA - Farm Business Management

FBMA2210 Current Issues in Farm Business Management (1 - 5 credits)
This course is designed to assist students further develop their skills in business management. It provides an opportunity for students to investigate and apply tools that may be effective in improving risk management plans, strategic plans, and business plans in their farm business operations. Emphasis is placed on the research of business management alternatives to meet their business and personal needs. (Students may enroll in a range of one to five credits during each enrollment, depending on their individual needs at the time.) Student and instructor will determine credit load and current issue topic based on student need. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMA2211 Current Issues in Farm Business Management (1 - 5 credits)
This course is designed to assist students further develop their skills in business management. It provides an opportunity for students to investigate and apply tools that may be effective in improving risk management plans, strategic plans, and business plans in their farm business operations. Emphasis is placed on the research of business management alternatives to meet their business and personal needs. (Students may enroll in a range of one to five credits during each enrollment, depending on their individual needs at the time.) Student and instructor will determine credit load and current issue topic based on student need. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMA2212 Current Issues in Farm Business Management (1 - 5 credits)
This course is designed to assist students further develop their skills in business management. It provides an opportunity for students to investigate and apply tools that may be effective in improving risk management plans, strategic plans, and business plans in their farm business operations. Emphasis is placed on the research of business management alternatives to meet their business and personal needs. (Students may enroll in a range of one to five credits during each enrollment, depending on their individual needs at the time.) Student and instructor will determine credit load and current issue topic based on student need. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMA2220 Current Issues in Farm Business Management (1 - 5 credits)
This course is designed to assist students further develop their skills in business management. It provides an opportunity for students to investigate and apply tools that may be effective in improving risk management plans, strategic plans, and business plans in their farm business operations. Emphasis is placed on the research of business management alternatives to meet their business and personal needs. (Students may enroll in a range of one to five credits during each enrollment, depending on their individual needs at the time.) Student and instructor will determine credit load and current issue topic based on student need. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMA2221 Current Issues in Farm Business Management (1 - 5 credits)
This course is designed to assist students further develop their skills in business management. It provides an opportunity for students to investigate and apply tools that may be effective in improving risk management plans, strategic plans, and business plans in their farm business operations. Emphasis is placed on the research of business management alternatives to meet their business and personal needs. (Students may enroll in a range of one to five credits during each enrollment, depending on their individual needs at the time.) Student and instructor will determine credit load and current issue topic based on student need. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMA2222 Current Issues in Farm Business Management (1 - 5 credits)
This course is designed to assist students further develop their skills in business management. It provides an opportunity for students to investigate and apply tools that may be effective in improving risk management plans, strategic plans, and business plans in their farm business operations. Emphasis is placed on the research of business management alternatives to meet their business and personal needs. (Students may enroll in a range of one to five credits during each enrollment, depending on their individual needs at the time.) Student and instructor will determine credit load and current issue topic based on student need. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMA2930 Fundamentals of Financial Management as it Relates to Risk Management (3 credits)
This course is intended to have the student enhance their decision-making skills relating to business risk management. This course will have the student further investigate tools available to their business that would be effective in reducing potential risk for their operation. Emphasis will be placed on having the student research risk management options that will meet their business, family, and personal needs. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMA2931 Applied Financial Management as it Relates to Risk Management (3 credits)
This course is intended to have the student apply concepts in financial management that can be used in the development of a business risk management program. The student is to implement risk management tools that will assist in meeting their business, family, and personal needs. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMA2932 Fundamentals of Financial Management/Strategic Planning Emphasis (3 credits)
This course will enable students to identify the elements necessary to evaluate and create a strategic plan for the business Determining uses for the plan today and tomorrow and developing a plan to locate those team members necessary for strategic plan creation. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMA2933 Applied Financial Management/Strategic Planning Emphasis (3 credits)
This course will provide practical application of strategic planning skills. Application skills will be practiced upon and applied to the student's business and business plan. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMA2934 Fundamentals of Financial Mgmt/Business Plan Emphasis (3 credits)
This course will provide practical application of the business plan. Application skills will be practiced and applied as the student's business plan is prepared and implemented. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMA2935 Applications in Financial Management/Business Plans (3 credits)
This course will provide the necessary instruction to put together and implement a business plan for the farm business.

FBMT - Farm Business Management

FBMT1112 Foundations for Farm Business Management (4 credits)
This course is an overview of the Farm Business Management Program. The student will be introduced to goal setting, self and business assessment, record keeping, and business projections to provide the foundation for personal and business management progress. Current issues affecting business management are an integral part of the course. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT1121 Preparation for Farm Business Analysis (4 credits)
This course will take the student through a step by step procedure to close out a complete year of farm business records. This course will emphasize tax planning, completing inputs to livestock and crop enterprises, and emphasizing cash and liabilities accuracy. A completed business and enterprise analysis will be the course focus. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT1122 Implementing the System Management Plan (4 credits)
This course continues to build on the foundation of farm business management. The student will complete a farm business financial and enterprise analysis. Sound financial record keeping is an integral component. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT1131 Managing and Modifying Farm System Data (4 credits)
This course will help the student refine their farm business data system and assist them in applying year-end procedures for farm business analysis. Students improve accuracy in the following areas: farm enterprise analysis, tax planning, data filing, and cash and liability checks. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT1132 Interpreting and Using Farm System Data (4 credits)
This course provides an opportunity for the student to view the farm business and its various components through the application of balance sheets, farm personal and managerial inventories, enterprise reports and historical data. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMT1170 Intro to Farm Commodity Marketing (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the various methods and tools to market farm commodities.

FBMT1173 Directed Study-Intro to Farm Commodity Marketing (2 credits)
This course provides the student with the opportunity to use the various marketing methods and tools. The students will use various types of marketing contracts and cash markets as well as recognizing the roles of brokers and market advisors. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMT1180 Applying Commodity Marketing Fundamentals (3 credits)
This course is designed to teach students the various methods and tools to market farm commodities. The focus of this course is to apply commodity marketing fundamentals to the farm business.

FBMT1183 Directed Study-Applying Commodity Marketing Fundamentals (2 credits)
This course is designed to teach students to apply the various methods and tools to market farm commodities. The students will develop various marketing tools to enhance their farm business operations. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMT1190 Evaluating Farm Commodity Marketing Tools (3 credits)
This course is designed to teach students to evaluate the various farm commodity marketing tools and to select the appropriate alternative to address the present marketing situation.

FBMT1193 Directed Study-Evaluating Farm Commodity Marketing Tools (2 credits)
This course is designed to teach students to implement the various farm marketing tools and to select the tool appropriate to the present marketing situation. The student will utilize marketing alternatives and apply to farm business marketing. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMT1211 Intro to Farm Business Management (4 credits)
This course introduces basic farm business management concepts. Students will study the farm management planning cycle and develop an understanding of its relationship to: family and farm business goal setting, cash and enterprise accounting principles, and tax planning. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2141 Interpreting and Evaluation of Financial Data (4 credits)
This course continues to expand on preparation and evaluation of the farm business analysis. This course provides continued guidance and perfection of business record close out procedures, tax implications of management decisions, and continues to monitor farm business and family goals. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2142 Interpreting Trends in Business Planning (4 credits)
This course examines whole farm, enterprise, balance sheet, and inventory trends. Current analysis data is compared to historical data in making future farm business planning decisions. Financial ratios are used to indicate the farm financial structure. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2151 Strategies in Farm System Data Management (4 credits)
This course will help the student focus on long term strategies necessary to maintain and enhance the farm business and personal future financial goals. The student will complete the year by developing an accurate, usable business analysis. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2152 Integrating System Information for Financial Planning (4 credits)
This course uses farm system information to develop a farm financial plan. Interpretation and analysis of the farm system data will enhance the reliability of the farm plan. The comprehensive farm plan will integrate historical trends, farm and personal goals, financial and enterprise performance of the farm business. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2161 Examination of the Context of Farm System Management (4 credits)
This course is designed to assist students in preparation of improved farm system management procedures. Students in the course will evaluate several years of an improved farm system analysis. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2162 Refining Farm System Management (4 credits)
This course is the culmination of activities designed to enable the student to develop and implement a comprehensive farm business strategic plan. The student will use the components of the Farm Business Management Program to develop and support a farm business strategic plan. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2170 Monitoring Farm Commodity Marketing Plans (3 credits)
This course is designed to help students revise current farm commodity plans. Emphasis will be placed on current market conditions and pricing opportunities. The student will prioritize and evaluate marketing opportunities and risk. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMT2173 Directed Study-Monitoring Farm Commodity Marketing Plans (2 credits)
This course is designed to justify current farm commodity marketing plans. Emphasis will be placed on current conditions and pricing opportunities. The student will prioritize and evaluate marketing opportunities and risk. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2180 Strategies in Farm Commodity Marketing (3 credits)
This course is designed to plan marketing strategies necessary to achieve farm business. The student will create a year round marketing plan utilizing a variety of marketing strategies to maximize farm income return. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2183 Directed Study-Strategies in Farm Commodity Marketing (2 credits)
This course is designed to plan marketing strategies necessary to achieve farm business. The student will implement a year round marketing plan utilizing a variety of marketing strategies to maximize farm income return. (Prerequisite: None)

FBMT2201 Special Topics-General Farm Management (1 credits)
Analysis of special topics in crop production for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2202 Special Topics-General Farm Management (1 credits)
Analysis of special topics in crop production for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2203 Special Topics-General Farm Management (1 credits)
Analysis of special topics in crop production for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2204 Special Topics-General Farm Management (1 credits)
Analysis of special topics in crop production for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2205 Special Topics-General Farm Management (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in general farm management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Tax planning, balance sheet development, cash flow planning, analysis-whole farm, enterprise analysis, record keeping, bench marking, production yields, ration interpretation and goal setting. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2206 Special Topics-General Farm Management (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in general farm management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Tax planning, balance sheet development, cash flow planning, analysis-whole farm, enterprise analysis, record keeping, bench marking, production yields, ration interpretation and goal setting. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2207 Special Topics-General Farm Management (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in general farm management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Tax planning, balance sheet development, cash flow planning, analysis-whole farm, enterprise analysis, record keeping, bench marking, production yields, ration interpretation and goal setting. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2208 Special Topics-General Farm Management (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in general farm management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Tax planning, balance sheet development, cash flow planning, analysis-whole farm, enterprise analysis, record keeping, bench marking, production yields, ration interpretation and goal setting. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2209 Special Topics-General Farm Management (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in general farm management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Tax planning, balance sheet development, cash flow planning, analysis-whole farm, enterprise analysis, record keeping, bench marking, production yields, ration interpretation and goal setting. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2210 Special Topics-Marketing (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2211 Special Topics-Marketing (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2212 Special Topics-Marketing (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2213 Special Topics-Marketing (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2214 Special Topics-Marketing (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2215 Special Topics-Marketing (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2216 Special Topics-Marketing (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2217 Special Topics-Marketing (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2218 Special Topics-Marketing (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2219 Special Topics-Marketing (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in marketing management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best fit student needs: Small grains, corn, soybeans, pork, cattle, milk, canola, edible beans, vegetable crops, sugar beets, grass seed, forages, seed crops, wild rice, sunflowers, other commodities not listed and organic products. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2220 Special Topics-Crops (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2221 Special Topics-Crops (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2222 Special Topics-Crops (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2223 Special Topics-Crops (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2224 Special Topics-Crops (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2225 Special Topics-Crops (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2226 Special Topics-Crops (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2227 Special Topics-Crops (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2228 Special Topics-Crops (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2229 Special Topics-Crops (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in crop management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, mixed grass, small grains, specialty crops (sunflower, berries, seeds, trees, etc.), pasture, corn silage, cover crops and vegetable crops. (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2230 Special Topics-Livestock (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2231 Special Topics-Livestock (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2232 Special Topics-Livestock (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2233 Special Topics-Livestock (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2234 Special Topics-Livestock (1 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2235 Special Topics-Livestock (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2236 Special Topics-Livestock (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2237 Special Topics-Livestock (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2238 Special Topics-Livestock (2 credits)
This course focuses on the analysis of special topics in livestock management for students actively engaged in the operation and management of a farm business. Student and instructor will choose from said topics to best serve student needs: Beef-cow/calf, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, turkey, chicken, dairy heifers, beef market and specialty livestock (organic, honey bees, deer, elk, etc.). (Prerequisites: None)

FBMT2239 Special Topics-Livestock (2 credits)
This course covers special topics of interest in livestock. (Prerequisites: None)

FCS - Family & Consumer Science

FCS105 Nutrition and Healthy Living (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of basic principles of nutrition. Topics include contemporary issues such as food labeling, dieting practices, eating disorders, fitness, malnutrition, and nutrition throughout the life cycle. This course also focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for the development and enhancement of a healthy lifestyle throughout the life span. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.)

FYE - First Year Experience

FYE100 First Year Experience (1 credits)
First Year Experience is a course created to support students making the transition to college, to empower students to take control of their educational lives, and to help students be successful. The course will promote the development of critical thinking skills and positive educational values. Students will enhance their understanding of communication and learning styles, and lifestyle risks; learn to identify and use appropriate resources both on campus and within the community; acquire skills needed to promote study, personal wellness, goal setting and achievement; develop strategies to manage money, time and stress wisely; and in general develop the necessary skills to be a successful college student. (Prerequisite: None)

FYE999 FYE Waived (0 credits)
FYE Waived

GCC - Graphic Communications

GCC1100 Introduction to Graphic Communications (4 credits)
This is an exploratory course covering many aspects of Graphic Communications. Hands-on projects will acquaint the learner with the various processes that encompass what graphic communications, industry jargon, industry tours and guest speakers are also part of this course. (Prerequisites: Next Gen Accuplacer Reading score 224 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading Score 36 or higher)

GCC1120 Graphic Software 1 (4 credits)
This course will be taught in a hands-on atmosphere, learning the basics of various software packages used within the industry. Students will work with the tools, menus and panels, and integrate the use of the software for print and non-print outputs. (Prerequisites: Next Gen Accuplacer Reading score 224 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 36 or higher)

GCC1130 Layout and Typography (3 credits)
Students will be introduced to the conceptual planning process used in layout and design. Students will understand that type as well as graphics are important design elements of a layout. It will be demonstrated how type interacts with graphics in a layout. Layout principles, color, proofing and preparing literature for output and printing will also be included in this course. (Prerequisites: Next Gen Accuplacer Reading score of 224 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 36 or higher)

GCC1141 Digital Image Exploration (3 credits)
This course is designed to cover basic topics which include input/output hardware and the software involved; basic scanning of graphics and photographs; basic digital camera usage; and file formats, size and resolution comparisons. Additionally, students will cover the basics of color theory and color management with practical knowledge for print and web. This course is taught in a hands-on atmosphere with the emphasis on the different methods of output to various devices and their effect on the digitized image. (Prerequisites: Next Gen Accuplacer Reading score of 224 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 36 or higher)

GCC 1145 - Color Applications and Digital Tools (3 Credits)
This course is designed to cover basic topics which include input/output hardware and the software involved: basic scanning of graphics and photographs; basic digital camera usage; and file formats, size and resolution comparisons. Additionally, students will cover the basics of color theory and color management with practical knowledge for print and web. The course is taught in a hands-on atmosphere with an emphasis on the different methods of output to various devices and their effect on the digitized image. (Prerequisites: Next Gen Accuplacer Reading score 224 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Readig score 36 or higher)

GCC1215 Drawing Foundations for Graphic Communications (3 credits)
This course covers basic drawing fundamentals and the use of drawing as a planning tool. Basic drawing techniques will be used to create thumbnail sketches, comprehensives and digital illustrations. Students will utilize traditional and computer drawing tools. (Prerequisite: GCC 1120)

GCC1220 Graphic Software 2 (4 credits)
Graphic Software 2 is a continuation of GCC 1120 Graphic Software 1. The course is taught in a hands-on atmosphere learning more advanced features of the page layout, vector and raster softwares. Students should already have the fundamentals of the tools, menus and panels within each of the software packages. More advanced topics, interactive features and animation software will be explored. (Prerequisite: GCC 1120 Graphic Software 1)

GCC1260 Printing Processes (4 credits)
This course is designed to acquaint the learner with the fundamentals of printing ink on various substrates. Coursework includes terminology, equipment and safety. The principles of offset lithography, screen, laser and inkjet printing are stressed in a hands-on laboratory atmosphere. Basic prep and post-press processes are also stressed in this course. (Prerequisites: GCC 1120 Graphic Software 1, GCC 1130 Layout and Typography)

GCC2110 Design and Illustration 1 (4 credits)
Students will learn planning procedures for advanced design, illustration and production principles on the board and in the use of various software. Projects may include brochure, package and logo design, variable data layouts, and product photography planning. Color, preflight, output and live industry work will also be covered in this course. The advanced use of industry-used software will be essential in all assignments. (Prerequisites: GCC 1210 Drawing for Graphic Designers, GCC 1220 Graphic Software 2)

GCC2120 Portfolio 1 (3 credits)
Students will design personal business logos and stationery ensembles which will include stationery, cover letters and resumes. Traditional portfolio page layouts will be designed and revised throughout the semester. Student work will be prepared for display in their portfolios. (Prerequisite: GCC 1220 Graphic Software 2)

GCC2150 Web/Interactive Media 2 (3 credits)
This course covers the basic preparation, planning and software used for multimedia and web presentation. Students will learn planning procedures for web and interactive media. These procedures will include planning flowcharts, wireframes and storyboards. Students will also learn file formatting and file preparation for web and interactive media. (Prerequisites: GCC 1220 and COMP 1140)

GCC2161 Production Work Flow 1 (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce the Graphic Communications student to the workplace through tours, live projects, and special topics. Students will perform production tasks of design work of the student and/or live work of a customer within the college or non-profit entities within the community. These hands-on projects will incorporate all phases of graphic communications from design to workflow to production and finishing. Emerging technology and topics will also be discussed and researched as part of this course. (Prerequisites: GCC 1220 Graphic Software 2, GCC 1260 Printing Processes)

GCC2210 Design and Illustration 2 (4 credits)
This course is a continuation of GCC 2110 Design and Illustration 1. Students will work in a hands-on atmosphere with higher-level projects such as packaging layouts, multi-page layouts and large format printing. The advanced use of industry-used software will be essential in all assignments. (Prerequisite: GCC 2110 Design and Illustration 1)

GCC2220 Portfolio 2 (3 credits)
Students will continue to research potential employment sites and prepare for the interviewing process in the graphic communications field. The students will continue to research, update and expand their portfolios with projects from other Graphic Communications courses as they prepare for graduation and entering the job market. (Prerequisite: GCC 2120 Portfolio 1)

GCC2250 Web/Interactive Media 3 (3 credits)
This course builds on the course work covered in GCC 2150. The capabilities of different web and interactive applications will continue to be explored. Students will finalize their webfolios, and design other various promotional web and interactive projects. (Prerequisite GCC 2150 Web/Interactive Media 2)

GCC2261 Production Work Flow 2 (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of GCC2161 - Production Work Flow 1. Students will work on production projects that will incorporate all phases of graphic communications from design to workflow to production to finishing. Fourth semester Graphic Communications students prepare materials to promote their annual spring display of work through various communication methods. Students continue to formulate their problem-solving, teambuilding and lifelong learning skills through this course. (Prerequisites: GCC 2161 Production Work Flow 1)

GCC2275 Special Problems (1 - 4 credits)
The student will propose and produce a project in their area of interest. (Prerequisite: GCC 1220 Graphic Software 2 OR advisor approval)

GCC2290 Graphic Communications Internship (1 - 3 credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the Graphic Communications field. Each internship is an individualized experience. A plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site to provide experience related to the skills and knowledge acquired in the program. This plan is based on the college's and the program's core competencies. One credit of Internship is equal to 48 hours. (Prerequisites: GCC 1210 Drawing for Graphic Designers; GCC 1220 Graphic Software 2; and GCC 1260 Printing Processes; OR advisor approval)

GEOG - Geography

GEOG100 Elements of Geography (3 credits)
The course will answer the question "What is Geography?" Therefore, this course provides students with an introduction to the basic themes of geography. The scope and nature of geographic inquiry is used to explore topics about the physical and human characteristics of the Earth's surface. Special emphasis is placed on the significance of humans, environment, and cultural processes in the organization of space on the earth's surface. Natural and cultural landscapes are very important components of this course and students will examine physiographic regions, climates, demography, and urban areas. Also, different environmental issues will be discussed. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

GEOG101 Introduction to Physical Geography (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to physical geography that systematically examines the spatial patterns and interrelationships among physical elements at the earth's surface. Students will study the earth's physical environment, its systems, and the physical processes that drive them through study of weather, climate, natural vegetation, soil, and landforms. However, these topics are not just discussed independently since the course concentrates on understanding the integration of these areas of the natural world. Geography focuses on human activities, and so the course will highlight some of the basic interactions between human activity and the natural environment. Current issues will be discussed and a scientific foundation provided for understanding global warming and other critical environmental issues. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3, 10: Natural Sciences, People & the Environment)

GEOG103 Introduction to Cultural Geography (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to cultural geography through the study of global patterns of many aspects of human culture, including population, migration, folk and popular culture, language, religion, ethnicity, political geography, development, agriculture, industry, services, urban patterns, and resource issues. Students will examine all of these and several other issues during the semester. Students will stress the variation in the cultural landscape and critically analyze several current problems facing modern society, such as overpopulation and differences between societies. Cultural geography is focused on those things that are human-created. Therefore, the basic theme addressed throughout the course will be to discover where and why human activities are located where they are found. Students will participate in the discussions and will exchange ideas that will help them to better understand the diversity of the cultural landscape and the similarities and differences between different social groups. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

GEOG104 Introduction to Weather and Climate (3 credits)
This course will serve as an introduction to the basic atmospheric processes described as weather. Topics including atmospheric pressure, winds, temperature patterns, humidity and precipitation, and severe weather phenomena will be examined. The spatial distribution of global climates and climate change will also be explored. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3, 10: Natural Sciences, People & The Environment)

GEOG105 World Regional Geography (3 credits)
This course will allow students to examine the political, economic, cultural, and physical differences between the world's major regions. These differences will help foster a better understanding of how world citizens interact in the global age. Place-location literacy will be emphasized to enable students to apply information learned in this course beyond the confines of the classroom. Map and data interpretation skills will also be learned. An appreciation of world current events will be developed throughout the semester. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 8, 10: Global Perspective, People & The Environment)

GEOG200 Special Topics in Geography: (3 credits)
Students will explore a region to learn its unique characteristics and how its physical geography and human geography are closely linked within that region. The focus will be on real-world and hands-on activities that will use an inquiry-driven approach to learning. When applicable, geographic tools, such as GIS (Geographic Information Systems), remote sensing, and map skills, will be presented. The course will have a research component. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences)

GIS - Geographic Information Systems

GIS2840 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4 credits)
This course covers the theory and use of computer software for the collection, analysis, and communication of geographic information. This course will use ArcGIS software, which was developed by Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) as a tool to create, manage and manipulate spatial data within a GIS. (Prerequisite: None)

GIS2841 Intermediate GIS (4 credits)
This course is a continuation of CTLS 2840 Introduction to Geographic Information systems, with emphasis placed on continued learning of the manipulation, and management of spatial data, and understanding of relationships between features and database attributes. In addition, this course will cover the development of web mapping components that can be used to communicate information to those who need access to spatial data via the internet. The primary software used in this course will be (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.) ESRI ArcGIS Software and extensions. (Prerequisite: GIS 2840)

GIS2842 Field Mapping with GPS (4 credits)
This course covers the strategies of using mapping grade and survey grade GPS equipment and software to electronically collect spatial features for use in the development of GIS and CAD projects. (Prerequisite: GIS 2840 or consent of the Instructor)

GIS2843 GIS Practicum (1 - 4 credits)
This variable credit course expands upon the knowledge students gained in previous geospatial technology courses and serves to hone their GIS skills. Students will have the opportunity to design, develop, and implement a GIS-based solution in response to a defined problem and present their results. (Prerequisite: GIS 2841 or instructor consent)

GIS2844 GIS Internship (1 - 4 credits)
This variable credit course is one of the capstones of the GIS certificate program, where upon the students are provided a real world working atmosphere with area partners, such as state, county, and local governments, and consulting agencies. Students in this course work on assignments as requested by the governing agency and will be directed by the course instructor. (Prerequisite: GIS 2841 or consent of the Instructor)

GIS2845 Introduction to Remote Sensing (4 credits)
This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and fundamentals of remote sensing. Digital image processing techniques and aerial photo interpretation will be reviewed and applied to practical problems through the use of various lab activities. (Prerequisite: None)

HC - Health Core

HC1000 Medical Terminology (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the language of medicine that is used in the health care profession. The student will learn to spell, pronounce, define, and interpret medical terminology related to body structure, disease, diagnosis, and treatment. (Prerequisites: None)

HC1001 Advanced Medical Terminology (3 credits)
This course is the continuation of HC 1000. Review of medical terminology as it pertains to the body systems that were covered previously with emphasis on developing an understanding of the pathological terminology used in the language of medicine. Specialty areas within the allied health professional fields of respiratory therapy, physical therapy, pathology, radiology, anesthesia, pharmacology, and others will be introduced. (Prerequisite: HC 1000)

HC1500 Healthcare Foundation: Introduction to Health Careers (1 - 3 credits)
This course will focus on the requirements needed by healthcare workers to effectively work in a variety of healthcare settings with a diverse population of clients. Students will explore workplace skills such as accountability and responsibility, standard of dress, workplace behavior, approaches to assist clients, and expectations of teams and team members. Also included is discussion about how healthcare workers can impact the quality of health care and balance their work and personal life to maintain personal wellness. In addition, students will examine the emotional, spiritual, and social needs of clients as well as the type of care needed by different populations. The course also provides a framework for healthcare workers to interact with diverse clients and staff. Included are belief systems, cultural practices, and respect and sensitivity to cultural, gender, and age issues. (Prerequisite: None)

HC1510 Special Topics in Healthcare (1 - 3 credits)
Special Topics in Healthcare will help students understand how various healthcare trends, policies, and procedures impact providers, healthcare professionals, and patients. Students will explore a broad range of healthcare concepts through specific topics of relevance. The instructor has chosen subject matter that relates to today's healthcare trends in areas such as technology, government and institutional policies, education, and treatment practices. This course is a variable credit course to accommodate the credit needs of the student in various healthcare programs. (Prerequisite: None)

HC1525 Health Care Core Foundations (1 - 4 credits)
This variable credit course will focus on the requirements needed by healthcare professionals to effectively work in a variety of healthcare settings and explore workplace skills such as accountability and responsibility, workplace behavior, approaches to assist clients, and expectations of teams and team members. This course provides a framework for healthcare workers to interact with diverse clients and staff, including belief systems, cultural practices, and respect and sensitivity to cultural, gender, and age issues. Identifying elements of communication and how those elements can develop into effective communication within the healthcare setting is a key focus, as well as learning when and how to utilize those skills in challenging situations. Health care ethics will be addressed and target ethical decision-making and personal and professional values. Legal issues in healthcare will round out the course, concentrating on healthcare laws and social media in healthcare. Healthcare safety and standards precautions will be incorporated, as well as personal wellness for the healthcare professional. This variable credit course was designed as a part of the Minnesota Health Care Core Curriculum. (Prerequisites: None)

HC1550 Electronic Health Records (2 credits)
With the implementation of the electronic health record in today's healthcare environment, it's essential for students entering the healthcare field to understand this technology and how it relates to work in the industry. This course is designed as an introduction to the history of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and concepts behind the structure of electronic medical recording systems. Additionally, it will provide students the opportunity to use multiple functions of an educational electronic health record. (Prerequisites: None)

HC1914 Anatomy & Physiology/Disease Conditions I (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide two approaches to assist the student in learning about the human body. The first is in developing a basic understanding of the normal structure and function of the human body and secondly to discuss disease processes that affect each body system. (Prerequisite: HC 1000)

HC1920 ICD-9-CM Coding I (3 credits)
This course is the first in the introduction of the coding rules and conventions for coding diseases and procedures and in-depth study of ICD-9-CM. This system is used in all health care facilities for diagnosis and in hospitals for coding of procedures. (Prerequisite: None)

HC1924 Anatomy & Physiology Disease Conditions II (4 credits)
This course is a continuation of HC 1914 Anatomy/Physiology/Disease Conditions I with emphasis on the pathophysiology of the human body. The student will apply previous knowledge in medical terminology and structure and function of the human body. This course prepares the student in understanding the abnormalities and diseases the affect the organs and organs systems. (Prerequisites: HC 1914, 1000)

HC1925 ICD-9-CM Coding II (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of HC 1920. The course covers the ICD-9-CM diagnostic and procedural coding in depth for both inpatient and outpatient facilities. It compares the reimbursement systems and for both facilities and introduces the compliance plans for both facilities and is a continuation of the coding conventions for inpatient and outpatient settings. (Prerequisites: HC 1000, 1920)

HC1928 CPT Coding I (3 credits)
This course is the introduction of CPT coding and provides and in-depth review of the coding and reimbursement system used in outpatient facilities and physician billing. The course reviews all CPT sections and sub-sections. The student will learn the importance of physician documentation and impact of CPT coding on reimbursement and for both the medical facility and the physician. The student will gain knowledge of medical procedures and services and the importance of understanding medical terminology. (Prerequisite: HC 1000)

HC1930 ICD-9-CM Coding III - CPT Coding II (4 credits)
This course is a continuation of HC 1920, 1925, 1928 with an emphasis on coding ICD-9-CM and CPT for physician billing/outpatient facilities and in-patient discharges. It combines all previous coding experiences with regard to reimbursement and compliance for Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG's) and the Relative Based Resource Value Scale (RBRVS). The course provides for coding experience in mental health facilities (cross-walk with DSM-IV), long-term facilities, and Ambulatory Surgery Centers (ASC's). (Prerequisites: HC 1000, 1001, 1914, 1920, 1925, 1928, 2930)

HC1934 Trained Medication Aide (2 credits)
This course includes the study of legal requirements concerning drugs in the medication administration process of the Trained Medication Aide (TMA). Information for oral and topical medications are studied. The medication administration process is applied to know drug action, usual doses, undesired effects, and special considerations for a variety of drugs associated with body systems. Terminology related to medication administration and reference sources (drug books) are used. Students will not administer medications to real clients but will learn basic guidelines for medication administration and practice using manikins. This course will include online content and laboratory practice to promote safe medication administration. (Prerequisite: Current in the Minnesota Department of Health Nursing Assistant Registry and must be 18 years old)

HC2930 Introduction to Health Care/Health Information (4 credits)
This course reviews the evolution of health care and the health insurance industry. The course will introduce the types of healthcare facilities and discusses concepts of healthcare finance. The student will gain knowledge of the major types of healthcare insurance, medical record systems, confidentiality, and the legal aspects of medical records and health care. The course reviews medical documentation and the standardization of forms used in the health record and will review both manual and electronic medical records (EMR) and how each provides the documentation of care provided to patients. (Prerequisites: None)

HCTC - Nursing-Nursing Assistant

HCTC1886 Nursing Assistant (4 credits)
This 4 credit course meets federal and state criteria for eligibility to take the state test to become a NA, R/HHA. It introduces concepts of basic human needs, the health/illness continuum and focuses on preparing the student to safely perform basic nursing skills needed to function as a Nursing Assistant or Home Health Aide. (Prerequisites: None)

HCTC1889 Nursing Assistant Theory (3 credits)
This course meets federal and state criteria for eligibility to take the state test to become an NAR (Nursing Assistant, Registered). Additionally, the course meets the requirements for Basic Nursing 101, a prerequisite for the Practical Nursing Program. It introduces the concepts of basic human needs, the health/illness continuum and focuses on preparing the student to demonstrate basic nursing skills needed to function as a Nursing Assistant. After completion of HCTC 1889, the student is eligible to take the CNA (Certified Nursing Assistant) test to gain certification. Upon successful completion of the test, the student will be placed on the Minnesota Nursing Assistant Registry. The student in this course is NOT eligible to take the test for HHA (Home Health Aid), since it is not part of instruction in this course.

HCTC1890 Home Health Aid/Homemaker (1 credits)
This course prepares students to be eligible for employment at a home health agency, public health or assisted living facility. Successful completion prepares the student to practice at the Home Health Aide/Homemaker (HHA) level. Completion of the Minnesota Department of Health Nursing Assistant course is required before enrollment into the HHA course because this course builds upon knowledge gained from the Nursing Assistant course. The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of infection control; basic human needs; communication; personal cares; legal issues and care across the lifespan as it pertains to the home health setting. Upon satisfactory completion of the Home Health Aide course, the student is eligible to take the federal Home Health Aide Exam. (Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the Minnesota Department of Health Nursing Assistant course. 18 years of age or older)

HEMS - Emergency Medical Services

HEMS1200 Emergency Medical Technician Initial (160 Hours) (7 credits)
This course will provide the participant the necessary didactic and cognitive skills to enter the Basic Life Support Ambulance occupation arena as an EMT. Upon successful completion of this course the participant will be able to take the National registry of Emergency Medical Technician written and practical examination, administered by the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board. The course follows the guidelines established by the United States Department of Transportation and meets the requirements set forth by the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board. This course is a requirement to progress into the Intensive Care Paramedic Program of study. (Prerequisite: Student must be 18 years of age by the start of the course.)

HEMS1202 EMT Practical Skills Review & Exam (1 - credits)
This course is designed for second year paramedic students who are using the 48 hour EMSRB continuing education option for recertification. This course will review the basic skills for the EMT practical exam and also test those skills.

HEMS1220 Emergency Medical Technician Refresher (24 Hours) (2 credits)
This course will provide the participant the necessary didactic and cognitive skills to continue in the Basic Life Support Ambulance occupation arena as an EMT. Upon successful completion of this course, the participant will be able to take the practical examination administered by the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board. The course follows the guidelines established by the guidelines established by the United States Department of Transportation and meets the requirements set forth by the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board.

HEMS1300 First Responder Initial (48 Hours) (2 credits)
This 48-hour course provides emergency care training to fire/rescue personnel, law enforcement officers, industrial safety personnel, especially when they are the first on the scene of injuries and medical problems. The course is approved by the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board and Post-Board approved. As a result of 1999 Minnesota Legislation, prospective First Responder students who have committed misdemeanors, gross misdemeanors or felonies may not qualify to be certified as First Responders. (Prerequisite: None)

HEMS1320 First Responder Refresher (16 Hours) (1 credits)
This course is designed to provide the First Responder at the scene of a medical emergency the necessary knowledge and skills to manage patient care until the arrival of ambulance personnel. This course is for individuals who are currently First Responders needing to refresh to maintain certification. This course meets or exceeds the guidelines set forth by the United States Department of Transportation and the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board.

HEMS1321 First Responder Refresher (16 Hours) (1 - credits)
This 16-hour course provides refresher training for state certified First Responders who need to refresh every two years. It is intended as an update on revised emergency care skills and techniques for recertification. The course is approved by the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board and Post-Board approved. Certification is recognized for a two-year period. As a result of 1999 Minnesota Legislation, prospective First Responder students who have committed misdemeanors, gross misdemeanors or felonies may not qualify to be certified as First Responders. (Prerequisite: State Certified First Responder).

HEMS2825 3 Hr. Athletic Injuries (1 - credits)
This course will teach the learning more information about athletic injuries and how to treat them.

HEMS2830 8-Hour OSHA Emergency Care/First Aid (1 - credits)
This training course in emergency care includes topics for initial treatment of injuries and medical emergencies which may occur in the workplace. This course meets OSHA and MSHA standards and certification is issued for a two-year period. This course does not include any CPR training.

HEMS2831 3-Hour OSHA Emergency Care/First Aid (1 - credits)
Learn the proper immediate first steps of treating workplace injuries and medical emergencies. Covering those first-action topics; this course satisfies OSHA and MSHA standards with certification issued for a two-year period. The course does not include CPR training.

HEMS2838 8-Hour AHA CPR Instructor Initial (1 - credits)
This is the course you need to become an AHA instructor for CPR, AED and First Aid. This training expands your teaching methodologies, provides you with the background and in-depth understanding of the material you'll be teaching and sharpens your skills as an instructor for all of the AHA's Basic Life Support CPR courses. Prerequisites: 1) Must have a current AHA Healthcare Provider CPR card; 2) Must align with an AHA Training Center, purchase a BLS Instructor Manual, read the BLS Instructor Student Workbook; order and complete the online BLS Instructor Course Essentials, print the certificate of completion to provide a copy to the College to take the classroom portion of the class; 3) Must attend an in-person class with our AHA Training Center Faculty. Once you have completed this class, you will be monitored by Training Center Faculty as you teach your first course. Please note: The BLS Instructor Card is issued by the Training Center you are aligned with, and only after all steps and corresponding paperwork are completed.

HEMS2840 8-Hour AHA CPR Instructor Recertification (1 - credits)
This class provides a skills refresher for participants with a current Basic Life Support (BLS) CPR Instructor Certification. This class will enable you to renew your certification with the American Heart Association and your Training Center. You must have also taught four (4) classes in the previous recertification period and be in good standing with the AHA Minnesota Affiliate.

HEMS2841 6-Hour Healthcare Provider CPR Recertification (1 - credits)
Still CPR-certified but want a refresher? This course is for those certified during the previous two years and covers the current National CPR guidelines for adult, child and infant CPR, obstructed airway techniques and automatic defibrillation procedures. A new 2-year American Heart Association card will be issued.

HEMS2843 5-Hour Healthcare Provider CPR Recertification (1 - credits)
This course is designed as a refresher training for persons certified during the previous two years. Content includes current National CPR guidelines for Adult, Child and Infant CPR and obstructed airway techniques as well as automatic defibrillation procedures. A 2 year American Heart Association card will be issued upon course completion.

HEMS2845 3-Hour AdultSaver CPR (1 - credits)
This course will show you not only how to administer CPR, but to recognize the signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke. Youll learn how to perform CPR, clear airway obstructions and use the automatic defibrillator. The course will also cover risk factors for heart disease and stroke. A 2-year American Heart Association card will be issued.

HEMS2855 8-Hour Healthcare Provider CPR - Initial (1 - credits)
Designed for emergency care/health care providers, this course covers the current national CPR guidelines for adult, child and infant CPR, obstructed airway techniques and automatic defibrillation procedures. A 2-year American Heart Association card will be issued.

HEMS2870 4-Hour Pediatric CPR (1 - credits)
This course includes skills for CPR and relief of obstructed airways for infants 0-1 year old and children 1-8 years old. This course certification meets requirements for licensed daycare providers and also valuable for parents and others in charge of care for children. Participants receive a 2-year certification card upon successful completion.

HEMS2872 Pediatric CPR & 1st Aid (1 - credits)
This course will combine both CPR and first aid skills. The CPR portion includes skills for CPR and relief of obstructed airways for infants 0-1 year old and children 1-8 years old. This course certification meets requirements for licensed daycare providers and also valuable for parents and others in charge of care for children. For the first aid portion, the course will also cover some basic first aid skills which would be needed for day care providers. Skills to include bleeding, shock, falls, seizures, heat & cold emergencies, and poisonings. Participants receive a 2-year certification card upon successful completion.

HEMS2873 Pediatric CPR & 1st Aid (1 - credits)
This course will combine both CPR and first aid skills. The CPR portion includes skills for CPR and relief of obstructed airways for infants 0-1 year old and children 1-8 years old. This course certification meets requirements for licensed daycare providers and also valuable for parents and others in charge of care for children. For the first aid portion, the course will also cover some basic first aid skills which would be needed for day care providers. Skills to include bleeding, shock, falls, seizures, heat & cold emergencies, and poisonings. Participants receive a 2-year certification card upon successful completion.

HEMS2874 Tot Saver CPR & 1st Aid (1 - credits)
This course includes skills for CPR and relief of obstructed airways for infants 0-1 year old and children 1-8 years old. This course certification meets requirements for licensed daycare providers and also valuable for parents and others in charge of care for children. Participants receive a 2-year certification card upon successful completion.

HEMS2880 OSHA Emergency Care & First Aid w/ AdultSaver CPR (1 - credits)
This training course in emergency care includes topics for initial treatment of injuries and medical emergencies which may occur in the workplace. This course does not include any CPR training.

HHC - Health Courses (Hour Based)

HHC2000 Trained Medication Aide Training (1 - credits)
This program, formerly medication administration for unlicensed personnel, is for training unlicensed persons to administer medications under the supervision of a licensed professional nurse. Meets MN Board of Nursing standards for TMA Program. Prerequisites for a TMA: - Must be a Registered Nursing Assistant - Must be 18 years of age when registering for certification - Must pass criminal background study

HHC3100 Mental Health Basics for Front Line Workers (1 - credits)
What Participants will Gain Skills for safely working with people with mental health issues as a front line worker. A greater understanding of mental health issues, types and treatments. Learn the basics of community based care and resources for mental illness. Gain information about cultural aspects of mental health care. Learn about the role of prevention and early intervention. 4 Continuing Education Hours provided.

HHC3105 Mental Health Basics for Front Line Workers (1 - credits)
What Participants will Gain Skills for safely working with people with mental health issues as a front line worker. A greater understanding of mental health issues, types and treatments. Learn the basics of community based care and resources for mental illness. Gain information about cultural aspects of mental health care. Learn about the role of prevention and early intervention. 8 Continuing Education Hours provided.

HHC5001 ICD-10 for Existing Coding Professionals - CODESMART (1 - credits)
This dynamic online training program will teach current medical coding professionals to be proficient with using the new ICD-10-CM/PCS coding systems. With the successful completion of this program, the individual will gain new knowledge and enhance their skill sets.

HHP - Health & Human Performance

HHP100 Introduction to Health (3 credits)
This course introduces students to basic health information and the essential concepts of health which are necessary to improve health literacy. Students will work to develop the essential skills needed to adopt, practice and maintain health enhancing behaviors. Topics may include general health topics such as: drug use and misuse, nutrition and fitness basics, disease prevention, stress management, reproductive and sexual health, complementary and alternative medicine, and consumerism. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher)

HHP101 Health and the Environment (3 credits)
This course will examine the impact of complex environmental challenges on human health. This course focuses on the ecological model of health and wellness, a framework that addresses the interrelationships between individuals and their environment, and how these relationships influence the choices that affect health. The course will address the impact of the environment on human risk for common health concerns, to include cancer, heart disease, mental health, infectious disease, and nutrition/fitness. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 10: People and the Environment)

HHP102 Introduction to Fitness and Wellness (3 credits)
This course will be an introduction to a path in fitness and wellness by exploring core concepts, real life student case studies, and action steps to help student develop a personal lifetime fitness and wellness program. The course concentrates on health-related physical fitness components with beneficial information about wellness. It also focuses on motivation and behavior modification with an emphasis on teaching individuals how to take control of their personal fitness, health, and lifestyle habits while exploring occupations in the fitness and wellness profession. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher)

HHP103 Nutrition in Exercise and Performance (2 credits)
This course provides the latest sports nutrition information that can help athletes and fitness enthusiasts achieve their athletic goals. This course covers the basics of sports nutrition, energy metabolism, the main nutrients, nutritional ergogenic aids and dietary supplements, and weight management. It also focuses on applying those basics to endurance athletes, strength/power athletes, team sports, and special populations. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher)

HHP104 Concepts of Fitness (2 credits)
This course will provide students with current information, tools, and guidelines to implement and adhere to a lifetime physical fitness and wellness program. The course will encourage students to take a critical look at their current behaviors in order to help them identify and abandon negative habits and adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. It also focuses on how to take control of personal lifestyles and make changes to promote overall health and wellness. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher)

HHP121 Topics in Aerobic Conditioning: (1 credits)
Students will participate in a variety of aerobic conditioning fitness activities that promote improved cardiovascular fitness. Topics may include but are not limited to: walking, running, kickboxing, step aerobics, dance-based aerobics and/or a combination of these activities. Students will learn the basic concepts related to fitness and health, and particularly those related to aerobic conditioning. Students will be able to recognize behaviors that lead to a healthy lifestyle and prevent disease, illness and disability. Students will monitor and track their own cardiovascular fitness level. Students will incorporate a sense of appreciation for and a commitment to fitness and wellness in everyday life and create a personalized plan of action for continuing behaviors that promote a healthy lifestyle. This course may be repeated for credit. (Prerequisite: None)

HHP122 Topics in Mind/Body Fitness: (1 credits)
Students will participate in mind body fitness activities that promote increased flexibility, core strength as well as mental focus and relaxation. Topics may include but are not limited to: different styles of yoga, Pilates, tai chi, dance-based activities and/or a combination of these activities. Students will study and understand basic health and fitness concepts as well as concepts related to mind body fitness. Students will be able to recognize behaviors that lead to a healthy lifestyle and prevent disease, illness and disability. Students will monitor and track their own core strength and flexibility fitness levels. Students will incorporate a sense of appreciation for and a commitment to fitness and wellness in everyday life and create a personalized plan of action for continuing fitness activities that promote a healthy lifestyle. This class can be repeated for credit. (Prerequisite: None)

HHP123 Topics in Strength Training: (1 credits)
Students will participate in a variety of strength training activities that promote improved muscular endurance and strength in major muscle groups. Topics may include but are not limited to: the use of resistance bands, free weights, weighted bars, body weight and/or a combination of these activities. Students will learn the basic concepts related to fitness and health, and particularly those related to safe and effective resistance training. Students will be able to recognize behaviors that lead to a healthy lifestyle and prevent disease, illness and disability. Students will monitor and track their own muscular endurance and strength fitness level. Students will incorporate a sense of appreciation for and a commitment to fitness and wellness in everyday life and create a personalized plan of action for continuing behaviors that promote a healthy lifestyle. This course may be repeated for credit. (Prerequisite: None)

HHP124 Topics in Lifetime Fitness Activities: (1 credits)
Students will participate in lifetime fitness activities to promote maintenance of an active lifestyle throughout the lifecycle. Topics may include but are not limited to: bowling, tennis, soccer, volleyball, golf, skiing, softball, basketball, martial arts, etc. Students will learn the basic concepts related to fitness and health, and particularly those related to lifetime activities. Students will incorporate a sense of appreciation for and a commitment to fitness and wellness in everyday life. This course may be repeated for credit. (Prerequisite: None)

HHP126 Topics in Aerobic Conditioning - Cycling (1 credits)
Students will participate in cycling activities to promote improved cardiovascular fitness. Students will learn the basic concepts related to cycling, fitness, and health. Students will be able to recognize behaviors that lead to a healthy lifestyle and prevent disease, illness and disability. Students will monitor and track their own cardiovascular fitness level. Students will incorporate a sense of appreciation for and a commitment to fitness and wellness in everyday life and create a personalized plan of action for continuing behaviors that promote a healthy lifestyle. There is no prerequisite for this course. This course may be repeated for credit. (Prerequisite: None)

HHP127 Topics in Mind/Body Fitness Pilates (1 credits)
Students will participate in mind body fitness activities that promote self-awareness, flexibility, core and overall strength, mental focus, and relaxation. Topics may include but are not limited to: Pilates, core conditioning, functional training, yoga, and other fitness activities. Students will understand basic health and fitness concepts related to mind body fitness and core strength. Students will be able to recognize behaviors that lead to a healthy lifestyle and prevent disease, illness, and disability. Students will monitor and tract their own fitness and wellness levels. Students will incorporate a sense of appreciation for and a commitment to fitness and wellness in everyday life and create a personalized plan of action for continuing mind/body fitness activities that promote a healthy lifestyle. This class can be repeated for credit. Supplies needed for class include a Pilates mat. (Prerequisite: None)

HHP128 Topics in Mind/Body Fitness Yoga (1 credits)
Students will participate in mind body fitness activities that promote self-awareness, flexibility, strength, mental focus, and relaxation. Topics may include but are not limited to: different styles of yoga, Pilates, tai chi, and other mind/body activities. Students will understand basic health and fitness concepts related to mind body fitness. Students will be able to recognize behaviors that lead to a healthy lifestyle and prevent disease, illness, and disability. Students will monitor and track their own fitness and wellness levels. Students will incorporate a sense of appreciation for and a commitment to fitness and wellness in everyday life and create a personalized plan of action for continuing mind/body fitness activities that promote a healthy lifestyle. This class can be repeated for credit. Supplies needed for class include a yoga mat. (Prerequisite: None)

HHP205 Drug Education (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of drugs and drug use, as well as current issues and themes regarding both individual health and social function. Topics include drug use from a psychological, emotional, behavioral, pharmacological, legal, and medical perspective. This course also includes an analysis of the personal decisions regarding use/non-use of drugs to the topics of social norms, politics, economics, crime, prevention and treatment. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.)

HHP210 Stress Management (3 credits)
This course exposes students to a holistic approach to stress management. Students will learn the basic principles, theories, coping skills and relaxation techniques to effectively manage personal stress. Topics include: the effects of the stress response, the relationship between stress and health/disease, the identification of personal stress levels, the application of coping skills and relaxation techniques, and the understanding of the importance of personal responsibility for health. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.)

HIST - History

HIST120 U.S. History I (4 credits)
This course surveys the history of America from the contributions of the indigenous indian people through the Colonial Era (17th and 18th centuries) to the American Revolution and Early Republic (18th and 19th centuries). It examines how historical American culture, institutions, and events influence the present United States in the latter part of the twentieth century. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

HIST121 U. S. History II (4 credits)
This course surveys the history of America from the Civil War and Reconstruction, through the New South and the New West, Industrialization, Populism and Progressivism, World War I, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, Cold War America, the 1960's, Vietnam and Beyond. It examines how historical American culture, institutions, and events influence the present United States in the latter part of the twentieth century. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

HIST160 World History I (4 credits)
This course is a survey of world history examining ancient, classical, and medieval civilizations prior to the emergence of the West as a world power (c. 3500 BCE - 1450 CE). The course explores how environmental, economic, political, social, religious and other intellectual and cultural factors combined in different ways to influence the development of major world regions - Africa, EurAsia, and the Americas. The goal is for students to understand how fundamental institutions and cultural norms of different world regions developed out of their own internal environments as well as in response to developments and influences from other cultural systems and historical forces. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

HIST161 World History II: The Rise of the West (4 credits)
The history of world civilizations from 1500 C.E. through World War I, the rise of Europe, the age of revolutions, colonization and resistance to colonization, industrialization and its effects on people living in both imperialist and colonized societies and the connection between industrialization and imperialism as causes of World War I. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

HIST162 World History III: The Twentieth Century (4 credits)
This course will present a history of world civilizations from 1900 to the present. Course topics will include the rise of national liberation movements beginning with the Boxer Rebellion of 1900, decolonization, total war, holocausts, globalization, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, the Cold War, terrorism, fundamentalism and the rise of the United States as the only superpower at the end of the 20th century. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

HIST205 Special Topics in History: (1 - 4 credits)
Any HIST class has been specially designed by an SCC History instructor to appeal to SCC students. The instructor has chosen the subject material related to his/her interests, students' interests, or his/her teaching expertise. (Prerequisites: Any HIST course or instructor permission) (MNTC 5, 8: History & the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

HLTH - Health

HLTH1000 Medical Terminology (1 credits)
This course teaches students to recognize and build medical terms after learning the meaning of word parts. The course is based on a systems approach. Students also learn how to interpret and use common medical abbreviations and symbols. With instructor approval, this course may be taken on independent study. (Prerequisite: None)

HLTH1950 CPR (1 credits)
This course covers the skills of infant, child and adult single and two rescue CPR as well as relief of foreign body airway obstruction procedures for infant, child and adult. Automated external defibrillators, bag-valve-masks and pocket masks are also used. Signs and symptoms of vascular disease are discussed. This meets the current criteria of the American Heart Association guidelines. (Prerequisites: None)

HLTH1952 First Aid (1 credits)
This course includes emergency care training for initial treatment of illness and injury. Patient assessment, bleeding control, shock management, soft tissue injury, orthopedic injury, diabetic problems, seizures, poisons, heat exposure and cold exposure are some of the topics covered in the course. This course is appropriate for anyone who may need to render immediate care. The topics covered do meet the course requirements for OSHA and MSHA first aid training.

HLTH1954 Safety (1 credits)
This course includes basic OSHA safety standards. Hearing protection, eye protection, back injuries, lockout/tagout procedures, Hazard Communication Standard, bloodborne pathogens and substance use and abuse in the workplace are examples of topics covered in the course. The consequences of disregarding safety practices are explored. (Prerequisites: None)

HSER - Human Services

HSER1000 Introduction to Counseling (3 credits)
This course provides students with an introduction to the skills of counseling. Students will learn how to identify and explore feelings, set up a positive environment, learn effective helping skills, and explore treatment issues. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the principles of interviewing and on the demonstrated application of these skills by the student. Students examine how these skills affect relationship building and therapeutic interventions. Guided encounters, discussions, presentations, and assigned projects will be utilized. (Prerequisites: None)

HSER1010 Disability and Person Centered Planning (4 credits)
This course gives an overview of how service providers work with one another in order to assure the delivery of optimal supports. It will introduce you to a variety of strategies and techniques used to facilitate person centered planning for individualized and real life goals. Topics covered in the course include: the use of support teams (effective team work, team dynamics, communication skills and problem solving skills); working with families; direct service provider roles and responsibilities; diversity, confidentiality, and advocacy issues; the civil and disability rights movement; interdisciplinary team planning processes; and use of the Planning Alternate Tomorrows with Hope (PATH) planning system to promote minimally invasive care and support strategies. (Prerequisites: None)

HSER1020 Behavioral Interventions (3 credits)
This course provides an in-depth look at positive supports and interventions for those with challenging behaviors, and reviews human development, learning styles, and teaching techniques. Additionally, analysis of a wide variety of multiple positive behavior strategies will be conducted. This course reviews the philosophy of behavior modification and theory, incident and accident reports, and documentation requirements. Emphasis is placed on understanding and supporting an individual's learning barriers by using positive approaches, as well as understanding and responding to behaviors with positive supports. Students will explore how their individual values and personal experiences influence the ways in which they respond to and assess individual's abilities. Students will also acquire knowledge and skills relating to functional and specialized assessments, the importance of using non-aversive interventions and the selection and use of appropriate non-aversive behavioral supports. Methods for designing, planning, developing, and implementing skill orientated support plans are taught in this course. (Prerequisites: None)

HSER1030 Poverty (3 credits)
This course examines the causes and consequences of poverty. Students will learn the terminology and analyze the philosophical, conceptual, and theoretical frameworks utilized by diverse agents to understand and address poverty. Specific interventions are explored and analyzed. The goal of this course is to develop social work professionals who understand the problem of poverty from a variety of disciplines, understand key concepts, and will be prepared and willing to intervene regardless of area of practice. (Prerequisite: None)

HSER2000 Field Experience (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a practical experience within the social services field. Each field experience is individualized and students will be placed within a social service agency by the instructor based on the student's interest, skill set, and agency availability. The focus of field experience is to give the students experience with a client population and practice modeling social work values and ethics. Students will complete field experience their last semester. (Prerequisites: Instructor approval required)

HSS - Health Support Specialist

HSS1000 Introduction to the Health Support Specialist (3 credits)
This course will provide students with an orientation to aging services role of the Health Support Specialist (HSS). The course will also focus on the history of aging services and the concept of Culture Change and Person Directed Living. Topics will include; implementing person directed living in the health care setting and participation in a mentorship and apprenticeship model of training. Effective communication skills needed to work with families, residents, and other healthcare workers will be explored. This course will provide an introduction to the computer skills used for the HSS curriculum. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program)

HSS1001 Health Support Specialist in Meaningful Activities (1 credits)
This activity course will provide direct caregivers with the fundamental skills, knowledge, and resources for engaging residents in meaningful activity programs, groups, and one to one's during their daily care giving routines. In this course student will also be given the opportunities for residents to engage in activities that meet their needs and interests which will provide quality of life and meaningful living for those living in a healthcare setting. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program)

HSS1002 Health Support Specialist in Memory Care (1 credits)
This course will explore the aging process as it relates to the resident who has memory loss and/or dementia related diagnosis. Topics will include; changes affecting communication skills and daily routines, recognizing common behaviors associated with memory loss, and implementing behavior interventions. The course will also introduce the student to methods for involving the family in decisions that provide purposeful living for the resident. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program)

HSS1003 Health Support Specialist in Culinary Care (1 credits)
This course will provide the student with basic culinary information that will help them purchase, plan, prepare and deliver a nutritionally adequate diet for the resident. Principles of infection control and basic nutrition will also be covered. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program)

HSS1004 Health Support Specialist in Physiological Care (1 credits)
This course introduces the student to the basic body structure and function during the aging process. Each body system is explored for the influences and implication of aging, common disorders, completion of body functions and common disease processes. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program)

HSS1005 Health Support Specialist in Psychosocial Care (1 credits)
In this course student will develop greater awareness of the psychosocial and spiritual impact of aging and end-of-life care. Losses resulting from aging extend much deeper, are more challenging to measure and thus often go unnoticed or unattended. Students will examine the emotional, social and spiritual dimensions of holistic care as a HSS and how each can be influenced by transition and loss. Students will also explore ways to identify and support individual and family needs in each of these dimensions. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program)

HSS1006 Health Support Specialist in Environmental Services (1 credits)
This course will cover the basics in providing a clean and safe environment. Topics include basic housekeeping practices, laundering procedures and simple maintenance tasks required within the guidelines of facility policies and procedures and comply with OSHA, state and federal regulations. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program)

HUCF - Health Unit Coordinator

HUCF1101 Introduction to Health Unit Coordinating (1 credits)
This course includes the study of health care facility office and communication skills for nonclinical functions. Information about working with nursing and medical staff, other department staff, patients and visitors to contribute to the patients'/clients'/residents' care and well-being is explored. Telephone, written, electronic, and interpersonal communication is discussed, along with an emphasis in clerical support duties such as scheduling, faxing, and using various electronic devices. This course will help prepare students for the National Association of Health Unit Coordinators certification exam. (Prerequisites: None)

HUCF1200 Health Unit Coordinator Fundamentals (2 credits)
This course includes the study of health care facility office and communication skills for nonclinical functions. Information about working with nursing and medical staff, other department staff, patients and visitors to contribute to the patients'/clients'/residents' care and well being is emphasized. Communication of many kinds, including telephone, written, electronic, and interpersonal is a focus of the course. Students will also learn about clerical support duties such as typing, scheduling, faxing, and using the computer. Chart creation and interaction are also explored, both in paper format and in the Electronic Health Record. (Prerequisite: None)

HUCF1201 Health Unit Coordinator Procedures (3 credits)
This course expands on the role and job duties of the Health Unit Coordinator. Students will work with medical terminology and information necessary to comprehend and process a variety of orders within a health care setting. Examples of various kinds of orders are studied and many opportunities for practicing procedures is provided. Interaction with the patient chart and the Electronic Health Record continue to be explored, and multiple types of entries are practiced by students. Also, an overview of basic anatomy as well as disease and disorders will be covered to enhance understanding of orders and other elements of working in a health care setting. This course will focus on preparing students for certification through the National Association of Health Unity Coordinators. (Prerequisite: None)

HUCF1202 Health Unit Coordinator Internship (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the health unit coordinating field. Each internship is an individualized experience. A training plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site to provide and experience related to the skills and knowledge acquired in the HUC training program. Students must have completed the Anatomy and Physiology Disease Conditions, Medical Terminology and Applied Medical Terminology courses and the HUCF Fundamentals course. (Prerequisites: HUCF 1200 or Instructor approval)

HUM - Humanities

HUM100 Critical Thinking (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the importance of critical thinking in our culture today. Students will be provided with methods of critical thinking as well as relevant topics on which to practice their skills. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 2: Critical Thinking)

HUM111 Introduction to Film (4 credits)
This course is designed to introduce and acclimate students to film as a significant artistic, rhetorical and cultural medium. Course content focuses on film as an element of popular culture, as well as film genres, cinematic techniques and cinematic conventions. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 6: Humanities & Fine Arts)

HUM115 Global Connections Seminar (1 credits)
This seminar is designed to run concurrently with the 2010 Global Connections Conference at the North Mankato Campus of South Central College. Students will focus on preparing for the two-day conference in order to best utilize its learning opportunities. They will then attend and assist in the conference. Students will end the seminar by evaluating their learning experience. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 8: Global Perspective)

HUM121 Introduction to the Humanities (4 credits)
This course is an overview of the principal trends in Western thought and artistic expression from ancient times to the contemporary. Its aim is to foster an appreciation of how diverse ideas and works of art have contributed to our understanding of the universal human experience. Classroom instruction will be supplemented by guided tours of museums/exhibitions, and attendance at live performances of works pertinent to the course. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities & Fine Arts)

HUM122 Introduction to Humanities II (4 credits)
This course is an overview of the principal trends in Western thought and artistic expression from the Middle Ages transition into the Renaissance to the modern world. Its aim is to foster an appreciation of how diverse ideas and works of art have contributed to our understanding of the universal human experience. Classroom instruction will be supplemented by guided tours of museums/exhibitions, and attendance at live performances of works pertinent to the course. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities & Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

HUM130 China: Cultural Tradition and Change (3 credits)
Students in this course study the expression of Chinese values through intellectual and artistic pursuits and their influence on humans throughout the world. By taking a panoramic view of Chinese culture and civilization, students develop an appreciation for the treasure of Chinese achievements and the wealth of Chinese contributions to humanity. This view will also provide a context for the study of specific topics such as artistic expression, language, key points in history, traditions, human rights and conditions, and philosophy of health. Beyond an appreciation for Chinese culture, this introductory course aims to increase our understanding of China's presence, which has risen to a dominant position in global economic and political affairs. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 6 Humanities and Fine Arts and 8 Global Perspective).

HUM150 Global Connections Travel Seminar (1 credits)
The Global Connections Seminar is a one-credit course which prepares students for traveling with one or more instructors. Its specific content will be determined by the intended destination, and will include information on the history, geography, culture, art, and religion of that region. THE SEMINAR IS ONLY OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE SIGNED UP FOR THE TRIP. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities & Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

HUM205 Special Topics in the Humanities: (1 - 4 credits)
Any HUM class that has been specially designed by an SCC Humanities instructor to appeal to SCC students. The instructor has chosen the subject material related to his/her interests, students' interests, or his/her teaching expertise. (Prerequisite: All HUM 205 courses require a passing grade in ENGL 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities & Fine Arts)

HUM250 Global Connections Travel Seminar II (1 - 3 credits)
The Global Connections Seminar is a three-credit course which travel with one or more instructors. Its specific content will be determined by the intended destination, and will include information on the history, geography, culture, art, and religion of that region. THE SEMINAR IS ONLY OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE SIGNED UP FOR THE TRIP. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities & Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

HVAC - Heating/Air Conditioning

HVAC1000 Alternative Refrigeration Systems Lab I (1 credits)
This course covers all types of refrigeration systems, residential and commercial. The course is designed for the student who wants more hands-on training. The student will troubleshoot, repair, and replace refrigeration systems. To be successful in this course, you should have knowledge in electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls and refrigeration sealed systems. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC1200 Alternative Refrigeration Systems Lab II (2 credits)
This course covers all types of refrigeration systems, residential and commercial. The course is designed for the student who wants more hands-on training. The student will troubleshoot, repair, and replace refrigeration systems. To be successful in this course, you should have knowledge in electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls and refrigeration sealed systems. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2000 Electrical Circuits (2 credits)
This is an introductory course designed to help students understand the relationships of electricity. Electrical units, terms. formulas, and electrical schematics are covered. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2010 IPH Motors and Auxiliary Controls (2 credits)
The course will introduce the student to the different types of single-phase and three phase AC motors used on HVAC/R equipment. Motor starting devices and motor protection devices for single-phase motors will also be covered in depth. From an electrical controls schematic the student will connect and wire motors in start-stop circuits, reversing circuits and three phase circuits. The student will learn to electrically troubleshoot motors and motor control circuits utilizing motor wiring schematics. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program and be in their second or third semester. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2100 Refrigeration Theory (2 credits)
This course introduces the students to the refrigeration system, how it works, and the relationship between pressure and temperatures. We will discuss the reasons for EPA testing, refrigeration terminology, troubleshooting, and the proper handling of refrigerants. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2110 Refrigeration Controls (2 credits)
This course covers controls found in both household and commercial refrigeration systems. The functions and operation of these controls will be discussed along with proper troubleshooting procedures. This course will be offered concurrently with refrigeration theory and electrical circuits. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2120 Testing Refrigeration Systems (2 credits)
This course will cover analyzing, troubleshooting and testing of both the electrical and refrigeration systems. Safety will be stressed throughout this course. This course will be offered concurrently with refrigeration controls. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2205 Coolers/Freezers Electrical Systems & Components (3 credits)
This course will cover both commercial coolers and freezers. The electrical components that are used in commercial coolers and freezers will be studied, analyzed, operated, and tested. A large portion of the class will be designated to the drawing and understanding of wiring schematics for the purpose of troubleshooting electrical failures. Proper safety and troubleshooting techniques will be followed. To be successful in this course, you should have knowledge in electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, and refrigeration controls. (Prerequisite: HVAC 2120)

HVAC2215 Coolers/Freezers Refrigeration Diagnostics & Operations (3 credits)
This course will cover both commercial coolers and freezers. We will discuss the operation of the refrigeration sealed system and analyze how to diagnose system failures and their causes. The student will learn the proper way to recover and charge a commercial refrigeration unit. The students will study and follow EPA regulations regarding the handling of refrigerants. Proper safety and troubleshooting techniques will be followed. To be successful in this course, you should have knowledge in electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, and controls. (Prerequisite: HVAC 2120)

HVAC2220 Commercial Ice Makers (3 credits)
This course covers commercial ice makers used in the industry today. The electrical, mechanical and water systems will be studied, analyzed, connected and operated. The students will study proper troubleshooting and safety procedures. The students will then apply this knowledge when testing the electrical, mechanical and water systems. To be successful in this course, you should have knowledge in electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls and refrigeration sealed systems. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2230 Commercial Alternative Systems (1 credits)
This course will take a look at commercial refrigeration systems found in the Mankato area, along with the companies that service them. The class will take field trips to local businesses and service companies to see how they operate. To be successful in this course, you should have an understanding of the refrigeration sealed system components and how they work. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2240 Central Air Conditioning (2 credits)
This course covers the different central air conditioning systems found in residential and light commercial applications today. The electrical and mechanical systems will be studied and analyzed along with troubleshooting and safety procedures. The students will then apply this knowledge by using proper troubleshooting techniques for testing electrical and mechanical operations in the lab. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program and be in their second or third semester. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2251 Brazing (2 credits)
This course covers brazing equipment and materials. Students will be introduced to the soldering and brazing process, terms, and personal safety. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2301 Indoor Air Quality (1 credits)
This course covers equipment that deals with today's problem with indoor air quality. Students will study, analyze the causes of poor IAQ in homes and the work place. Each student will give an oral report on a topic picked by the instructor. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2310 Hydronic Heat (2 credits)
This course covers systems that utilize fluid for the transfer of heat known as hydronic heating. The electrical and mechanical systems will be studied and analyzed along with troubleshooting system fluid problems, air infiltration and proper operating pressures. The students will identify fluid control components, and demonstrate knowledge of each component's purpose in the lab. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program and be in their second or third semester. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2320 Gas Heat (3 credits)
This course covers the forced air gas heating systems found in residential and light commercial applications. The electrical and mechanical systems will be studied and analyzed along with troubleshooting and safety procedures. The students will then apply this knowledge by using proper troubleshooting techniques for testing electrical and mechanical operations in the lab. To be successful in this class the student should take HVAC 2000 and HVAC 2100 before or concurrent. (Prerequisite: None)

HVAC2325 Commercial Package Heat/Cool Units (2 credits)
This course covers the different commercial packaged heating and cooling systems found in residential, commercial and industrial applications. The electrical, mechanical systems will be studied and analyzed along with troubleshooting and safety procedures. The principle and operation of economizers and their controls will be discussed in class. The student will then take this knowledge and apply it in the lab. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program and be in their second or third semester. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2330 Alternative Heating Systems (2 credits)
This course covers a variety of alternative heating systems, some of the systems included will be oil heating systems, a variety of electrical heating systems, heat pump systems and alternative fuel sources will be discussed. Electrical and mechanical systems will be explored along with safety, troubleshooting and equipment performance. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program, be in their second or third semester and have already taken HVAC 2240, and HVAC 2320 or concurrent. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2340 Sheet Metal Ductwork Fabrication (3 credits)
The course will introduce the student to the layout and fabrication of sheet metal ductwork in both commercial and residential applications. The student will fabricate fittings including reducers, transitions, takeoffs, ogee offsets and radius elbows. Residential duct design and sizing methods will be discussed along with heat loss/heat gain calculations with related computer software applications. The student will be exposed to blue print reading and related specification books. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2400 Advance Central A/C Lab 1 (1 credits)
This course is designed to give the student a more hands on learner guided course work. The student will be required to work on additional lab projects provided by the instructor, industry or the student themselves. Manufacturer instillation guides will be studied and detailed final project will be handed in. The student will practice troubleshooting techniques and get involved in helping fellow students in the lab area to sharpen their communication skills. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program, be in their second or third semester and take HVAC 2240 before or concurrent. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2410 Advanced Central Air Conditioning Lab II (2 credits)
This course is designed to give the student a more hands on learner guided course work. The student will be required to work on additional lab projects provided by the instructor, industry or the student themselves. Manufacturer instillation guides will be studied and detailed final project will be handed in. The student will practice troubleshooting techniques and get involved in helping fellow students in the lab area to sharpen their communication skills. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program, be in their second or third semester and take HVAC 2240 before or concurrent. (Prerequisites: None) ,

HVAC2420 Air Conditioning Internship I (1 credits)
This course covers air conditioning work related experiences. Each student taking this course will be required to fill-out an internship experience worksheet. Students will be repairing equipment in the shop as well as in the customer's home. This is under the guidance of the employer. To be successful in this course, you must have knowledge in electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls, refrigeration sealed systems or concurrently taking HVAC 2240. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2430 Air Conditioning Internship II (2 credits)
This course covers air conditioning work related experiences. Each student taking this course will be required to fill-out an internship experience worksheet. Students will be repairing equipment in the shop as well as in the customer's home. This is under the guidance of the employer. To be successful in this course, you must have knowledge in electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls, refrigeration sealed systems or concurrently taking HVAC 2240. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2440 Advanced Refrigeration Lab I (1 credits)
This course covers all aspects of today's refrigeration systems. This course is designed for students who want more hands-on training. The students will repair, replace and troubleshoot different types of refrigeration systems. EPA regulations will be followed. To be successful in this course, you must be knowledgeable in the following areas: electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls, and sealed systems. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2450 Advanced Refrigeration Lab II (2 credits)
This course covers all aspects of today's refrigeration systems. This course is designed for students who want more hands-on training. The students will repair, replace and troubleshoot different types of refrigeration systems. EPA regulations will be followed. To be successful in this course, you must be knowledgeable in the following areas: electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls, and sealed systems. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2460 Refrigeration Internship I (1 credits)
This course covers household or commercial refrigeration work related experiences. Each student taking this course will be required to fill-out an internship experience worksheet. Students will be repairing equipment in the shop as well as in the customer's home. This is under the guidance of the employer. In order to be successful in this course, you must be knowledgeable in the areas of electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls, and sealed systems. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2470 Refrigeration Internship II (2 credits)
This course covers household or commercial refrigeration work related experiences. Each student taking this course will be required to fill-out an internship experience worksheet. Students will be repairing equipment in the shop as well as in the customer's home. This is under the guidance of the employer. In order to be successful in this course, you must be knowledgeable in the areas of electrical circuits, refrigeration theory, controls and sealed systems. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2500 Advance Heating Lab I (1 credits)
This course is designed to give the student a more hands on learner guided course work. The student will be required to work on additional lab projects provided by the instructor, industry or the student themselves. Manufacturer instillation guides will be studied and detailed final project will be handed in. The student will practice troubleshooting techniques and get involved in helping fellow students in the lab area to sharpen their communication skills. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program, be in their second or third semester and taken HVAC 2320. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2510 Advanced Heating Lab II (2 credits)
This course is designed to give the student a more hands on learner guided course work. The student will be required to work on additional lab projects provided by the instructor, industry or the student themselves. Manufacturer instillation guides will be studied and a detailed final project will be handed in. The student will practice troubleshooting techniques and get involved in helping fellow students in the lab area to sharpen their communication skills. To be successful in this class the student will need to be enrolled in the HVAC program, be in their second or third semester and have already taken HVAC 2320. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2520 Heating Internship I (1 credits)
This course covers heating work related experiences. Each student taking this course will be required to fill-out an internship experience worksheet. Students will be repairing equipment in the shop as well as in the customer's home. This is under the guidance of the employer. In order to be successful in this course, you must be knowledgeable in electrical circuits, controls or concurrently taking HVAC 2320. (Prerequisites: None)

HVAC2530 Heating Internship II (2 credits)
This course covers heating work related experiences. Each student taking this course will be required to fill-out an internship experience worksheet. Students will be repairing equipment in the shop as well as in the customer's home. This is under the guidance of the employer. In order to be successful in this course, you must be knowledgeable in electrical circuits, controls or concurrently taking HVAC 2320. (Prerequisites: None)

ICP - Intensive Care Paramedic

ICP1000 Introduction to Paramedicine (3 credits)
The Paramedic has a variety of duties. This course demonstrates the difference between the various levels of the Emergency Medical Technician and the responsibilities that accompany each level of training. It also includes introductory topics that the individual must understand in order to function as a paramedic. Such topics include medical/legal issues, communications, stress, system structure, lifting mechanics, medical terminology, infection control, etc. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP1005 Applied Anatomy and Physiology for EMS (3 credits)
This course is designed as an introduction to body structure and function. An emphasis will be placed on body systems specifically related to paramedicine and how that knowledge can be applied to EMS care. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP1010 EMS Skills (5 credits)
EMS SKILLS focuses on the Basic Life Support skills that the EMT-P must master along with this introduction to advanced skills. These include: Patient assessment, airway control with adjuncts, IV therapy, suctioning, communication skills, AED's, intubation, medication administration, cardiac skills, and other invasive techniques. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP1020 Pharmacology for EMS (3 credits)
The intent of this course is to introduce the student to basic pharmacological concepts, principles of drug safety and basic drug categories. Legal aspects of drug administration, drug standards, and use of reference material will be included. Specialized medications utilized in ALS transports will also be discussed. This course will have a primary focus on specific drugs used by paramedics. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP1040 Cardiac Care in EMS (4 credits)
The course will prepare the EMT-P to assess and manage those cardiac emergencies that result from coronary atherosclerosis, along with a number of conditions involving pathology of peripheral/central circulation. The interpretation of cardiac dysrhythmias receives much emphasis in this course. ACLS Provider certification may be included. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP1050 Trauma Care (3 credits)
This course deals with the many aspects of trauma, including kinematics, evaluation, management, packaging, and transport. Advanced ITLS certification may be obtained. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP1060 Pathophysiology in EMS (5 credits)
This course discusses a variety of topics and medical conditions that occur in the various body systems. Emphasis is placed on field management of medical emergencies. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP2010 EMS Advanced Skills (5 credits)
This course is designed to orient the student to the rescue environment. Emphasis is placed on the role and responsibilities of the paramedic during a rescue response, including essential skills needed to keep the paramedic and the patient safe. Topics include Mass Casualty Incidents (includes ICS & START disaster response), hazardous materials, basic rescue, water and ice rescue awareness, high level-low angle rescue, emergency driving, special rescue situations and auto extrication for the paramedic. Also included is an introduction to advanced intensive care paramedic skills. Additional clinical rotations will also be completed. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP2030 Critical Care I (3 credits)
This courses orients students to the emergency room, intensive care unit, cardiac intensive care, telemetry unit and critical care departments. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP2040 Critical Care II (3 credits)
Clinical areas may include: Psychiatric Unit, Obstetrics, Pediatrics and Geriatrics. (Prerequisite: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP2050 Field Internship I (3 credits)
This internship involves experiences with an advanced life support system provided by a fire service, municipal, hospital or other. (Prerequisites: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP2060 Field Internship II (3 credits)
This internship involves experiences with and advanced life support system provided by a private service. (Prerequisites: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP2070 Special Populations (5 credits)
This course covers medical considerations in areas such as geriatrics, obstetrics, gynecology, neonates, pediatrics, behavior disorders, and patients with special needs. PALS certification may be obtained. (Prerequisites: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP2080 Paramedic Refresher (3 credits)
This course is a comprehensive review of the technical courses and designed to prepare the candidate to challenge the National Registry Exam. It also meets the requirements for the 48-hour refresher. (Prerequisites: Admission into the Paramedic Program. All classes must be taken in sequence.)

ICP2090 Hazardous Materials (1 credits)
This course is designed to meet the training standards designed in NFPA473 "Standards for Competencies of EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials Incidents". The class combines didactic training with audio-visual materials that will provide a review of pertinent "awareness" level information. To insure a safe EMS response to a hazardous materials situation at the Operations Level, additional information and practical laboratory time will be provided as necessary. (Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor)

MA - Medical Assistant

MA1000 Medical Assisting Orientation (3 credits)
This course covers an overview of the healthcare team and the role of the medical assistant in an ambulatory care setting. Emphasis is on professionalism, communication, attitude, behaviors, and duties in the medical environment. (Pre/Corequisites: None)

MA1020 Medical Office Procedures (3 credits)
This course will review administrative duties that are performed by a medical assistant. Emphasis will be on clerical functions, bookkeeping procedures, insurance claims, professional communications, medical coding, legal concepts, medical office operational functions including written and electronic. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into one of the following programs: Medical Assisting, Health Unit Coordinator, or Administrative Office Specialist - Medical)

MA2000 Pharmacology for Medical Assistants (3 credits)
In this course students will learn topics essential for the Medical Assistant to thoroughly understand drug sources, herbs and supplements, legislation relating to drugs, drug references and drug classifications. Students will also gain knowledge in basic principles for administering different types of medications and the universal precautions and standards related to the role of a Medical Assistant. (Prerequisites: HC 1001, 1914, MA 2010)

MA2010 Laboratory Skills for Medical Assistants (3 credits)
This course is designed to teach laboratory fundamentals of medical assisting in a clinical office setting. Students will learn aspects of standard precautions, laboratory safety, venipuncture, collection of patient specimens, perform CLIA waived laboratory testing along with identification of infectious agents. (Prerequisites: None)

MA2015 Clinical Skills I (3 credits)
This course introduces skills utilized in a clinical setting for Medical Assistants. Using primary care as the framework students will apply their critical thinking skills and skills for assisting with health exams, obtaining vital signs, assisting with procedures and treatments within the ambulatory care setting. Infection control techniques will be studied and sued in the clinical setting. The student will discuss the MA role in emergency preparedness and use first aid procedures. (Corequisites: MA 2010)

MA2020 Clinical Skills II (3 credits)
This course builds on the skills obtained in Clinical Skills I for Medical Assistants. Using medical specialties as the framework students will utilize their critical thinking skills to learn specific health testing, procedures and treatments in medical specialty departments within the ambulatory care setting (Prerequisites: MA 2015)

MA2030 Radiography Skills for Medical Assistants (3 credits)
This course is a comprehensive look at the skills and process needed to obtain a limited scope of practice certificate in radiography. Students will learn information regarding, radiation protection, image production and evaluation, equipment operation and quality control, patient care and education, as well as radiographic procedures for each anatomical region. (Prerequisites: HC 1000, 1914)

MA2040 Medical Assistant Internship (5 credits)
Students will engage in a non paid medical assisting internship within an ambulatory health care setting. In actual work situations, students will perform administrative and clinical competencies. Administrative competencies may include and are not limited to, clerical functions, performing bookkeeping tasks and scheduling appointments. Clinical competencies may include and are not limited to, specimen collection, diagnostic testing and patient care. Students will participate in mandatory campus meetings where the student will learn job search and interview techniques along with participation in test preparation for their National Certification Exam. (Prerequisites: MA 2000, 2020)

MASS - Mass Communication

MASS100 Introduction to Newspaper Writing (3 credits)
Introduction to Newspaper Writing focuses on the principles of gathering information and writing news and feature stories for the mass media, with an emphasis on newspaper writing. Students enrolled in this course will be staff members of SCC's student run college newspaper - The Spotlight. Students will attend lectures, participate in regular meetings of the newspaper staff, and meet deadlines for writing articles for the school newspaper. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC: None, will be used as an elective)

MASS110 Introduction to Mass Communication (4 credits)
This course explores the structures, functions, responsibilities, and effects of the media in contemporary society. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 2, 9: Critical Thinking, Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

MATH - Math

MATH0075 Introductory Algebra (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with a review of basic fundamentals of algebra and mathematics. Topics include: algebraic expressions, functions, polynomials, exponents, solving and graphing linear equalities and inequalities, interpreting data in graphical form, factoring polynomials, simplifying rational expressions, and solving and simplifying radical and rational equations. Students needing foundational level improvement are highly encouraged to gain this first and/or concurrently with this course. Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards in Mathematics indicated in parenthesis after each competency on the Common Course Outline. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 220 to 249 or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 30 to 55 or MCA Math score of 1145 or below.)

MATH0085 Intermediate Algebra (4 credits)
This course is function - based. It starts with a general overview of equations and inequalities. It then proceeds to cover linear functions, polynomial and rational functions, quadratic functions, equations involving radicals, and absolute values. Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards in Mathematics are indicated in parentheses after each competency on the Common Course Outline. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplaccer Arithmetic score of 250 to 300 and Next-Generation QAS score of 200 to 236 or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher and Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 0 to 75 or completion of MATH 0075 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or MCA Math score of 1146 to 1149.)

MATH0095 Elementary and Intermediate Algebra (6 credits)
This course is function - based. It starts with a brief overview of the number system and continues through equations and inequalities. It then proceeds to cover linear functions, polynomial and rational functions, quadratic functions, equations involving radicals, and absolute values. This course includes the latter part of Math 0075 and all of Math 0085. Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards in Mathematics are indicated in parentheses after each competency on the Common Course Outline. (Prerequisite: Next-Generation Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 235 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 36.)

MATH100 Elementary Algebra (CONSORTIUM) (3 credits)
Consortium Course Iowa Lakes Community College

MATH1050 Mathematics for Technical Careers (3 credits)
Designed primarily for those entering the technical fields, this course develops a number of essential mathematical techniques in algebra, trigonometry and geometry. Among other things, the participant will learn how to simplify and factor algebraic expressions, solve linear and quadratic equations and systems of linear equations, evaluate and use the six trigonometric functions in computing triangle results, and apply geometric concepts to the measurement of both two- and three-dimensional objects. This course is not a prerequisite for college level math courses. (Prerequisite: Next-Generation Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 250 to 300 and a Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 200 to 236 or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher or completion of MATH 0075 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.)

MATH115 Concepts in Math (4 credits)
Concepts in Mathematics is a general education survey course designed to spotlight the field as an important component of our cultural heritage. It introduces a broad range of topics from classical as well as modern mathematics. The emphasis is on problem solving and developing the logical skills to successfully defend solutions, while at the same time showing how mathematics is a creative human endeavor influencing how we perceive the world. Among the major topics considered are logic, set theory, axiomatic systems, number theory, number systems, analytic geometry, algebra, combinatorics, and elementary probability. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 237 to 300; or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher AND Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher; or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher.) (MNTC 4: Math/Logical Reasoning)

MATH120 College Algebra (4 credits)
This course is mainly concerned with functions, most of which are algebraic. It begins with general treatment of equations and inequalities and then proceeds to cover linear functions, quadratic functions, polynomial and rational functions, piecewise functions, equations involving radicals and absolute values, logarithms and exponentials, systems of equations and inequalities, permutations and combinations. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher AND Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher AND a Classic Accuplacer College Math score of 50 or higher, or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 22 or higher or MCA Math score of 1158 or higher.) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH121 College Algebra (CONSORTIUM) (4 credits)
Consortium Course Iowa Lakes Community College

MATH125 Trigonometry (3 credits)
A study of the six trigonometric functions, their inverses and their applications forms the heart of this course. First, the two common methods of angle measure are derived along with the related notions of length of arc and area of a sector. Then the trigonometric functions are defined in terms of the unit circle and their properties such as domain, range, period and amplitude are explored, along with their associated graphs. This leads to a study of identities and conditional equations. Triangle trigonometry and real-world applications follow, with an investigation of associated themes such as vectors, exponential and logarithmic functions.(Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer College Math score of 63 or higher or Completion of MATH 120 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 22 or higher.) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH130 Pre-Calculus (4 credits)
This is an accelerated course covering many topics from both College Algebra and Trigonometry. These include functions, graphs of functions, analytic geometry of the conic sections, systems of equations and inequalities, elementary matrix operations and determinants, properties and applications of exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, complex numbers, vectors, polar coordinates and elementary combinatorics. Should not be taken for credit in addition to either MATH 120 or MATH 125. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer College Math score of 86 or higher, or ACT Math score of 23 or higher.) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH131 Calculus I (4 credits)
This course introduces the key concepts of the derivative and the integral. Beginning with the definition of limit, the notion of continuity is developed which is perhaps the most important thread running throughout the calculus. This leads naturally to the process of differentiation and then integration, concluding with the all important Fundamental Theorem of the Calculus. Along the way, applications to classical and modern science, economics, the social sciences and other fields are explored. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 276 or higher or Classic Accuplacer College Math score of 103 or higher or ACT Math score of 24 or higher or completion of either MATH 125 or MATH 130 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH132 Calculus II (4 credits)
In this continuation of Calculus I, you will begin by investigating more applications of the definite integral, along with useful techniques for evaluating them. This leads in a natural way to a brief introduction to differential equations, and the evaluation of improper integrals and indeterminate forms. Next, the calculus of the transcendental functions is explored in some detail. Then the study of sequences and series is taken up, including power series and Taylor series. Important geometrical concepts such as polar coordinates, parametric equations and vectors in the plane and in space are also covered. (Prerequisites: MATH 131, with a grade of C or better) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH154 Elementary Statistics (4 credits)
This course introduces the essential mathematical elements of statistics, applying them to a broad range of areas including business, manufacturing, economics, and the physical, biological and social sciences. Topics include descriptive measures of data, measures of central tendency, variability, standard probability distributions, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, and estimation. To put the treatment on a strong foundation, concepts of probability are developed throughout, and shown to form the unifying theme behind modern statistics. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 250 to 300; or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher AND Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher; or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher.)

MATH231 Ordinary Differential Equations (4 credits)
This is a traditional introductory course in ordinary differential equations for students pursuing careers in engineering, mathematics and the sciences; the focus is primarily on lower order equations. Topics include the solution of linear equations with constant coefficients, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous equations, assorted methods such as undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters and Laplace transforms. Also studied are existence and uniqueness theorems, numerical approximations, operator methods and various applications to physical phenomena. (Prerequisite: MATH 132 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH233 Multivariable Calculus (4 credits)
Multivariable Calculus extends the notions of Calculus I and Calculus II to functions of more than one variable. Topics include such things as curves and surfaces in Euclidean n-space, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, tangent planes and differentials, double- and triple-integrals, the rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems, line integrals, surface integrals, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem and the divergence theorem. (Prerequisite: MATH 132 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH240 Elementary Linear Algebra (4 credits)
This is a first course in linear algebra for students intending to go into engineering, mathematics, the sciences, economics, statistics and other technical fields. Among the topics covered are matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear tranformations and characteristic value problems. Apart from the useful and practical topics considered, the course also serves as an introduction to the notion of mathematical proof. (Prerequisite: MATH 132 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MDLT - Medical Laboratory Technician

MDLT1810 Laboratory Techniques and Orientation (3 credits)
This course is an orientation course that familiarizes the student with a career in the medical laboratory field. It covers basic skills in clinical laboratory techniques and provides the student with practice. Topics include: MLT/Phlebotomy program policies; certification; working with various pieces of equipment; safety; infection control; quality control; specimen collection/handling/processing; good laboratory technique and maintaining efficiency and accuracy. The practice of phlebotomy is heavily emphasized in this course. Students will continue to enhance their phlebotomy skills in other technical courses, where blood samples are needed, and also during the clinical internship. (Prerequisites: None)

MDLT1815 Hematology I (3 credits)
This course covers basic hematology procedures involving such tests as red cell counts, white cell counts, platelet counts, hemoglobin determination, hematocrits, sedimentation rates and reticulocyte counts. Also covered are the abnormalities of these elements which cause diseases, and bone marrow procedures. (Prerequisite: MDLT 1810 may also be taken concurrently or with Program Director permission)

MDLT1820 Coagulation (2 credits)
This course covers the basic principles of the hemostasis, the clotting system of the body. The course of study includes the coagulation factors and their cascade sequence, vascular and platelet components, fibrinolysis, thrombosis, anticoagulant therapy and quality control. Abnormalities of the coagulation system will also be covered. (Prerequisite: MDLT 1810, & MDLT 1815 with a grade of C or higher.)

MDLT1825 Urinalysis/Body Fluids (3 credits)
The lecture component of this course will cover basic theory in urine formation, renal physiology, and metabolic disorders that produce abnormalities in the urine. Complete urinalysis examinations will be performed in the student laboratory. Basic analysis of other body fluids will be discussed with an emphasis on laboratory methods currently in use. (Prerequisite: MDLT 1810 & MDLT 2818 with a grade of C or higher.)

MDLT1830 Hematology II (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of MDLT 1815 Hematology I. It includes the study of anemias and leukemias, and the correlation of these disease processes. Instruction includes lecture and laboratory case studies, and the use of automated hematology analyzers. (Prerequisite: MDLT 1810 & MDLT 1815 with a grade of C or higher.)

MDLT1835 Immunology (2 credits)
This course is a basic overview of the immune system. Laboratory instruction is designed to instruct the students in basic immunology testing methods for the correlation of immunologic disorders. (Preqrequisite: MDLT 1810 & MDLT 2818 with a grade of C or higher.)

MDLT2806 Immunohematology I (2 credits)
This course covers the introduction to both the theory and practical aspects of Immunohematology. Areas of study include red blood cell antigens and antibodies, blood typing, antibody screening, antibody identification, compatibility testing, and quality control in the blood bank.. The course is designed to prepare the student for practical training in Immunohematology. (Prerequisite: MDLT 1810, & MDLT 1815 with a grade of C or higher.)

MDLT2807 Immunohematology II (2 credits)
This course is a continuation of MDLT 2806 Immunohematology I. The student will receive further basic training and practical instruction on both the theory and practical aspects of immunohematology. Areas of study include pretransfusion testing, transfusion therapy, adverse transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the newborn, hemolytic anemias, human leukocyte antigens, donor selection, and component processing. The course is designed to prepare the student for practical training in immunohematology. (Prerequisite: MDLT 1810 and MDLT 2806 with a grade of C.)

MDLT2811 Microbiology I (3 credits)
This course covers the isolation and identification of clinically significant microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on specimen sources, growth characteristics, techniques for identification, and quality control. (Prerequisite: MDLT 1810 may be taken concurrently or with Program Director permission)

MDLT2817 Chemistry I (4 credits)
This course covers the analysis of chemical constituents of plasma, serum, urine and other body fluids. Emphasis is placed on physiology, methodology and clinical significance of carbohydrate metabolism, non-protein nitrogen, renal and liver function, tumor markers and porphyrins. Accuracy in performance, quality control and laboratory safety is stressed. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1810 may also be taken concurrently or with Program Director permission)

MDLT2818 Chemistry II (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of MDLT 2817 Chemistry I and includes the theory and clinical correlations of acid/base balance, liver function, cardiac function, gastrointestinal function, pancreatic function, endocrinology, therapeutic drug monitoring, toxicology, tumor markers, nutritional assessment, biochemical assessment during pregnancy, and point-of-care testing, The MLT student learns the theory and technique of each procedure, quality control, and normal values of chemical constituents analyzed. Concepts that are basic to the operation of automated laboratory instruments will be discussed. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1810 & MDLT 2817 with a grade of C or higher.)

MDLT2821 Microbiology II (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of Microbiology I. The students will receive further basic practical instruction in the isolation and identification of clinically significant microorganisms. A short introduction to parasitology/mycology/virology/Mycobacterium species will also be included. (Prerequisite: MDLT 1810 and MDLT 2811 with a grade of C or higher.)

MDLT2825 Clinical Practice & Orientation (1 credits)
This course covers an explanation of the hospital and clinic structure and the student's role in the clinical practice setting. The student will learn the basic knowledge necessary for effective understanding of his/her expectations and evaluations as an MLT student in the clinical practice training and his/her role as an employee after graduation. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1825, MDLT 1835, and MDLT 2807)

MDLT2826 Clinical: Hematology & Coagulation (2 credits)
During the clinical hematology and coagulation experience, the student is assigned to an affiliated hospital/clinic laboratory for the purpose of acquiring practical experience in a laboratory setting while under direct supervision. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase of their training with practical hands-on experience for preparation of employment in a clinical laboratory. Students practice basic laboratory procedures/techniques, and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1825, 1835, 2807)

MDLT2827 Clinical: Chemistry & Immunology (2 credits)
During the clinical chemistry and immunology experience, the student is assigned to an affiliated hospital/clinic laboratory for the purpose of acquiring practical experience in a laboratory setting while under direct supervision. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase of their training with practical hands-on experience for preparation of employment in a clinical laboratory. Students practice basic laboratory procedures/techniques, and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1825, 1835, 2807)

MDLT2828 Clinical: Immunohematology (2 credits)
During the clinical immunohematology experience, the student is assigned to an affiliated hospital/clinic laboratory for the purpose of acquiring practical experience in a laboratory setting while under direct supervision. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase of their training with practical hands-on experience for preparation of employment in a clinical laboratory. Students practice basic laboratory procedures/techniques, and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1825, 1835, 2807)

MDLT2829 Clinical: Microbiology (3 credits)
During the clinical microbiology experience, the student is assigned to an affiliated hospital/clinic laboratory for the purpose of acquiring practical experience in a laboratory setting while under direct supervision. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase of their training with practical hands-on experience for preparation of employment in a clinical laboratory. Students practice basic laboratory procedures/techniques, and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1825, 1835, 2807.)

MDLT2830 Clinical: Urinalysis/Body Fluids (1 credits)
During the clinical urinalysis/body fluids experience, the student is assigned to an affiliated hospital/clinic laboratory for the purpose of acquiring practical experience in a laboratory setting while under direct supervision. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase of their training with practical hands-on experience for preparation of employment in a clinical laboratory. Students practice basic laboratory procedures/techniques, and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1825, 1835, 2807)

MDLT2831 Clinical: Phlebotomy (1 credits)
During the clinical phlebotomy experience, the student is assigned to an affiliated hospital/clinic laboratory for the purpose of acquiring practical experience in a laboratory setting while under direct supervision. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase of their training with practical hands-on experience for preparation of employment in a clinical laboratory. Students practice basic laboratory procedures/techniques, and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1825, 1835, 2807)

MDLT2900 Clinical: Hematology (3 credits)
In the clinical laboratory sequence, the student continues their education in a hospital or clinic laboratory under the supervision of a certified Medical Technologist. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase in an employment-like setting. Students rotate through all areas of the medical laboratory gaining experience and practice in basic medical laboratory techniques, procedures and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: completion of all MDLT technical courses and general education courses OR Program Director permission) Clinical sequence courses consist of the following: Hematology, Chemistry, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, Immunohematology, Immunology, Microbiology, and Coagulation.

MDLT2901 Clinical: Chemistry (3 credits)
In the clinical laboratory sequence, the student continues their education in a hospital or clinic laboratory under the supervision of a certified Medical Technologist. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase in an employment-like setting. Students rotate through all areas of the medical laboratory gaining experience and practice in basic medical laboratory techniques, procedures and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: completion of all MDLT technical courses and general education courses OR Program Director permission) Clinical sequence courses consist of the following: Hematology, Chemistry, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, Immunohematology, Immunology, Microbiology, and Coagulation.

MDLT2902 Clinical: Urinalysis and Body Fluids (2 credits)
In the clinical laboratory sequence, the student continues their education in a hospital or clinic laboratory under the supervision of a certified Medical Technologist. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase in an employment-like setting. Students rotate through all areas of the medical laboratory gaining experience and practice in basic medical laboratory techniques, procedures and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: completion of all MDLT technical courses and general education courses OR Program Director permission) Clinical sequence courses consist of the following: Hematology, Chemistry, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, Immunohematology, Immunology, Microbiology, and Coagulation.

MDLT2903 Clinical: Immunohematology (4 credits)
In the clinical laboratory sequence, the student continues their education in a hospital or clinic laboratory under the supervision of a certified Medical Technologist. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase in an employment-like setting. Students rotate through all areas of the medical laboratory gaining experience and practice in basic medical laboratory techniques, procedures and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: completion of all MDLT technical courses and general education courses OR Program Director permission) Clinical sequence courses consist of the following: Hematology, Chemistry, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, Immunohematology, Immunology, Microbiology, and Coagulation.

MDLT2904 Clinical: Immunology (1 credits)
In the clinical laboratory sequence, the student continues their education in a hospital or clinic laboratory under the supervision of a certified Medical Technologist. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase in an employment-like setting. Students rotate through all areas of the medical laboratory gaining experience and practice in basic medical laboratory techniques, procedures and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: completion of all MDLT technical courses and general education courses OR Program Director permission) Clinical sequence courses consist of the following: Hematology, Chemistry, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, Immunohematology, Immunology, Microbiology, and Coagulation.

MDLT2905 Clinical: Microbiology (3 credits)
In the clinical laboratory sequence, the student continues their education in a hospital or clinic laboratory under the supervision of a certified Medical Technologist. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase in an employment-like setting. Students rotate through all areas of the medical laboratory gaining experience and practice in basic medical laboratory techniques, procedures and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: completion of all MDLT technical courses and general education courses OR Program Director permission) Clinical sequence courses consist of the following: Hematology, Chemistry, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, Immunohematology, Immunology, Microbiology, and Coagulation.

MDLT2906 Clinical: Coagulation (1 credits)
In the clinical laboratory sequence, the student continues their education in a hospital or clinic laboratory under the supervision of a certified Medical Technologist. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase in an employment-like setting. Students rotate through all areas of the medical laboratory gaining experience and practice in basic medical laboratory techniques, procedures and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: completion of all MDLT technical courses and general education courses OR Program Director permission) Clinical sequence courses consist of the following: Hematology, Chemistry, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, Immunohematology, Immunology, Microbiology, and Coagulation.

MDLT2907 Clinical: Urinalysis and Body Fluids (1 credits)
In the clinical laboratory sequence, the student continues their education in a hospital or clinic laboratory under the supervision of a certified Medical Technologist. The experience allows the student to apply knowledge learned in the didactic phase in an employment-like setting. Students rotate through all areas of the medical laboratory gaining experience and practice in basic medical laboratory techniques, procedures and phlebotomy. (Prerequisites: completion of all MDLT technical courses and general education courses OR Program Director permission) Clinical sequence courses consist of the following: Hematology, Chemistry, Urinalysis and Body Fluids, Immunohematology, Immunology, Microbiology, and Coagulation.

MDLT2990 Special Topics (1 - 6 credits)
This course is designed for MLT/Phlebotomy students who after a lapse in their MLT/Phlebotomy training due to circumstances beyond their control, require a review in basic medical laboratory techniques, require phlebotomy technique re-training, need additional time to complete assigned projects for their program major, etc. Each student will be advised by the Program Director. Enrollment credits are variable and will be determined by individual student circumstances. (Prerequisite: Program Director permission)

MEAG - Agri-Business

MEAG1206 Precision Agriculture Equipment (3 credits)
This class is an introduction to many of the equipment systems involved in precision agriculture. The areas covered will include equipment used for steering and guidance, fertilizer and chemical application, and harvest data collection. Basic understanding of DC electrical systems and basic hydraulics will be reviewed along with computer skills needed for upgrading system components. Instruction will include offsite tours and demonstrations to assure current information is available. (Prerequisites: None)

MEAG1207 Precision Agriculture Software (3 credits)
This course will provide hands-on training in Spatial Management System (SMS) precision agriculture software including yield monitoring, planting, spraying, and more. It will cover an introduction of basic SMS systems used in agriculture, software troubleshooting, data collection and analysis. Students will also be exposed to complex mapping systems including field bordering, zone mapping, and yield mapping. (Prerequisite: PLSC 1205)

MEAG1500 Facility Maintenance (3 credits)
This course covers...farm and residential electrical wiring. Practical 120/240 volt circuit wiring, electrical safety, device selection, installation methods, grounding, bonding and service entrance panels included. Students will be wiring circuits according to code. Plumbing processes of Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) and copper will be included. Another component of this class includes; OxyAcetylene welding, gas torch and/or plasma cutting and several forms of Arc welding. Students will spend time in the welding lab completing the required welds. Electrical and welding safety will be stressed. (Prerequisites: None).

MEAG1510 Facility Operations Maintenance (3 credits)
This course includes a detailed look at maintenance and servicing of production facilities: electrical, plumbing, and mechanical equipment. Trouble shooting of ventilation, plumbing, feed lines, curtain controls, and electric motors will be discussed. Included also in the course are practical 120/240 volt wiring, electrical safety, device selection, and installation methods that apply to workers in livestock and production facilities. This course will also cover maintenance of heaters, waste handling, and facility equipment used in livestock facilities. (Prerequisites: None)

MEAG1610 Ag Equipment Maintenance (3 credits)
This course covers basic harvesting, tillage and planting equipment. The student will learn all component parts and proper adjustments of equipment. Machine adjustment may be accomplished on demonstration units, operator manual examples, actual equipment or field trips. In the machinery operation, set-up, and reconditioning portion, the student identifies preventative maintenance, set-up and reconditioning procedures, follows the set-up and operators manual, uses a check sheet and torque chart. (Prerequisites: None)

MEAG1700 Agricultural Industry Machinery Maintenance (3 credits)
This course covers theory and service competencies necessary to maintain small engines, gasoline-powered vehicles, and diesel-powered vehicles. Students will gain an awareness of equipment maintenance programs. The course includes field trips and instruction in maintaining equipment found in feed mills, fertilizer plants, and grain elevators. The course will also cover tillage, crop protection and planting equipment. Students will learn all component parts and proper adjustment of the particular units. Machine adjustment maybe accomplished on demonstration units, operator manual examples or on actual industry equipment. The course will also cover chemical, fertilizer, pesticide handling considerations. (Prerequisites: None)

MEAG2200 Planning Farmstead Environments (3 credits)
This course covers farm building materials and methods of construction. Farmstead planning concepts are examined and applied to the student's home farm situation. Design and drawing of various types of farm buildings are included. The storing, drying, processing and handling of grain and feed are included. Ventilation of livestock buildings and animal waste management is emphasized. Students will gain experience in sizing and selecting equipment for agricultural materials handling applications. (Prerequisite: None)

MEAG2300 Ag Equipment Maintenance I (4 credits)
This course covers a theory and service competencies necessary to maintain small engine, gasoline and diesel powered vehicles on the farm. Students will gain an awareness of equipment maintenance programs. The electrical portion covers farm and residential electrical wiring. Practical 120/240 circuit wiring, electrical safety, device selection, installation methods, grounding, bonding and service entrance panels are included. The final component includes both electric arc, gas welding and a short section on the wire welding system. Students will spend time in the welding lab completing welds. NOTE: Students will merge with the MEAG 1500 Facility Maintenance plus combine at the end of the Agribusiness Spring semester schedule (mid-April) to enhance the ability to successfully teach the ag equipment specifics in an agricultural education program. (Prerequisite: None)

MECA - Mechatronics

MECA1000 Introduction to Mechatronics (3 credits)
Introduction to Engineering Design is a foundation course in the Mechatronics program. By exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes, students will learn how technicians use technology in manufacturing and production settings. Theoretical and hands-on problem-solving activities are emphasized. This course will also engage the student to the proper and safe use of hand and shop tools. Hands-on labs and software are used as learning tools for students to design and produce projects related to industry. Students should take this as the first course in the sequence of Mechatronics courses. This course will also provide an overview of decision-making techniques and the application and benefits of decision-making using the Value Method process. (Prerequisites: None)

MECA1110 Solidworks (2 credits)
This course is designed to teach the student the use of Solidworks mechanical design automation software. The student will make drawings of parts and assemblies related to the field of Mechatronics. (Prerequisites: None)

MECA1122 Electricity - Devices and Circuits I (3 credits)
This course provides an exploration of the basics in electricity and electronics. Topics include an overview of direct current, circuit laws, components, and use of test equipment. Students learn the basic technique of troubleshooting electric circuits, including measurement techniques, analysis of faults, and repair procedures. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 56 or higher on the Arithmetic portion of the Accuplacer test or Instructor approval)

MECA1131 Computer Applications (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide students programs enrolled in technical programs an understanding of how the computer can be used as a tool to address a variety of applications utilizing input and output sources common to industry. Activities will also include, but are not limited to browser usage, word processing, spreadsheets, graphing capabilities, engineering scheduling applications and modeling and simulation software. (Prerequisites: None)

MECA1140 Introduction to Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (1 credits)
Students receive step-by-step instruction in Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) fundamentals with detailed explanations of each topic, GD&T symbols and definitions. Practice exercises are used throughout the instruction to provide additional discussion and learning opportunities. Students also learn to apply GD&T to industry-standard drawings. (Prerequisite: None)

MECA1150 Boiler Operation Principles (1 credits)
This course is designed for anyone who needs to understand fundamental boiler operation in order to improve efficiencies and safety at their industrial plants or large building facilities. This course can also help students prepare for Boiler Operating Licensing exams. Individuals involved with residential hot water systems will also find this course extremely valuable. (Prerequisite: None)

MECA1210 Digital Electronics (3 credits)
This course explores the general fundamentals of digital electronic circuits. To learn the theory and operation of digital electronics, students will get hands-on experience with basic logic gates; sequential logic circuits, such as flip-flops, counters, and shift registers; and combinational logic circuits that include encoders, decoders, multiplexers, and arithmetic devices. A variety of measurement equipment will be used to test and troubleshoot solid state and digital circuits created on breadboards during lab sessions. Teamwork, critical thinking skills, and practical applications of circuits will be emphasized. (Prerequisite: None)

MECA1220 Mechanical Systems (3 credits)
This course includes an introduction to mechanical drive systems, power transmission systems, chain drives, v-belt and, multiple shaft drives, linear motion assemblies, and auxiliary control functions. The student will study the application of spur, helical, bevel and worm gears as well as the use of keys, pins, and splines to attach gears to shafts. Machine elements such as; displacement, velocity, acceleration, springs, power screws, brakes and clutches will also be topics covered. Computer simulation and 3D software will be used throughout the course. Troubleshooting of mechanical systems will be emphasized. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisites: PHYS 101 or comparable with approval of Instructor)

MECA1222 Electricity - Devices and Circuits II (3 credits)
This course provides an exploration of the basics in electricity and electronics. Topics include an overview of alternating current, circuit laws, components, and use of test equipment. Students learn the basic technique of troubleshooting electric circuits, including measurement techniques, analysis of faults, and repair procedures. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included. (Prerequisites: MECA 1122))

MECA1223 Mechanical Systems 1 (3 credits)
This course includes an introduction to mechanical drawings, Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing and simple machines. The student will study the application and kinematic motion of simple machines elements. In addition, lab work will emphasize the safe use of hand tools, portable power tools and mechanical measuring tools and instruments. Troubleshooting of mechanical systems will be emphasized. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisite: None)

MECA1230 Automated Process Measurement (1 credits)
This course covers applications of virtual measurement tools for industrial applications. Topics include basic virtual tool programming concepts, experiment setup and result presentation. (Prerequisites: MECA 1130 or instructor permission required)

MECA1240 Quality Concepts in Manufacturing (2 credits)
This is an introductory course to quality for students who are pursuing careers in technical fields. Topics include fundamentals of statistics, control chart variables and attributes, reliability and quality costs. This course also introduces the student to the requirements of ISO 9000, Lean concepts, Value Stream Mapping and 5S philosophies, principles and techniques of managing quality. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 56 or higher on the Arithmetic portion of the Accuplacer test or Instructor approval)

MECA1250 Mechatronics Systems Operations I (3 credits)
This course will provide the student with the principles of programmable logic controllers (PLC) hardware and fundamental sequence control systems. The student will gain essential knowledge necessary to create and edit basic PLC programs that will include timers, counters and special function blocks. As well as gaining an understanding of interfacing discrete input-output (I/O). The student will also perform fundamental PLC troubleshooting procedures. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MECA 1122)

MECA1260 Microprocessor Systems (3 credits)
This course will provide students with the knowledge required to understand, program, and apply microcontrollers using 8 and 16 bit microcontrollers. The student will learn the basics of interfacing embedded system hardware and software by programming and interfacing simple peripheral circuitry using microprocessor development boards, programming environments, and peripheral application modules. Topics will include introduction to programming in assembler and C programming, applying C coding standards, controlling inputs and outputs, human interface devices such as displays and key pads, and motion control. Technical writing skills, embedded coding standards, and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MECA 1122, 1125, 1130)

MECA1270 Modeling and Simulation (3 credits)
This course will provide students with the understanding of the interaction of the parts of a system, and of the system as a whole. A unified approach to modeling of dynamic systems using computer simulation and model validation is used. Emphasis will be on modeling and simulation of mechanical parts and assemblies, electronic circuits, fluid power systems and PLC controlled automation systems. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MECA 1131)

MECA2110 Sensors and Control (3 credits)
This course will provide students with the principles of measurement and control systems. The student will gain an understanding of different sensor technologies used to measure and detect physical properties used in a variety of electro mechanical, electro hydraulic and electro pheumatic systems. The student, through lab work, will also learn how to use and troubleshoot sensors used in open and closed loop control systems. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. This course assumes the student understands basic electrical, mechanical, and programming concepts. (Prerequisites: MECA 1122)

MECA2115 SolidWorks II (3 credits)
Student will advance their SolidWorks skills beyond core concepts of parts, assemblies and drawings. Learning outcomes are designed to prepare students in the more advanced concepts evaluated in the Certified SolidWorks Associate Exam in areas such as: Advanced Parts, Advanced Assemblies, Advanced Surfacing, Sheet Metal, Routing and Simulation. (Prerequisite: None)

MECA2120 Fluid Power 1 (3 credits)
This course provides the basics of fluid powered devices and systems found in modern industrial machinery and automation. Topics include proper safety procedures, basic laws of fluid mechanics, standard symbols, pumps, control valves, control assemblies, actuators, maintenance procedures, and switching and control devices. At the completion of this course, the student will be able to apply basic laws of fluid mechanics to design and specify characteristics of a pneumatic system; select and size actuators and control valves, and match the pneumatic components with its American National Standards Institute (ANSI) symbol. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to identify long-term symptoms associated with a lack of preventive maintenance of pneumatic components while demonstrating good safety practices including lock out procedures. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisite: None)

MECA2123 Mechanical Systems 2 (3 credits)
This course includes an introduction to mechanical drives, bearing mechanisms, shaft alignment, shaft coupling, clutches and brakes. Also included is an introduction to industrial rigging using slings, hoists, cranes, scaffolds and ladders. Troubleshooting of mechanical systems will be emphasized. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisite: MECA 1223 and PHYS 101 or equivalent)

MECA2130 Fluid Power II (3 credits)
This course provides the basics of hydraulically operated devices and systems found in modern industrial machinery and automation. Topics include proper safety procedures, basic laws of fluid mechanics, standard symbols, pumps, control valves, control assemblies, actuators, maintenance procedures, and switching and control devices. At the completion of this course, the student will be able to design and specify characteristics of a hydraulic system, select and size actuators, and match the hydraulic component name with its American National Standards Institute (ANSI) symbol. Additionally, the student should be able to identify long-term symptoms associated with a lack of preventive maintenance of hydraulic components while demonstrating good safety practices including lock out procedures. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisite: MECA 2120)

MECA2150 Mechatronics Systems Operations II (3 credits)
This course will focus on advanced principles of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). The student will become familiar with interfacing input and output with automation motion control systems used in manufacturing. Introduction of analog inputs and outputs, internal registers and tables, comparison functions, computational functions, data move functions, subroutines, data manipulation and sequencing functions, high speed counting, analog functions, trigonometric and advanced math functions. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisite: MECA 1250)

MECA2220 Micromechanical Measurement and Positioning (4 credits)
This course will provide students with the principles of measurement, control and monitoring systems. The student will gain an understanding of different measurement and tracking tools such as vision systems, RFID tags and sensor technologies used to measure, detect and track the physical properties used in a variety of mechanical and fluid power systems. The student, through lab work, will also learn how to implement this knowledge in control systems. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. This course assumes the student understands basic electrical, mechanical, and programming concepts. (Prerequisites: MECA 2120, and 2150, or Instructor approval)

MECA2230 Robotics (4 credits)
This course will provide students with the principles of programming and control of automated systems and multi-axis robotic systems in an industrial environment. The student will gain the ability to simulate program, and implement various types of automated machine systems, integrate actuators and sensors commonly found in robotic systems, and setup an automated robotic work cell. The student will also perform fundamental automated system troubleshooting procedures. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. This course builds on the student's understanding of basic electrical, mechanical, pneumatic, and programming concepts. (Prerequisite: MECA 2150)

MECA2235 Robotics (3 credits)
This course will provide students with the principles of programming and control of multi-axis robotic systems used in an industrial environment. The student will gain the ability to program FANUC Robots and setup an automated robotic work cell. The student will also perform fundamental automated system troubleshooting procedures. Technical writing skills and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. This course builds on the student's understanding of basic electrical, mechanical and programming concepts. (Prerequisites: MECA 2110 Sensors and Controls and MECA 2150 Mechatronics System Operation II)

MECA2240 Senior Project (1 - 5 credits)
The Senior Project at South Central College (SCC) is an opportunity for students to demonstrate what they know and to showcase their achievement. The project must be successfully completed as a component of the Mechatronics program, which is a required course for all graduating seniors. The Senior Project is a fitting conclusion to a student's education because through this endeavor, one is able to demonstrate accumulated skills in reasoning, research, problem solving, human interaction, organization, and public speaking. This course may also include an internship and will follow the SCC internship guidelines. This course may also be taken in variable increments of 1 to 5 credits. (Prerequisite: MECA 2150 - Mechatronics Systems Operations I or consent of Instructor)

MECA2250 Mechatronics Systems Operations III (3 credits)
This course will focus on advanced principals of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). The student will become familiar with interfacing input and output with automation motion control systems used in manufacturing. Introduction of PLC networking, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), Proportional - Integral - Derivative (PID) Control and the use of Human Machine Interface (HMI) in a Control System. Troubleshooting exercises, technical writing assignments and safety procedures will be implemented throughout the course. (Prerequisite: MECA 2150)

MGT - Marketing

MGT2800 Sales Management (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply concepts and competencies gained from their academic studies. Training plans that are competency-based will be developed. (Prerequisites: MKT 1800)

MGT2810 Retail Management (3 credits)
This course focuses on the changing demographics of retail marketing, the growth of new retail formats and the use of information technology to enable quick responses to market dynamics through customer service, vendor-retailer partnering and employee diversity. (Prerequisites: None)

MGT2820 Introduction to Management Information Systems (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to management information systems (MIS) and involves the interactions between technology and business practices. The course involves the planning, organizing and controlling of information technologies related to organizational objectives. Specific attention will be given to database management with a focus on contact management. The course also involves the use of spreadsheet applications, collaborative tools, and other technologies utilized in the business environment. (Prerequisites: None)

MGT2830 Retail Operations (3 credits)
This course focuses on the components of retail operations and design. Retail design includes the necessary use of display for the effective visual presentation of goods and services. Opportunities will be provided to utilize the principles and techniques that are common to display work in various types of businesses. Emphasis will be placed on design, color, tools, materials and installation of displays. Topics include: design principles, color principles, tools and materials of the trade, props and fixtures, lighting and signing, installation of displays, store planning and safety.

MKT - Marketing

MKT1800 Introduction to Sales (3 credits)
This course serves as a foundation for future sales courses. The instructional approach combines both traditional and innovative presentations of course content that is dependent upon student involvement. The content covers the role of sales, steps of the selling process, the importance of communication skills and a positive attitude. In addition, special attention is devoted throughout the course on how the salesperson is viewed as an ambassador for the company that they represent. (Prerequisite: None)

MKT1810 Principles of Marketing (3 credits)
This course introduces the student to the dynamic field of marketing. The course will examine the different strategies and techniques used by business today to market their products and services to the consumer. The major emphasis will revolve around the four "P's" of marketing; product, price, place and promotion. (Prerequisite: None)

MKT1817 Internship (3 credits)
This course allows the student to receive practical experience in his/her chosen career area. A training plan outlining what will be learned is jointly developed among the student, employer and college. (Prerequisites: None)

MKT1820 Introduction to Business (3 credits)
This course covers the basic fundamentals of the world of business. Emphasis will be placed on the nature of business and the trends that will change the way business is conducted in the twenty-first century. The latest technology and business terms will provide an updated look at the business world.

MKT1830 Customer Service (3 credits)
This course covers the importance of customer service and how the student can achieve quality customer service. Total Quality Management is an essential part of customer service and how quality service is relayed to the consumer. This course explains how to develop a service attitude, dealing with various types of customers, handling customer complaints, decision making and using the team concept.

MKT1840 Principles of Advertising (3 credits)
This course provides a broad overview of the entire advertising and sales promotion industry. The focus will cover the entire spectrum of paid and non-paid activities designed to encourage the purchase and use of products, services and ideas. Discussion will include theory and practice about advertising media, public relations, packaging, special events, creation of ads and evaluation.

MKT1850 Professional Development I (1 credits)
This course focuses on the importance of professionalism and leadership opportunities. Students will have the opportunity to improve their understanding, interpretation and participation in a variety of activities within the college and their community. Attendance in professional conferences, seminars and meetings will be required.

MKT1860 Marketing and Business Management Practicum (2 credits)
This course is designed to assist Marketing and Business Management Students in learning more about actively giving back to the community through student learning projects and participating in internationally affiliated competitions through Collegiate DECA. Students will experience volunteer opportunities and professional growth opportunities through classroom projects and by attending professional development conferences in and outside of the state of Minnesota. Students will have the opportunity to meet and compete against similar two and four year institutions to improve personal and professional growth in the field of Marketing and Business Management. (Prerequisite: None)

MKT1875 Internet Marketing (2 credits)
This course provides an overview of Internet marketing and electronic commerce marketing. Issues involved with Business to Consumer (B2C), Business to Business (B2B), and Consumer to Consumer (C2C) E-Commerce will be explored.

MKT1900 Principles of Management (3 credits)
This course will introduce the student to the responsibilities and roles of managers and supervisors. Course focus will be on topics related to the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Project management, the decision-making process, organizational structures and team skills will be explored. (Prerequisites: None)

MKT1910 Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
This course utilizes a variety of tools to stimulate student interest and to promote learning. We will discuss the importance of entrepreneurship in our business climate with an emphasis on the small business. The course culminates with each student creating parts of a business plan. (Prerequisites: None)

MKT1920 Marketing Research (3 credits)
This course involves practical application of the concepts of involved in marketing research. Students will work in teams to explore the fundamentals of marketing research by completing a major project. The course content includes: finding secondary data, conducting focus groups, organizing observational research, creating surveys, statistical analysis and report writing.

MKT1930 Human Resource Management (3 credits)
This course focuses on human resource management issues. The course covers the techniques and legal aspects of recruiting, hiring, firing, promotion, documentation, evaluation and other areas essential to the personnel function. (Prerequisites: None)

MKT1940 Leadership Strategies (3 credits)
This course is designed to help students recognize their leadership potential and help improve their interpersonal skills needed in today's workplace. Students will explore various leadership strategies through self assessment and reflection. Self assessments will then be used to provide the framework for developing career portfolios. Resume development, interviewing skills and networking are an integral part of the course.

MKT1950 Special Topics in Marketing (2 credits)
All Special Topics in Marketing courses help students understand how marketing is part of and impacts consumers, business and society. Students will explore broad marketing concepts such as products, price, distribution and promotion through a specific topic of relevance. Any Special Topics in Marketing offering will be specially designed by an SCC Marketing instructor to appeal to SCC students. The instructor has chosen the subject material related to his or her interests, students' interests, or his or her teaching expertise. (Prerequisite: None)

MKT2817 Internship (3 credits)
This course allows students the opportunity to continue to develop their marketing & management skills in an internship. (Prerequisites: None)

MKT2827 Marketing Management Internship (1 - 3 credits)
This course allows the student to receive practical experience in his/her chosen career area. This internship is designed to offer students a customized experience. A training plan, outlining what will be learned, is jointly developed between the student, employer and the department site coordinator. This course is designed for students in Restaurant Management who need a minimum of 9 credits of internship or for Marketing Management or Business Management students wishing to further their internship experience with elective credits. (Prerequisites: It is recommended, after advisor review, that students register for this variable credit course after completing MKT 1817 & 2817)

MTT - Machine Tool Technology

MTT1110 CNC Milling Level I (5 credits)
This course provides the student an introduction to basic milling operations. Upon completion of this course the student will have an understanding of manual and Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling practices as well as gain knowledge in tooling, machining practices and applied mathematics. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included. (Prerequisite: Declare MTT as a major)

MTT1120 CNC Turning Level I (5 credits)
This course provides the student an introduction to basic lathe operations. Upon completion of this course the student will have an understanding of manual and Computer Numerical Control (CNC lathe turning practices as well as gain knowledge in tooling, machining practices and applied mathematics. Teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included. (Prerequisite: Declare MTT as a major)

MTT1130 Job Planning, Benchwork and Layout Level I (3 credits)
This course provides an exploration of the basics of hand tools, understanding drawings, manual machines and layout. Upon completion of this course the student will be able to interpret drawing information, describe basic symbols and notation and interpret basic Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) feature control frames. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included. (Prerequisites: Declare MTT as a major)

MTT1140 Measurement, Materials and Safety Level I (3 credits)
This course provides an exploration of the basics in machining, raw materials, use of hand tools, safety and maintenance. Topics include an overview of measurement techniques, materials, safety, machine tool math, quality control and maintenance. Teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving are emphasized. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included. (Prerequisite: Declare MTT as a major)

MTT1150 Machining Computations (1 credits)
This course is designed to provide foundations of the mathematical processes used in the technical field of machine tool practices. Topics will include arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and applications. (Prerequisite: Declare MTT as a major)

MTT1210 Concept Engineerin I (4 credits)
In this course, students will continue developing their understanding of machining and use of tools. Their skills are more fully developed in terms of lathe, milling, grinding and drill press. Hands-on experience and practical application opportunities allow students to increase proficiency with machine tools. (Prerequisites: MTT 1130 and MTT 1140)

MTT1220 CNC Programming I (4 credits)
This course prepares students to become an introductory (Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machine operator. The topics include machine safety, proper tool setup, tool/work offsets and CNC controller layout. This also includes a basic introduction to Mastercam. (Prerequisites: MTT 1110 and MTT 1120 )

MTT1230 Quality Assurance I (2 credits)
This course combines the use of precision inspection equipment, calibration of inspection equipment, methods of use for inspection equipment, print clarification and the basics of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T). (Prerequisites: MTT 1130 and MTT 1140)

MTT1240 Applications I (3 credits)
In this course, students will have the opportunity to continue to develop their skills on the lathe and mill with practical hands-on experiences in a lab setting. A continuation of set-up, operation and safety of lathe and mill will be reinforced in this course. (Prerequisites: MTT 1110 and MTT 1120)

MTT2110 Concept Engineering II (4 credits)
This course is an introduction to the grinding process as it pertains to machining. This includes an understanding of using pedestal grinders and an introduction to surface grinding. Fundamentals of grinding, such as appropriate wheel identification and use, will be addressed. Proper set-up, operation and safety of the bench, pedestal and surface grinders will be introduced in a lab setting. (Prerequisite: MTT 1210)

MTT2120 CNC Programming II (4 credits)
This course provides students with continuing opportunities to work with computer numerical control (CNC) programming, building on what was learned in the previous programming course. Topics include lathe programming, program downloading, editing and advanced set-ups and operations. (Prerequisite: MTT 1220).

MTT2130 Quality Assurance II (2 credits)
This course expands on the other courses concerning usage of prints and drawings in machining. Students will be provided with more learning opportunities, including continued hands-on interaction with symbols, notations, Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T), inspection equipment and continuous process improvement. (Prerequisite: MTT 1230)

MTT2140 Applications II (3 credits)
This course provides students with continuing opportunities to work on applying their skills, building on what was learned in the previous Applications course. Additional material is also introduced: topics include machining with carbide, producing heat treated parts and basic surface grinding. (Prerequisite: MTT 1240)

MTT2210 Concept Engineering III (4 credits)
The purpose of this course is to present the fundamentals of mold construction, processes involved in using molds and die casting. The knowledge and skills presented in this course will introduce the machinist to various terminologies and functions of Solidworks through 3D solid modeling and blueprint creation. (Prerequisite: MTT 2110)

MTT2220 CNC Programming III (4 credits)
This course provides students with continuing opportunities to work with CNC programming, building on what was learned in the previous programming course. Additional material includes alternative work holding and advanced tooling set-up and operation for production of an advanced project. (Prerequisite: MTT 2120).

MTT2230 Quality Assurance III (2 credits)
This course is a continuation of Quality Assurance II. New topics include more alternative measuring techniques and final inspection of advanced project. (Prerequisites: MTT 2130)

MTT2240 Applications III (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of Applications, new topics include alternative work holding and advanced tooling set-up and operation for production of capstone projects. (Prerequisite: MTT 2140)

MTT2250 MTT Capstone (4 credits)
This course provides students with continuing opportunities to work on applying their skills, building on what was learned in the previous Applications courses. Additional material is also introduced: topics include advanced grinding techniques. This is a variable credit course. (Prerequisites: MTT 2130 and MTT 2140)

MULT - Multimedia Technology

MULT2285 Multimedia Technology Capstone (1 - 4 credits)
The student will propose and produce a project in their area of interest. This plan is based on the college's and the program's core competencies. One credit of Capstone is equal to 32 hours. (Prerequisites: ART 140 Digital Photography 1 and ART 170 Video Production 1, OR instructor permission)

MULT2295 Multimedia Technology Internship (1 - 4 credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the Multimedia Technology field. Each internship is an individualized experience. A plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site to provide experience related to the skills and knowledge acquired in the program. This plan is based on the college's and the program's core competencies. One credit of Internship is equal to 48 hours. (Prerequisites: ART 140 Digital Photography 1 and ART 170 Video Production 1, OR instructor permission)

MUSC - Music

MUSC100 Music in the Global Culture (3 credits)
This course is a historical study of music and its relation to culture and society including a brief survey of the elements of music, incorporating the extensive use of audio recordings. Attendance at a live performance is required. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

MUSC121 Class Guitar (2 credits)
This class will offer our students the chance to learn how to play the guitar at the beginners level. Students who take this class must provide their own guitar. There will be individual instruction with the student along with class instruction. Students will start with the basics of how to tune their guitar both in standard tuning and alternate tunings. They will then create selected musical scale and learn how to play them on the guitar. They will then learn basic open-chords and bar-chords and how to play them in proper order. We will look at simple chord progressions of pop, rock and country music and will then learn how to play them on their guitar. Students will also learn the basics of a guitar solo. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities & Fine Arts)

MUSC131 Music Theory 1 (2 credits)
Music Theory 1 focuses on written music notation skills including scales, tonality, key modes, intervals, transposition, chords, cadences, non-harmonic tones and melodic organization. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.)

MUSC141 Vocal Ensemble - Concert Choir (1 credits)
Vocal Ensemble is a performing ensemble. Students will meet for rehearsals three times a week and learn a repertoire of both traditional and modern songs while practicing appropriate vocal techniques. After learning their music for several weeks in the semester, the vocal ensemble will perform at selected elderly and assisted care facilities in the area. (Prerequisite: None)

NURS - Nursing

NURS1110 Foundation of Nursing (2 credits)
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts in nursing. Students will discuss the role of the LPN as it relates to the nursing process and professionalism. Communication strategies will be applied for communication techniques, standardized communication, and documentation methods. Students will discuss cultural influences in health care. Legal and ethical aspects related to nursing will be discussed. Physical comfort, safety concerns, and nutrition are identified for health promotion using evidence-based practice concepts. Physical and psychological disorders are explained in the elderly population. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS1150 Clinical Foundation (3 credits)
This course provides an opportunity to integrate laboratory and actual clinical learning with supervised client care in a healthcare setting. Students utilize the nursing process to collect data, implement nursing interventions and administer medications, and begin the documentation process. Nursing care is individualized to meet each client's needs with consideration of the client's culture. Emphasis is placed on organization, critical thinking, therapeutic communication and a holistic approach to client care. Professional behavior is an expectation in this course. This course will also cover the characteristics of hazardous wastes and its safe handling, storage, and disposal. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS1175 Nursing Interventions (3 credits)
This course provides students the opportunity to learn nursing procedures in a simulated supervised lab setting. Basic comfort and safety devices will be demonstrated. Body systems are reviewed with an emphasis on the neurological, respiratory, gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems. Infection control theories and infection preventative measures will be described. Demonstration of interventions and use of devices related to asepsis, oxygenation, and elimination will be achieved. Introduction to common conditions associated with assessments and interventions will be explored. Concepts for care of the elderly will be applied. Critical thinking and medical terminology are threaded throughout the course. Students will be required to demonstrate skills learned in the laboratory setting. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS1220 Pharmacology for Practical Nurses (2 credits)
This course will address basic concepts of pharmacology and the effects on the body. The course focuses on drug classifications as they apply to all body systems. Understanding the therapeutic and adverse drug effects and appropriate actions will be addressed. The student will describe federal regulations to guide practice. The role of the practical nurse for client medication administration will be discussed using credible resources. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS1275 Medication Administration (1 credits)
This course introduces the student to the six rights of medication administration. The course will include non-parenteral administration routes including: oral, topical, nasal, rectal, eye, and ear. The course will also address safe medication administration utilizing the parenteral routes including: topical, intradermal, subcutaneous, intramuscular, and intravascular. Medication dosage calculations competency is expected. Medical terminology and abbreviations are threaded throughout the course. Best practices related to medication administration for the practical nurse will be used. This course will also cover the characteristics of hazardous wastes and its safe handling, storage, and disposal. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS1310 Application of Nursing (4 credits)
This course introduces the student to disease processes of the body systems: integumentary, respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, endocrine, cardiovascular, hematological, lymphatic, immune, neurological, sensory, reproductive, and musculoskeletal. Students will recognize signs and symptoms, as well as identify diagnostic tests, medications, and nutrition in the study of body system diseases. The student will use the nursing process to select effective treatments and interventions specific to the altered body systems. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 1 Courses in order to advance to Semester 2 Courses)

NURS1350 Clinical Application (4 credits)
Students will apply nursing theories for clients with a variety of health conditions and altered body systems. Application of knowledge includes client interaction across the lifespan in a variety of laboratory and actual health care settings. Nursing interventions are individualized to meet each client's needs with consideration of the client's culture. The nursing process is implemented with an emphasis on critical thinking. Organizational skills are developed with an opportunity to care for multiple clients. Students may have the opportunity to observe the role of the nurse in specialty areas. Students will demonstrate effective communication with other members of the health care team. Professional nursing behavior will be demonstrated. This course will also cover the characteristics of hazardous wastes and its safe handling, storage, and disposal. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 1 Courses in order to advance to Semester 2 Courses)

NURS1375 Laboratory Application (2 credits)
This course facilitates preparation for the future role of a licensed practical nurse (LPN). Emphasis is placed on understanding concepts of organizational structure and managing care as it relates to the LPN role and practice. Students will demonstrate ability to function within a variety of simulated client situations across the lifespan. Information technology including evidence-based practice will be used to meet client needs. Time management, prioritization, and effective, professional communication will be used to manage client care, enhance teamwork, and provide accurate information as a member of the interdisciplinary team. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 1 Courses in order to advance to Semester 2 Courses)

NURS1410 Maternal Child Nursing (2 credits)
The concepts of pregnancy, the fundamental principles of labor and delivery, and nursing care of the mother and newborn will be described and applied. The student is introduced to the fundamental concepts of growth and development. Common illnesses and disorders of the newborn and the child will be discussed. Throughout the course, maternal child nursing and pediatric care will include communication skills, specific medications, vaccinations, laboratory tests, assessments, nutrition, and cultural influences. Maternal child and pediatric quality care issues and current will be discussed. This course will also cover the characteristics of hazardous wastes and its safe handling, storage, and disposal. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 1 Courses in order to advance to Semester 2 Courses)

NURS1610 Psychosocial Nursing (2 credits)
This course introduces students to concepts in mental health and mental illness. The impact of culture and value systems on mental health is identified. Treatments discussed include medication and behavior therapy, crisis intervention, and group therapy. Appropriate nursing interventions for clients exhibiting maladaptive behaviors will be discussed. Clinical experience is included to reinforce theoretical concepts and quality client care. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 1 Courses in order to advance to Semester 2 Courses)

NURS2200 LPN to RN Role Transition (4 credits)
This course is intended to assist students to transition from the role of the Licensed Practical Nurse to the Associate Degree Nurse. Learning opportunities will occur in lecture, laboratory, and clinical settings. Transitional topics include differences in the scope of practice between the licensed practical nurse and the registered nurse. The nursing process is used as a framework for critical thinking and problem solving. Current and future trends in healthcare will be explored. Legal and ethical issues as they relate to nursing are discussed. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS2220 Semester 1 Fundamentals (1 credits)
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts in nursing. Topics include: nursing process, critical thinking, communication, cultural competence, professionalism, the multi-disciplinary team, scope of practice, nutritional concepts, and legal and ethical issues. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS2230 Semester 1 Pharmacology (2 credits)
This course provides students the opportunity to learn pharmacology concepts and biological influences on body systems. Drug classifications will provide the foundation for learning medications within groups including desired and undesired effects. Standards for safe practice will be identified. Students will use the nursing process for medication management. Use of current pharmacology and technology resources will be identified. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS2240 Fundamental Concepts (2 credits)
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts in nursing. Topics include: nursing process, critical thinking, communication, cultural competence, professionalism, the multi-disciplinary team, scope of practice, nutritional concepts, and legal and ethical issues. (Prerequisites: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS2250 Semester 1 Clinical Practice (2 credits)
This course provides an opportunity to integrate laboratory and supervised client care in the long-term health care setting. Students utilize the Nursing Process to collect data, implement nursing interventions and administer medications. Emphasis is placed on organization, critical thinking, therapeutic communication, and use of the EHR (electronic health record). Professional behavior will be modeled including ethics, maintaining confidentiality, and recognizing the hierarchy structure in health care. This course will also cover the characteristics of hazardous wastes and its safe handling, storage, and disposal. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS2275 Semester 1 Skills Lab (2 credits)
This course provides students the opportunity to learn basic nursing procedures, equipment, and health assessments in the laboratory setting. The six rights of medication administration and dosage calculation will be explained and practiced. Medical terminology, abbreviations, and documentation will be threaded throughout the course. Credible nursing resources will be identified. Competencies related to infection control, asepsis, patient safety, mobility, vital sign measurements, oxygenation, and elimination will be achieved. (Prerequisite: Acceptance into Nursing Program is required in order to register for Nursing Courses)

NURS2320 Semester 2 Med-Surg Basics (3 credits)
This course will focus on the medical-surgical nursing basics for assessment and planning of the care for adult patient with common illnesses. The emphasis is on the following systems/conditions: cardiaovascular, respiratory, endocrine, neurological, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, and renal. Case studies, discussions, group projects, software programs, and exams will be utilized in identifying the patient's response to illness. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 1 Courses in order to advance to Semester 2 Courses)

NURS2350 Semester 2 Clinical Practice (4 credits)
Students apply theory related to alteration in body systems through observation, assessment and interaction with clients in laboratory and acute care settings. Nursing interventions are individualized to meet each client's needs with consideration of the client's culture. The Nursing Process is implemented with an emphasis on critical thinking. Organizational skills are developed with opportunities to care for multiple clients. Students will demonstrate effective communication with other members of the multidisciplinary health care team. Professional nursing behavior will be demonstrated.This course will also cover the characteristics of hazardous wastes and its safe handling, storage, and disposal. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 1 Courses in order to advance to Semester 2 Courses)

NURS2375 Semester 2 Skills Lab and Pharmacology (2 credits)
Students will refine nursing skills including performing a health history, assessments, pharmacology, math competence, and advanced skills in the laboratory setting to enhance the acute care clinical experiences. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 1 Courses in order to advance to Semester 2 Courses)

NURS2420 Semester 3 Maternal-Child Health (2 credits)
This course introduces the student to the specialty area of Maternal Child Health. It will explore the unique health care considerations of women, children and their families. Incorporating growth and development theories, culture, legal, and ethical implications, and family centered patient education.This course explores antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, well-child care, and pediatric health issues and health promotion. The importance of family centered care is emphasized. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 2 Courses in order to advance to Semester 3 Courses)

NURS2430 Semester 3 Mental Health (2 credits)
This course introduces the student to the specialty area of Mental Health. The Mental Health content will explore the unique health care considerations for persons with mental illness across the lifespan. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 2 Courses in order to advance to Semester 3 Courses)

NURS2450 Semester 3 Clinical Practice (4 credits)
This course will focus on the client with specialized needs across the lifespan. Students will have the opportunity to explore the wonder of human gestation from conception to post-partum care of the newborn and mother. Pediatric nursing will be experienced in the clinical and simulation setting where theories of growth and development will be foundational in designing patient care. Family-centered care will be examined as the context of client development, response to illness and health promotion. External systems such as culture and religion will be considered as influencing client health and illness. Students will provide care for the client with complex multiple needs in the clinical setting. Concepts of mental health and illness will be explored in the clinical and simulation setting. Students will have the opportunity to observe, experience, and design nursing care for the hospitalized and community client with mental health needs. This course will also cover the characteristics of hazardous wastes and its safe handling, storage, and disposal. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 2 Courses in order to advance to Semester 3 Courses)

NURS2455 Semester 3 Clinical Practice Specialty (3 credits)
This course will focus on the client with specialized needs across the lifespan. Students will have the opportunity to explore the wonder of human gestation from conception to post-partum care of the newborn and mother. Pediatric nursing will be experienced in the clinical and simulation setting where theories of growth and development will be foundational in designing patient care. Family-centered care will be examined as the context of client development, response to illness and health promotion. External systems such as culture and religion will be considered as influencing client health and illness. Students will provide care for the client with complex multiple needs in the clinical setting. Concepts of mental health and illness will be explored in the clinical and simulation setting. Students will have the opportunity to observe, experience, and design nursing care for the hospitalized and community client with mental health needs. This course will also cover the characteristics of hazardous wastes and its safe handling, storage, and disposal. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 2 Courses in order to advance to Semester 3 Courses)

NURS2520 Semester 4 Leadership (1 credits)
This course introduces concepts related to leadership skills and management for nurses within the multidisciplinary health care team. Healthcare policy and regulatory processes impact on nursing practice are analyzed. Ethical principles and diversity are reviewed. Quality improvement concepts in health care are examined. Community service and education projects are implemented. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 3 Courses in order to advance to Semester 4 Courses)

NURS2530 Semester 4 Med-Surg Acute (4 credits)
This course synthesizes knowledge from previous semesters to provide care for hospitalized patients with complex medical-surgical needs. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 3 Courses in order to advance to Semester 4 Courses)

NURS2540 Semester 4 Med-Surg Acute (3 credits)
This course synthesizes knowledge from previous semesters to provide care for hospitalized patients with complex medical-surgical needs. (Prerequisites: NURS 2410, 2450, BIOL 270, COMM 130)

NURS2550 Semester 4 Clinical Practice (4 credits)
This course offers opportunities to care for patients across the lifespan in a variety of medical-surgical settings. The student will have opportunity to apply theory to practice in complex clinical situations. Critical thinking is supported by best practice and threaded throughout the course. The leadership role is explored in clinical and simulated laboratory experiences.The student nurse will be mentored by a practicing Registered Nurse in the patient care setting. The student will establish learning outcomes and identify areas of growth. Students will demonstrate professionalism and accountability for their actions. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 3 Courses in order to advance to Semester 4 Courses)

NURS2560 Semester 4 Med Surg Advanced (3 credits)
This course synthesizes knowledge from previous semesters to provide care for hospitalized patients with complex medical-surgical needs. (Prerequisites: Successfully complete all Semester 3 Courses in order to advance to Semester 4 Courses)

OTEC - Office Technology

OTEC0100 Computer Basics (2 credits)
The Computer Basics course is designed for students with little or no computer experience. In a small group setting, students will learn the basics of using a computer. Students will apply the information learned through a lecture to a hands-on, in-class experience lead by a knowledgeable instructor. (Prerequisites: None)

OTEC1001 Computer Software for College (2 credits)
This course covers basic information about computer hardware and software and the use of computer software as a business productivity tool. Students will be given introductory training on a Windows operating system and the common business applications of word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation graphics. This course is designed to equip the student with knowledge of hardware and software applications. This course will cover the business application software that will be used in more advanced courses. (Prerequisites: Basic computer skills or Computer Basic class; mouse proficiency, keyboarding skill of 25 words per minute)

OTEC1725 Transactional Law (3 credits)
This course will include an in-depth discussion and hands on experience in creation of documents for Minnesota real estate, probate, and corporate Law. Students will create documents and proofread for accuracy. Emphasis will be on Minnesota Law. (Prerequisites: Students must type at least 35 words per minute and have a working knowledge of Microsoft Word)

OTEC1730 Civil Procedures (3 credits)
This course will include an in depth discussion and hands on experience in creation of documents for the Minnesota and federal court systems, civil litigation and appeal procedures. Students will create documents and proofread for accuracy. This course will emphasize Minnesota procedures. (Prerequisites: Students must type at least 45 words per minute and have a working knowledge of Microsoft Word)

OTEC1790 Keyboarding for College (2 credits)
This course covers the development of basic keyboarding techniques using the touch-typing method of the computer. Emphasis will be on learning the touch-typing method of typing alphabetic, number and symbol keys. The keyboarding goal will be to attain a minimum rate of 35 words per minute with accuracy. (Prerequisites: None)

OTEC1815 Keyboarding for Speed and Accuracy (2 credits)
This course follows the basic keyboarding techniques using the touch method. Emphasis is on building speed and accuracy on a computer keyboard. It will require extensive and systematic skill building to achieve and improve speed and accuracy. (Prerequisite: A minimum speed of 35 words per minute on a 3-minute timed writing, with 3 errors or less)

OTEC1820 Business English (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with comprehensive, up-to-date instruction in the correct use of English grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, abbreviations, and number usage in written business communications. Students will develop proficiency in proofreading, identifying common errors, and using reference materials to correct sentences, paragraphs, and business documents. (Prerequisite: None)

OTEC1822 Microsoft Excel (4 credits)
This course prepares students to work with Microsoft Excel in a career setting or for personal use. It begins with the introduction of concepts such as creating, editing, and formatting worksheets in a uniform, attractive style. It includes inserting formulas, creating charts, and enhancing the display of worksheets of varying complexity. The course will move on to the advanced concepts and features of formatting, using functions, analyzing numerical data, and projecting outcomes to make informed decisions. Features of protecting workbooks, using macros, using pivot tables, and customizing the Excel environment are also included. Current communication needs will be met by including hyperlinks to external information, as well as importing, exporting, and sharing date. (Prerequisite: none)

OTEC1840 Microsoft PowerPoint (3 credits)
This course is designed to build student skill at both a basic and advanced level in Microsoft PowerPoint. It begins with the introduction of concepts such as creating a basic presentation with pictures, shapes, and WordArt, adding media and animation. It continues with the basic skills students need to acquire to use the application proficiently. Once students are proficient at the basic level, the course moves on to the advanced concepts and features such as customizing templates and handouts using masters, developing presentations with content from outside sources, and organizing slides and creating photo albums. (Prerequisites: None)

OTEC1860 Microsoft Word (4 credits)
This course is designed to build student skill at both a basic and advanced level in Microsoft Word. It begins with the introduction of concepts such as file management, entering text, editing, terminology, spelling, and printing. It continues with the basic skills students need to use the application proficiently. Once students are proficient at the basic level, the course moves on to the advanced concepts and features such as macros, merging, and tables. (Prerequisites: None)

OTEC2000 Employment Search Skills (2 credits)
This course introduces students to a process for developing self-awareness - considering career opportunities, constraints, choices, and consequences - identifying career related goals - and planning of work, education, and related experiences to attain specific career goals. Students will also create job search documents and develop interviewing skills. The students will develop an understanding of and appreciation for the job search process. Students will use Internet and library resources.

OTEC2735 Family and Criminal Law (3 credits)
This course will include an in depth discussion and hands on experience in creation of documents for the Minnesota family law and criminal procedures. Students will create documents using word processing and proofread for accuracy. Minnesota procedures will be emphasized. (Prerequisite: OTEC 1730)

OTEC2740 Legal Editing and Proofreading (3 credits)
This course covers transcription of dictated material into a variety of usable legal documents using word processing equipment/software. Emphasis will be on forms and materials, editing, proofreading, and correcting errors. (Prerequisites: OTEC 2735)

OTEC2800 Office Keyboarding (3 credits)
This course covers the continuing development of keyboarding speed and accuracy. Advanced document formatting, such as letters, tables with special features, templates, labels, mail merges, multi-page reports, columns, etc., will be included. Students will continue to develop proofreading skills as they format documents from straight copy, rough draft, handwritten copy, and arranged and unarranged sources. (Prerequisite: A minimum keyboarding speed of 40 words per minute on a 3-minute timing, with 3 errors or less or advisor approval.)

OTEC2810 Computer Technology (3 credits)
This course provides computer technical information that goes beyond the basics for college educated students. It covers not only hardware and software but the new, emerging technology trends that affect computing and everyday life. Topics such as networks, data security, personal privacy, online safety, digital rights, and Internet usage will be addressed. There will be an emphasis on social and ethical issues for thought-provoking course discussions. (Prerequisite: None)

OTEC2815 Employment Portfolio (3 credits)
This course is a capstone course for the Office Administration and Technology program. This course will focus on developing knowledge that will serve as a foundation for the student's employment search process by assisting him/her in the development of successful marketing strategies for employment. As a capstone course, students are given an online assessment of the use of software and keyboarding skills to ensure competence prior to graduation. The Training Skills Assessment (TSA) -- NOCTI will be administered during this course. Students will develop distinctive portfolios to assist in their career search. Limited to final semester Office Administration and Technology program students. (Prerequisites: OTEC1860, OTEC2820)

OTEC2820 Business Communications (3 credits)
This course covers the principles of effective writing and requires students to plan, compose, and format a variety of business communications. Emphasis is on proofreading, editing, and revising communications not just to make them correct but also to make them better. Types of communications may include letters, memos, e-mail, announcements, instructions, form letters, and digital media. Specific letter or memo types may include request and response, claim and adjustment, persuasive, credit and collection, and goodwill communications. Students will learn about letter and envelope formats, international communication differences, and organizational approaches for writing correspondence. Students will learn about words to avoid, transitions, parallel structure, and the you attitude. (Prerequisite: OTEC 1820)

OTEC2830 Microsoft Publisher (3 credits)
Students will integrate word processing, graphics, and manipulate text graphics to produce professional quality publications. The topics covered are most useful to the student who has prior word processing experience and who needs to understand page compositions and typography for the purpose of preparing documents with flair. The course introduces the concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications of desktop publishing. Design concepts are limited to those useful in business applications and are not intended to present a "graphics/commercial art" focus. The emphasis will be on developing proficiency, preparing applications-based projects, and mastery of the software. Microsoft Publisher 2013: Complete is intended for a first course on Publisher 2013. No experience with a computer is assumed, and no mathematics beyond the high school freshman level is required. (Prerequisites: None)

OTEC2850 Integrated Information Systems (3 credits)
This is an intensive course that provides project-based learning with a business scenario setting utilizing critical thinking skills. The projects emphasize the integration of various computer applications to create professional documents. Students will incorporate time management, electronic communication, Internet searches, and current technology practices to be successful in an office work setting. (Prerequisites: OTEC 1822, OTEC 1840, OTEC 1860, OTEC 2870)

OTEC2860 Office Management (3 credits)
This course covers the managerial and organizational processes of Administrative Office Management; office environmental management, which include office layout, office environment, and office equipment and furniture; office employee management, which includes selecting, developing, supervising, and motivating office employees as well as performance appraisal, job analysis, job evaluation, salary administration, and work measurement and productivity; office systems analysis; and office functions management. (Prerequisites: OTEC 1860 Microsoft Word, OTEC 2820 Business Communications)

OTEC2865 Special Problems (1 - 4 credits)
This course allows the student to pursue special projects or areas of interest. The topics and the number of credits must be agreed upon by instructor prior to registration.

OTEC2870 Information Resource Management (3 credits)
This course covers rules and procedures for coding, indexing, filing, and retrieving documents in alphabetical, numeric, geographic, and subject systems. Applications include simulated correspondence filing and card filing using both manual and electronic methods. Students will learn how to use database management software to manage information. Records management topics emphasize records control and retention, final disposition of records, and records management issues and trends. (Prerequisite: None)

OTEC2905 Internship (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide the student with a purposeful occupational experience in the Office Administration and Technology field. The internship is an individualized experience. A plan is created for each student in conjunction with the training site to provide experience related to the skills and knowledge acquired in the program. This plan is based on the college's and the program's core competencies. (Prerequisites: OTEC 1822, OTEC 1860, OTEC 2820 or Internship Coordinator's approval.)

PHIL - Philosophy

PHIL100 Ethics in Society (3 credits)
This course studies the foundations for moral beliefs and values and the part they play in practical ethical judgments. After providing a general introduction to moral concepts and theories, the course covers a wide range of social problems through an analysis of power, privilege, and justice. The class is organized by overarching themes of race, social class, gender, and global concerns and addresses issues involving criminal justice, economic inequality, gender differences, and sexuality. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 7, 9)

PHIL105 World Religions (4 credits)
This course is a basic introduction to the major world religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It also explores related issues in the Philosophy of Religion. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

PHIL110 Philosophy and Popular Culture (3 credits)
This course introduces some basic concepts in philosophy and identifies positions taken on these concepts by important figures in the Western tradition. This course utilizes examples from popular culture to illustrate and elucidate these ideas and critically analyzes themes within and specific aspects of contemporary culture. Finally, it encourages students to articulate, develop, and defend their own views on perennial issues in philosophy. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

PHIL115 Global Philosophies (3 credits)
This course provides a practical introduction to the discipline of philosophy. In addition to exploring what philosophy has meant in Western society, this course will survey perspectives on philosophy in non-Western cultures -- including Indian, Chinese and indigenous traditions. It will explore how different philosophical schools have answered several "essential questions" regarding human nature, the purpose of life, and how society should be structured to maximize human flourishing. Special emphasis will be placed on philosophies which offer practical guidance for living, and students will be encouraged to develop and articulate their own philosophical perspective. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.)(MNTC Goal Areas 6, 8)

PHIL130 Logic (4 credits)
In this course we will explore some of the methods and principles that distinguish logically correct from incorrect reasoning. We will also learn to use formal techniques to evaluate the cogency of everyday argumentation. Most of the semester will be spent becoming familiar with a variety of elementary logical techniques and rules: distinguishing inductive from deductive arguments, valid from invalid arguments, mastering the formal rules of inference, truth tables and the propositional logic. Some find this material fascinating in its own right. Others value logic for the light it casts on everyday argumentation, and for its uses in philosophy, mathematics, and computing. Logical skills are not only an important component of aptitude tests such as the GRE and LSAT, but are also valuable in almost any course or job that involves using analytical techniques. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 2, 4: Critical Thinking, Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

PHIL150 Medical Ethics (3 credits)
This course examines the moral problems confronting medical providers and surveys the broader field of bioethics. After providing a general introduction to ethical concepts and theories, it focuses on specific issues relating to the American health care system, including access to care, inequality, obesity, reproductive rights, end-of-life care, disability, organ transplantation, and alternative medicine. Emphasis is placed on practical application of moral principles and critical analysis of case studies. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 2, 9)

PHIL205 Special Topics in Philosophy: (1 - 3 credits)
All PHIL 205 courses will help students learn about other areas of philosophy which are important to the study of other disciplines and philosophy itself. Students will explore broader areas of philosophical concern such as metaphysics (free-will, truth, realism, universals, necessity/contingency, causation, mind, time, God, etc.); epistemology (skepticism, inferential justification, knowledge, internalism/externalism, a priori/a posteriori, closure, direct/indirect realism, memorial knowledge, etc.); meta-ethics (moral knowledge, oral realism/anti realism, ethical intuitionism, reductionisms such as utilitarianism, relativism, subjectivism, divine command theory, contractarianism, Aristotelianism/teleology, virtue ethics, etc.). Furthermore, students can also focus on political philosophy, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of science or specialize in some facet of the above topics. All PHIL 205 courses will emphasize the use of primary texts and the development of philosophical thought throughout history. These courses will focus on the most basic questions of human existence (this indeed is philosophy) such as truth, knowledge, free-will, moral rightness, justice, and so forth. We assume answers to these questions in every other study we partake in. For instance, science presupposes the legitimacy of inductive reasoning, the law of non-contradiction, the justification of using inference to the best explanation, the uniformity of nature, the reliability of perception, the nature and possibility of a posteriori knowledge and others. These courses will deal with the questions we presuppose answers to in discussing those things that matter to us. In the end, PHIL 205 courses will give philosophy instructors and students the opportunity to explore areas of philosophy which are of interest not only to the psychologist, historian, and novelist, but also to those who wish to pursue a career in philosophy or become competent in philosophical problems. As Socrates said, "the unexamined life is not worth living." These courses will help encourage others to avoid the unexamined life. (Prerequisite: Any 100 level PHIL course or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

PHIL210 Environmental Ethics (3 credits)
This class explores the place of human beings within the broader ecosystem, focusing on the environmental impact of human behavior and sustainable alternatives to consumerist lifestyles. In addition to surveying the scientific evidence for the ecological problems humans cause, it addresses the political, economic, cultural, philosophical and religious dimensions of the current environmental crisis. The class also includes discussion and application of solutions to these problems, encouraging students to become involved in environmental activism and consider changes in their own behavior. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 9, 10: Ethical and Civic Responsibility, People and the Environment)

PHIL215 Business Ethics (3 credits)
The intent of this course is to show that the world of business traffics in the world of ethics. Business is not a neutral domain where one may do as one pleases. For instance, there is the question of what sorts of obligations businesses have toward their employees. Do businesses have a positive moral duty to promote social goods? Do they have a primary obligation or do their moral responsibilities comprise a set of different and equally important obligations? We will examine several views of the moral relation between businesses and others including the stockholder theory and the stakeholder theory. The goals of this course are to become acquainted with the architecture of morality, master the various moral theories and their unique implications for business, and to gain facility sliding between talk of each and applying each in various business contexts. We will examine various moral theories like utilitarianism and deontological type theories and then examine them in the context of applied business ethical issues. We will also look at broader issues about the nature of a just society and just economy in which the business is to function. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 2, 9: Critical Thinking, Ethical & Civil Responsibility)

PHLE - Phlebotomy

PHLE1000 Anatomy & Physiology (2 credits)
This course provides the student with a basic understanding of the structure and function of the human body. Instruction includes terminology, function, structure, diagnostic tests, and disorders of the anatomical systems. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1810)

PHLE1100 Legal/Ethical Issues for Phlebotomists (1 credits)
This course familiarizes the student with various legal and ethical issues that affect their activities as a healthcare professional. The topics of instruction include, but are not limited to, confidentiality, patient bill of rights, right of privacy, and patient consent. (Prerequisites: MDLT 1810)

PHLE1200 Multiskilling for Phlebotomists (3 credits)
This course cross trains the phlebotomy student in several different skill areas within the laboratory. Instruction includes EKGs, CLIA'88 waived procedures, and POCT (point-of-care-testing). (Prerequisites: MDLT 1810 or Program Director permission)

PHLE1300 Internship (5 credits)
PHLE1300 constitutes the student's clinical rotation. It consists of 160 contact hours of supervised practice of phlebotomy at an affiliated hospital or clinic. Internship experiences are specifically planned and implemented through the coordinated efforts of the faculty and staff of South Central College and the internship site. (Prerequisites: All support and technical phlebotomy coursework must be completed or Program Director permission)

PHLE1400 Intro to Phlebotomy (4 credits)
This course provides an orientation that familiarizes the student with a career in the field of Phlebotomy. The course will include a basic overview of the structure and function of the human body, various legal and ethical issues that affect a healthcare professional and specific phlebotomy topics. These topics include: program policies, certification, safety, infection control, quality control, specimen collection/handling/processing, good laboratory technique and maintaining the standards of a Phlebotomist based on industry criteria. (Concurrently with PHLE1450 & PHLE 1500 or Program Director permission)

PHLE1450 Phlebotomy Skills (3 credits)
This course teaches students phlebotomy skills which will be further enhanced during the clinical internship. This course also cross trains the phlebotomy student in several different skill areas within the laboratory. Instruction includes EKGs (electrocardiograms), CLIA'88 (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment) waived procedures, and POCT (point-of-care-testing). (Concurrently with PHLE 1400 & PHLE 1500 or Program Director permission)

PHLE1500 Phlebotomy Internship (3 credits)
This course constitutes the student's clinical rotation. It consists of 100 contact hours of supervised practice of phlebotomy at an affiliated hospital or clinic. Internship experiences are specifically planned and implemented through the coordinated efforts of the faculty and staff of South Central College and the internship site. (Prerequisite: Completion of PHLE 1400 and PHLE 1450 with a grade of C or higher.)

PHRM - Pharmacy Technician

PHRM1110 Pharmacy Technician Orientation (1 credits)
In this course students will gain a historical perspective of the pharmacy profession along with an understanding of the role of the pharmacy technician. Emphasis is placed upon the duties and responsibilities of the pharmacy technician along with an introduction to the various pharmacy practice settings. Students will also be required to complete the required paperwork for the pharmacy technician program. This course is intended to satisfy goals 23 and 41 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (Prerequisite: None)

PHRM1111 Pharmacy Law and Ethics (1 credits)
This course will give students a general understanding of the laws and regulations that govern pharmacy practice. This course will also cover the ethical principles governing the pharmacy technician and the roles they play in a practice setting. This course is intended to satisfy goals 2, 3, 6, 7, 11, 14, 17 and 29 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health System Pharmacists. (Prerequisite: None)

PHRM1112 Retail Pharmacy (2 credits)
This course is designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the retail pharmacy. Emphasis is placed on the role and responsibilities of the pharmacy technician in the retail pharmacy environment. Students will be given opportunities to apply these skills as active participants in the mock retail pharmacy environment. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 24, 26 and 27 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (Prerequisites: PHRM 1110, 1111)

PHRM1113 Pharmacy Math (4 credits)
In this course students will learn basic terminology, abbreviations and units necessary to perform pharmacy calculations. Pharmaceutical measuring systems and conversions will be addressed as well as a review of calculations pertinent to pharmacy practice. Students will learn to calculate the correct oral and parenteral dosages of drugs and other ingredients using information from prescriptions, medication orders, and drug labels. During the laboratory portion of the course, students will be given an opportunity to demonstrate a practical application of concepts. This course is intended to satisfy goals 2, 3, 15, 25 and 27 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (Prerequisites: CHEM 108, PHRM 1110)

PHRM2114 Pharmacology (4 credits)
Students will gain knowledge of pharmacology, including a systematic approach to the classifications of medications, their indications and contraindications, mechanisms of action, side effects, drug interactions, and methods of administration. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1, 24, 25, 26, and 34 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technical training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacist. (Prerequisites: HC 1000, 1914, PHRM 1110)

PHRM2115 Pharmacy Non-Sterile Compounding (2 credits)
This course will enable students to learn general preparation of non-sterile pharmaceutical dosage forms. Practical experience in the manipulative and record keeping functions associated with compounding and the dispensing of compounded prescriptions will be provided. This course is intended to satisfy goals 3, 11, 12, and 35 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (Prerequisites: PHRM 1113)

PHRM2116 Institutional Pharmacy (4 credits)
In this course, students will learn general practices associated with institutional pharmacy services. The student will also acquire knowledge of aseptic technique through both demonstrations and hands on experiences in the preparation of sterile compounds and IV admixtures. This course covers the preparation, calculations, and procedures for intravenous drug admixtures, TPN compounding, and critical care admixtures. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in various pharmacy technician duties using the Pyxis Medstation. This course is intended to satisfy goals 2, 3, 5, 10, 12, 26, 27, 30, and 35 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (Prerequisite: PHRM 1113)

PHRM2117 Community Pharmacy Internship (4 credits)
In this course students will take part in a pharmacy practice experience in the community setting to refine skills necessary for employment as a pharmacy technician. Students will participate in their internship experience along with on-line and in-class participation. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, and 35 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (Prerequisites: PHRM 1112, 1113, 2114)

PHRM2118 Pharmacy Technician Seminar (1 credits)
This course is designed for students to discuss pertinent topics related to the internship experiences as well as their futures as pharmacy technicians. This course is also designed to aid the student in the review of materials prior to the PTCE exam. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1-35 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (Prerequisite: None)

PHRM2119 Institutional Pharmacy Internship (4 credits)
This course will offer an intense pharmacy practice experience in an institutional setting with the purpose of refining skills introduced in previous coursework that are necessary to pursue a career as a pharmacy technician. Students will participate in their internship experience along with on-line and in-class participation. This course is intended to satisfy goals 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, and 35 of the model curriculum for pharmacy technician training, developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. (Prerequisites: PHRM 2116)

PHYS - Physics

PHYS101 Introductory Physics (3 credits)
A one semester course covering the basic principles of physics at a conceptual level and with a minimal amount of math. Topics generally included mechanics, simple machines, atomic structure, heat, light, and sound. Lecture and laboratory. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 250 to 300 AND Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 200 to 236 or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher AND Elementary Algebra score of 0 to 75 or completion of MATH 0075 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

PHYS211 Principles in Physics I (4 credits)
This is the first half of a one-year sequence in physics. It covers the general background in algebra-based physics. Topics include classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, wave and sound, thermal physics. Lecture and laboratory. (Prerequisites: MATH 120 and 125, or MATH 130) (MNTC: 3, Natural Sciences)

PHYS212 Principles in Physics II (4 credits)
This second course will provide students with the principles of algebra based physics. The course will cover basic principles of waves, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and topics in modern physics. (Prerequisite: PHYS 211) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

PHYS221 General Physics I (4 credits)
This course will provide students with the principles of calculus based physics. The course has been designed for students who plan advanced study of science and/or engineering. The course will cover basic principles of mechanics including kinematics, statics, equilibrium and dynamics of particles, work and energy, rotational motion, gravitation, and oscillation. (Prerequisites: High School Physics, PHYS 101 or 211, MATH 131 with a grade of "C" or better or by instructor permission) (MNTC: 3, Natural Sciences)

PHYS222 General Physics II (4 credits)
This second course will provide students with the principles of calculus based physics. The course has been designed for students who plan advanced study of science and/or engineering. The course will cover basic principles of waves in light and sound; temperature, heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics; electric charge; electric fields; Gauss' Law; electric potential; capacitance; resistance; electrical circuits; magnetic fields; induction; electromagnetic oscillations; and Maxwell's Equations. (Prerequisites: PHYS 221 with a grade of "C" or better, MATH 132 with a grade of "C" or better or by instructor permission) (MNTC: 3, Natural Sciences)

PLSC - Agri-Business

PLSC1100 Soils I (3 credits)
This course has a lecture and a lab component. Areas of study will include the physical properties, chemical properties, biological properties, soil formation, classification, essential nutrient and soil survey. There will be emphasis on soil and water conservation and practices that can be used to reduce soil erosion. Evaluations of soil samples will be conducted in the agribusiness lab and in the field. (Prerequisites: None)

PLSC1105 Forages and Pasture Management (2 credits)
This course includes the study of the management and production of small grains and forages. Subject areas will include varietal selection, planting, calculating yields, production costs, growth management, harvesting techniques and marketing techniques. The forage management will focus on alfalfa production, emphasis on establishment, winter survival, fertilization, cutting management and variety selection. (Prerequisites: None)

PLSC1200 Soils II (3 credits)
This course covers both the technical and practical information that should be of assistance to a student who would farm or go into the fertilizer business. The course deals with the basic soil-plant relationships and the effects of fertility. Detailed information on fertilizer materials and the information of test results will also be covered. Students will put into practice many of the cropping practices that are required by someone pursuing a career in the fertilizer and/or chemical field. Students will determine the proper rates and application methods. (Prerequisites: PLSC 1100)

PLSC1205 Precision Agriculture (3 credits)
The course objectives include basic understanding of precision agriculture, high-tech equipment, and strategies. Students will gain an understanding of the hardware, software and management strategies of precision agriculture. Areas of study will include GIS, GPS, remote sensing, differential correction, yield monitoring, and grid mapping. Farmworks software will be incorporated into the course.

PLSC1300 Agronomy I (2 credits)
This course covers agronomy principles for midwest crops. The course covers basic components of plant growth, seed quality, plant parts, plant growth and development, plant classification, maturity systems and seeding rates. Corn and soybean production will be major crops of consideration. (Prerequisites: None)

PLSC1400 Agronomy II (3 credits)
This course considers the characteristics and identification of noxious and common weeds and weed seeds, methods of control, evaluation of herbicide performance and tolerance to herbicides. Topics on herbicide characteristics, formulations and application methods will be taken into account in determining the most economic method of weed control. (Prerequisite: PLSC 1300)

PLSC2000 Commercial Pesticide License Training (1 credits)
This course is designed to complement other courses offered in weed, insect and disease control and pesticide application so as to help facilitate the student with skills necessary to pass the state examinations for applicator licensing and the federal examination for private applicator licensing. (Prerequisite: None)

PLSC2100 Agronomy Lab (2 credits)
This course covers the determination of grain quality, proper storage and handling. Laboratory exercises will be run on grain samples and student's home grains. Grain drying systems will be explained with advantages and disadvantages of each system identified. This course covers commercial grain grading practices including seed identification and grain grading. The course will also cover state grain marketing procedures and an introduction to USDA standards for corn, soybeans, wheat, oats, barley and sunflowers. (Prerequisite: None)

PLSC2700 Advanced Agronomy (3 credits)
This course includes units of instruction on management practices in the production of corn & soybeans, the economic and environmental aspects of soil damage systems, nutrient management recommendations for nitrogen and phosphorus, and current topics in the agronomy field. Classes will include speakers from the agricultural industry to address the current topics. The lab portion of the course will include grading corn and soybean samples as well on labs as plant genetics.(Prerequisites: PLSC 1300 and PLSC 1400)

POL - Political Science

POL110 American Government (3 credits)
American Government introduces students to the fundamentals of American National Government. The course includes an examination of basic American political principles and practices, the Constitution, major institutions, and civil liberties. The objective of this course is to acquaint students with the complexities of the American political system. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

PSYC - Psychology

PSYC100 Introduction to Psychology (4 credits)
This course will introduce the broad spectrum of theories and applications that make up the field of psychology. Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes, and how they are affected by physical and mental states, and external environments and social forces. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences)

PSYC110 Lifespan Psychology (3 credits)
This is an introductory course examining human development across the lifespan, with emphasis on normal physical, cognitive, and social development. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

PSYC140 Psychology of Positive Adjustment (4 credits)
The Psychology of Positive Adjustment introduces students to the scientific literature on positive adjustment to modern life. We will examine the questions: What is well-being and happiness? Who achieves it? Why does it elude some people? Which practices foster well-being and happiness? We will draw from the research in social psychology, neuroscience, personality psychology, cognitive psychology and sociocultural psychology. The course will incorporate the concepts of ethical living, values clarification, and civic responsibility as part of the mature development of psychological well-being. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

PSYC210 Social Psychology (4 credits)
Social Psychology introduces the broad spectrum of theories and applications that make up the field of social psychology. Social Psychology is the scientific study of human interactions and includes issues of aggression, attraction, self, benevolence, attitude development and change, prejudice, etc. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or any other college-level psychology course) (MNTC 5, 8: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

PSYC220 Health Psychology (4 credits)
Health psychology is a subfield of psychology that addresses the mental, emotional, behavioral, and societal factors that influence the onset, duration, recovery, and prevention of illness and the promotion of wellness. Students will explore the theoretical foundations of health psychology and the role of psychological research and principles relevant to the field. Students will be exposed to a variety of topics including stress and coping, preventative behaviors and attitudes, treatment options, and management of pain and illness. Students will gain an understanding of the academic issues and a respect for the human experience related to health, illness, and disease. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology or any other college-level psychology course. Must have a score of 77.5 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 5: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences)

PSYC230 Abnormal Psychology (4 credits)
In this course, students will increase their awareness and understanding of mental illness and psychological disorders. Students will become familiar with the history of the field, clinical descriptions, classification, etiology, course of onset, and typical treatment regimens specific to various disorders and mental illness. Abnormal behavior will be explored from various theoretical perspectives including psychological, biological, and socio-cultural approaches. (Prerequisites: 8 credits of psychology or consent of instructor) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

PSYC240 Child and Adolescent Psychology (4 credits)
This course examines the development of children from conception through adolescence. The major areas of focus include physical, cognitive, language, moral, and social development. The developing child will be understood as an active participant in a world of biological, familial, social, and cultural influences that help shape his or her individual life path. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

PSYC250 Industrial Organizational Psychology (4 credits)
Industrial-organizational (I/O) psychology is the scientific study of the workplace. Students will be introduced to a variety of issues of relevance to business and industry, including selection and placement of employees, the importance of training and development, organizational development and evaluation, employee motivation and productivity, and the importance of fostering work-life balance. Diversity among organizations and cultures in how they approach these issues will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

PSYC280 Special Topics in Psychology: (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding of a special topic within the field of psychology. Key theoretical and historical underpinnings will be presented to prepare a foundation of understanding. Attention will be focused on how the topic has or may add to the knowledge base of psychology and, if applicable, other academic disciplines. Students will explore the actual or potential applicability of the topic to self, others, and society at large. The course will have a research component. Course may address one of Goal Areas 7-10 depending on the topic. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor) (MNTC 5: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences)

QFPR - Culinary Arts

QFPR1842 Stocks, Sauces and Soups (3 credits)
This course covers the preparation of classical and convenience stocks. From these stocks, different soups and sauces will be prepared using various preparation techniques. (Prerequisites: None)

QFPR1846 Introduction to Breakfast and Pantry (3 credits)
This course teaches the cooking of meats, eggs, cereals, potatoes, batter products and the preparation of fresh fruits for breakfast and the proper techniques and procedures for the preparation of salads, salad dressings and sandwiches. This course will include commercial production techniques used in the preparation of breakfast and pantry foods. (Prerequisites: None)

QFPR1850 Basic Baking (4 credits)
This course covers baking terminology, function of ingredients, and the preparation of finished products such as quick breads, pies, cakes, cookies, dessert sauces, custards, puddings and classical pastries. (Prerequisites: None)

QFPR1880 Quality Assurance (2 credits)
This course develops an understanding of the basic principles of sanitation and safety in order to maintain a safe and healthy environment for the consumer in the food service industry. An understanding of the laws and regulations related to sanitation in food service operation is also covered. (Prerequisites: None)

READ - Reading

READ0080 Reading I (4 credits)
This college reading course offers a step-by-step approach to building the reading skills needed to successfully comprehend college-level textbook readings. Students practice reading comprehension skills and strategies, and then apply them to college-level textbook readings. Students also work on vocabulary acquisition through the study of academic words typically found in college-level reading materials. Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards in Reading are indicated in parentheses after each competency on the Common Course Outline. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 224 to 236 or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 36 to 55 or MCA Reading score between 750 - 1041)

READ0085 Reading and Critical Thinking I and II Modular (6 credits)
In this beginning and intermediate combination reading course, students first practice basic reading strategies using a computer-based reading program. They practice only the reading skills in which they are deficient. Deficiencies are identified by a diagnostic reading test taking at the beginning of the course. After practicing basic reading strategies in a computer-based reading program, students then expand and apply these reading strategies in Reading and Critical Thinking II, the application section of the course. The application section takes place in an actual classroom, and utilizes reading textbooks and supplemental literature in the application of reading strategies and concepts learned. Students must score 50-62 on the Reading Comprehension portion of the Accuplacer Test in order to enroll in this course. A grade of "C" or better is required for successful completion of this course. This course does not fulfill General Education requirements. This course is equivalent to READ 0090. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 50-62 on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test)

READ0090 Reading and Critical Thinking II (4 credits)
This intermediate-to-advanced reading course focuses on applying the reading strategies, concepts, and skills learned in Reading I. This application course utilizes college-level texts of all genres in the application of reading comprehension strategies, concepts, and skills. A grade of "C" or better is required for successful completion of this course. This course does not fulfill General Education requirements. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 237 to 249 or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 56 to 77 or MCA Reading score of 1042 to 1046 or completion of READ 0080 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher).

RNEW - Energy Technical Specialist

RNEW1100 Process Dynamics (MN West) (3 credits)
This course is offered through Minnesota West Community & Technical College. Please refer to the course description located at the MN West website: www.mnwest.edu

RNEW1101 Ethanol Process Fundamentals (MN West) (2 credits)
This course is offered through Minnesota West Community & Technical College. Please refer to the course description located at the MN West website: www.mnwest.edu

RNEW1102 Biodiesel Process Fundamentals (MN West) (2 credits)
This course is offered through Minnesota West Community & Technical College. Please refer to the course description located at the MN West website: www.mnwest.edu

RNEW1115 Mechanical Fundamentals (MN West) (3 credits)
This course is offered through Minnesota West Community & Technical College. Please refer to the course description located at the MN West website: www.mnwest.edu

RNEW1175 Industrial Water Treatment (MN West) (2 credits)
This course is offered through Minnesota West Community & Technical College. Please refer to the course description located at the MN West website: www.mnwest.edu

RNEW1195 Feedstock, Technology & Regulations (MN West) (2 credits)
This course is offered through Minnesota West Community & Technical College. Please refer to the course description located at the MN West website: www.mnwest.edu

RNEW1300 Introduction to Traditional/Renewable Energy (MN West) (3 credits)
This course is offered through Minnesota West Community & Technical College. Please refer to the course description located at the MN West website: www.mnwest.edu

RNEW2120 Ethanol Separation Technology (MN West) (2 credits)
This course is offered through Minnesota West Community & Technical College. Please refer to the course description located at the MN West website: www.mnwest.edu

RSTM - Restaurant Management

RSTM2819 Restaurant Management (3 credits)
This course is designed to be industry specific; covering a wide range of restaurant management topics. Emphasis will include information on security measures, cash register operation, cash flow, crisis outbreak management, food service franchising, training, scheduling and legal topics unique to the food industry. The focus of the course will be on food retailing and management concepts.

SBMT - Small Business Management

SBMT1110 SBM Organizational Planning (2 credits)
In this class the student will do a business self-study, create a mission and vision statement and set business and personal goals. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT1120 SBM Business Systems (3 credits)
In this class the student will begin preparing the business plan including the strategic plan and all business systems. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT1210 SBM Financial Systems (3 credits)
In this class the student will design, evaluate and apply an appropriate record keeping system for the business and learn to interpret financial statements. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT1220 SBM Financial Management (3 credits)
In this class the student will study cost controls and break-even analysis. They will also learn the process of pricing products and services for the business. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT1230 SBM Financial Analysis (3 credits)
In this class the student will study how to analyze the profit and loss statement, the balance sheet and how to do ratio and trend analysis. (Prerequisites: SBMT 1210)

SBMT1310 SBM Marketing Systems (2 credits)
In this class the student will identify the 5 P's of marketing for the business, identify and refine the business image, and create a marketing strategy for the business. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT1320 SBM Marketing Management (2 credits)
In this class the student will learn advertising and promotional techniques and create an advertising plan. They will also learn the basics of selecting appropriate media and ad design. (Prerequisites: SBMT 1310)

SBMT1410 SBM Personnel Systems (3 credits)
In this class the student will learn recruiting and hiring techniques for the business. They will also study training methodology and how to create personnel files and manuals. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT1900 Introduction to Small Business Management (1 credits)
This class is designed for those individuals considering or in the process of starting a business. The class will focus on exploring business opportunities, planning and creating an overall business plan, and financial considerations for start-up. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2130 SBM Record Keeping (3 credits)
In this class the student will identify source documents and practice data entry, general journal entries, sales journal entries and expense journal entries. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2131 SBM Asset & Inventory Management (2 credits)
In this class the student will learn the process of managing assets, asset allocation and inventory so as to improve business profitability. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2132 SBM A/R & A/P Management (2 credits)
In this class the student will learn the process of managing the accounts receivable, creating reports and establishing customer credit guidelines. The student will also learn the process of managing accounts payable, creating reports and controlling cash flow. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2133 SBM Reconciliation & Closing Accounts (2 credits)
In this class the student will learn the process of reconciling and closing accounts, and matching account summaries to appropriate documents. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2134 SBM Payroll Systems (3 credits)
In this class the student will learn to identify the needed components of a payroll system for their business, process an initial payroll and create monthly, quarterly and yearly reports. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2135 SBM Payroll Reports (2 credits)
In this class the student will learn to use the appropriate documents for reporting employee earnings to the state and federal governments on a monthly, quarterly and yearly basis. (Prerequisites: SBMT 2134)

SBMT2136 SBM Year End Closing (1 credits)
In this class the student will learn the process of closing expense and revenue accounts and making adjusting entries for the year-end. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2240 SBM Organizational Structure (1 credits)
In this class the student will learn about the various organizational structures that a small business may take and their strengths and weaknesses. (Prerequisites: SBMT1230)

SBMT2241 SBM Financial & Tax Planning (2 credits)
In this class the student will begin the process of financial and tax planning for the company. (Prerequisites: SBMT 1230)

SBMT2242 SBM Risk Management (1 credits)
In this class the student will learn various techniques for identifying and minimizing risk for their business. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2243 SBM Cost Analysis (2 credits)
In this class the student will learn to apply direct materials, direct labor and other expenses associated with a job. They will create appropriate records and reports. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2244 SBM Pro-Forma Financial Statements (2 credits)
In this class the student will learn how to construct pro-forma income and balance sheet statements and financial forecasts. (Prerequisites: SBMT 1230)

SBMT2265 Small Business Recordkeeping Applications IV (2 credits)
This course covers the analysis of, and the procedures in, making adjusting entries for accounts receivable, accounts payable, general journal and general ledgers. (Prerequisities: SBMT1160, 1265, 1266)

SBMT2265 Small Business Recordkeeping Applications IV (2 credits)
This course covers the analysis of, and the procedures in, making adjusting entries for accounts receivable, accounts payable, general journal and general ledgers. (Prerequisities: SBMT1160, 1265, 1266)

SBMT2330 SBM Sales & Marketing Analysis (2 credits)
In this class the student will conduct a sales audit of the business and complete a sales and marketing analysis report based on customer and product information. (Prerequisites: SBMT 1310)

SBMT2331 SBM Marketing Research (1 credits)
In this class the student will learn how to conduct some primary and secondary market research as it relates to their business. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2332 SBM e-Business Sales (2 credits)
In this class the student will examine business to customer sales transactions and applications for their business. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2333 SBM Customer Information Systems (1 credits)
In this class the student will learn the process of collecting and compiling customer information for increased sales opportunities and improved customer service. (Prerequisities: SBMT 1310)

SBMT2334 SBM Customer Service (2 credits)
This class is designed to give additional skills to the business owner or manager that improve the customer service offered by the business. The class will focus on creating a customer service plan, training staff to deal with customer service issues, and identifying management procedures to maintain and improve customer service.

SBMT2420 SBM Supervisory Skills 1 (2 credits)
In this class the student will learn various strategies for dealing with different behavioral types in individuals and strategies for building work teams. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2421 SBM Supervisory Skills 2 (2 credits)
In this class the student will study employee communication skills and dealing with diversity in the workplace. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2422 SBM Employee Compensation (2 credits)
In this class the student will identify employee compensation and benefit options for their business and government rules and regulations regarding compensation for employees. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2531 SBM Business Communications (1 credits)
In this class the student will practice their speaking and writing to improve their communication skills. They will also learn about the different styles of communication and how to address each. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2532 SBM Business Math (1 credits)
In this class the student will learn math fundamentals as they apply to small businesses. This will include loan and depreciation schedules as well as the time value of money. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2533 SBM Time Management Skills (1 credits)
In this class the student will study time management skills as applied to a small business management position. (Prerequisite: None)

SBMT2534 SBM Stress Management Skills (1 credits)
In this class the student will study stress management skills as applied to a small business management position. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2610 SBM Computerization-Accounting (3 credits)
In this class the student will begin the process of computerizing the accounting records of their business. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2611 SBM Computerization-Sales & Marketing (3 credits)
In this class the student will begin the process of computerizing the sales and marketing records of customers and the business. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2612 SBM Computerization-Human Resources (3 credits)
In this class the student will begin the process of computerizing the human resource records of the employees and the business. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2700 SBM Going Into Business (3 credits)
In this class the student will examine the process of starting a business. It will include business organization, hiring of employees, marketing and basic record keeping. (Prerequisites: None)

SBMT2900 SBM Special Projects (1 - 3 credits)
Topics and projects will be assigned by the instructor. (Prerequisites: None)

SGAG - Agri-Business

SGAG1000 Ag Orientation (1 credits)
Students will become oriented to the careers in agriculture related to the specific filed they plan to enter. Completion of interviews of industry professionals will be required and students will need to write a career plan relating to the path they have been oriented. (Prerequisite: None)

SHA - Energy Technical Specialist

SHA1600 Introduction to Industrial Safety & Health (Hibbing CC) (2 credits)
This course is offered through Hibbing Community College. Please refer to the course description located at the HCC website: www.hibbing.edu

SOC - Sociology

SOC101 Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
The world is a far more diverse place than you might think! This course is a broad survey of sociology and its practical uses for all of us. In this course, students are introduced to a variety of topics, emphasizing breadth rather than depth. After learning about the basic theories and methods of sociology, students will cover topics such as race, gender, education, religion, social class, work, family, the environment, government and politics, organizations and bureaucracy, and other topics. Students will learn about the nature of all of these areas and their effects on individuals and their broader implications for society. In the end, students will leave with a far greater understanding of how society is organized and what that means for where we have been, where we are, and where we are going as a people. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 5 & 8: History and Social Sciences, Global Perspective)

SOC106 Introduction to Criminal Justice (4 credits)
This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system in the United States, including the foundations, role, structure, and realities of the police, courts, and corrections. Sociological perspectives are applied to an analysis of crime and victimization, ethics, and the concept of justice. Students will also learn about current issues facing the criminal justice system. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOC110 Social Problems (3 credits)
This course is a survey of the sociology of a selected set of social problems in the U.S. and globally, e.g. crime and violence, poverty, unemployment, war and terrorism, environmental degradation, and population growth. The social-structural and cultural sources of these problems are critically analyzed, and structural and cultural solutions following from such analyses are examined. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Human Diversity)

SOC201 Marriage and Family (3 credits)
The Sociology of Marriage and Family will help students understand this dynamic institution as an important variable in our contemporary society. Students will be exposed to the various sociological perspectives, methods of study, and core concepts related to the institution of Marriage and Family. Simultaneously, students will also learn how the diverse institution of Marriage and Family continues to affect and inform the society at the local, national and global level. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Human Diversity)

SOC205 Special Topics in Sociology: (3 credits)
Special Topics in Sociology is a course that is used to cover a specific sociological area that is not otherwise covered by the other sociology courses offered. This course will explore the basic principles, theories, methodologies, and contemporary research and issues of the topic indicated in the course title on the registration page. Students should expect this course to be a survey of topics in the given sociological sub-discipline. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOC206 Juvenile Delinquency (3 credits)
This course will provide a survey of sociological perspectives on juvenile delinquency. Juvenile delinquency has only existed as a distinct subdiscipline of criminology for about 100 years. The change in ideas reflects the unique challenges in dealing with delinquents: children commit different kinds of crimes in different ways, their motivations differ from adults, and the effective correction of these behaviors is distinct and separate from adult corrections. This course will survey sociological perspectives of these issues, how delinquents develop, how to identify delinquents and target them for interventions, as well as various "best practices" when it comes to dealing with delinquents. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOC210 Social Stratification - Who Gets What and Why? (3 credits)
This course examines the central question of "who gets what and why?" in the contemporary world. In answering this question, the course focuses on the social arrangements of social stratification and inequality and their effects on society and individual lives. It critically examines the historical, theoretical, and empirical foundations, manifestations, and maintenance of social class difference, power and conflict. The course primarily examines the United States, but, because the U.S. is not isolated from world affairs, including global economic affairs, it will necessarily also tend to more global concerns. While cultivating a critical understanding of the nature of social stratification and inequalities, the course will explore alternatives and possibilities for a more equitable and humane society with both individual and structural levels of analysis. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Global Perspective)

SOC251 Criminology and Criminal Behavior (4 credits)
This course is designed to develop an understanding of criminally deviant behavior and how it is studied within the discipline of sociology. Students will study criminological theories, theories of causation of crime, as well as the current "trends" in crime coupled with an exhaustive profile of criminals engaging in a given area of crime. Topics of study include the pathology of murder and violent crime, rape, burglary, larceny, white collar crimes such as embezzlement, corporate crime, cybercrime, organized crime, street gangs, and other areas. Public policy implications and considerations from the local to national levels will be examined. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOC259 Drugs and Society (3 credits)
This course focuses on drug use and abuse as a social rather than as a medical or psychopathological phenomenon. Specifically, the course deals with the history of drug use and regulatory attempts in the United States and around the world; the relationship between drug use and race/social class; pharmacology and use patterns related to specific drugs; perspectives on the causes of drug abuse; AIDS prevention and harm reduction interventions; drug-using subcultures; drug policy, drug dealing and street gangs, drug legislation, and drug enforcement; and the promotion and condemnation of drug activities in the mass media. Each week, students can expect to discuss one of these issues and also view an episode of a program from the popular media used as a basis for discussion. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOLA - Somali

SOLA100 Somali Language I (4 credits)
This course provides an introduction to Somali language and culture. Communication skills include: speaking, listening, reading & writing. Sensitivity to cultural differences is emphasized. Simple texts dealing with cultural topics are used to develop skill in speaking. The four skills - speaking, comprehending, reading, and writing - are developed simultaneously. This course is designed for students with very little or no previous experience with the Somali language. (Prerequisite: None) (MnTC Goal 8 Global Perspectives)

SOLA102 Somali Language II (4 credits)
This course is a continuation of SOLA 100 with increased emphasis of Somali culture and language skills including speaking, listening, reading articles and elementary creative writing, as well as awareness of sensitivity to cultural. This course is interactive and taught in Somali. This course use text books and modern media including audio, video recordings, information printed on websites and news in Somali from across world. (Prerequisite: SOLA 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 8: Global Perspective)

SOWK - Social Work

SOWK100 Introduction to Social Work (3 credits)
This course provides students with an introduction to the profession of social work using a generalist model to practice in a diverse society. Students will learn about the history of the profession, values and ethics, roles and tasks, and theories required for social work practice along with various fields of practice. Students will experience group work learning to develop critical thinking skills and professional communication. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher AND completion of either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 or ENGL 100 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MnTC Goal Areas: None)

SOWK105 Social Welfare Services (3 credits)
This course will discuss the history of social welfare as an institution. Various social problems will be examined and discussed in terms of at-risk populations, societal norms and values, and how policy is developed to address these problems. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

SOWK110 Community Social Service Projects (3 credits)
This course is a group-based, experiential learning course that will help students learn problem solving and critical thinking skills to help a target population. Students will learn how to work with action and target groups to assess a social issue, then research, design, implement, and evaluate a community social service project to help address a need that arose from that social issue. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher AND completion of either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

SOWK115 Social Welfare Services (4 credits)
This course will discuss the history of social welfare as an institution. Various social problems will be examined and discussed in terms of at-risk populations, societal norms and values, and how policy is developed to address these problems. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100) (MnTC Goal Areas: 5, 7)

SPAN - Spanish

SPAN105 Elementary Spanish I (4 credits)
Students will be introduced to Spanish as a foreign language. The primary goal of the course is to acquire communicative competence in Spanish in regards to listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language learning is a gradual process, in which one skill leads to the next, building the basis for more advanced skills. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 8: Global Perspective)

SPAN110 Elementary Spanish II (4 credits)
The primary goal of the course is to refine the basic communication skills acquired in Elementary Spanish I emphasizing reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will work to improve speaking and listening skills to communicate in a number of more complicated situations in the target language as a way to build a basis for more advanced skills. In addition, students will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge about the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. (Prerequisites: SPAN 105 with a grade of C or higher or a passing grade in the placement exam given on the first day of class)(MNTC 8: Global Perspective)

SPAN205 Intermediate Spanish (4 credits)
The primary goal of the course is to refine the communication skills acquired in Elementary Spanish II emphasizing reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will work to improve speaking and listening skills to communicate in more complicated and specific situations in the target language and build a base of intermediate language skills. In addition, students will continue to expand their knowledge about the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. (Prerequisites: SPAN 110 with a grade of C or higher or a passing grade in the placement exam given on the first day of class) (MNTC 8: Global Perspective)

SWPR - Agri-Business

SWPR1000 Introduction to U. S. Pork Production (2 credits)
This course will provide an overview and introduction to the current U.S. Pork Industry. The course will cover industry trends and statistics, production systems, ethical production principles, Good Production Practices (GPP), and support systems. The course will also focus on health concerns, alternative production systems, production records and financial analysis. Additionally, a discussion on meat quality and consumer issues related to food safety and animal welfare will be addressed. Current industry issues related to the Show and Seed Stock businesses will be covered as well. (Prerequisites None)

SWPR1050 Swine Artificial Insemination (1 credits)
This course is designed to teach the fundamental principles of livestock genetics in a practical manner. This course covers the study of the equipment necessary for artificial insemination in swine. Principles involved in heat detection, boar training, semen collection, semen evaluation, commercial semen, insemination, recordkeeping, and clean up procedures will all be addressed in this course. (Prerequisite: None)

SWPR1200 Swine Breeding Stock Management (3 credits)
This course will provide a comprehensive study of the swine breeding herd. It will focus on the technical aspects of the breeding, gestation, and farrowing departments in a swine operation. Topics include the conditioning, care and management of gilts, sows and boars, breeding schedules, breeding methods, stock replacement, herd integration, replacement strategies, gestation management, Lactation management, reproductive health considerations, and care of piglets prior to weaning. (Prerequisite: None)

SWPR1300 Nursery Finish Management (3 credits)
This course covers the requirements of the growing and finishing phases of swine to maximize production and efficiency. An overview of the technical and theoretical aspects of nursery, grower and finishing stages will be covered in this course. Production efficiency will be emphasized, as well as the humane treatment of animals. The discussion of social stress, nutritional stress and housing requirements will be included as well. The course will also cover scheduling of facilities, animal marketing, environmental considerations, animal observations and proper animal husbandry skills. (Prerequisites: None)

SWPR1500 Swine Diseases (2 credits)
This course is a review of all common swine diseases in relation to their economic significance, symptoms, transmission, prevention, and treatment. This course will consist primarily of disease prevention and the means required to promote productive livestock production. Some time will be spent on the analyzing of specific diseases, describing symptoms and treatment. Artificial immunization and sanitation and how they can be used for specific diseases will be covered. (Prerequisites: None)

SWPR2000 Swine Records and Analysis (3 credits)
This course covers recordkeeping systems for wide range of swine enterprises with an emphasis on interpretation, terms, and accuracy factors. Swine record use and analysis to maintain efficient productivity in all aspects of the swine enterprise is stressed. Computerized record systems are compared and students have an opportunity to utilize PigChamp or Pigcare record information, as well as other computerized records in swine production systems. Students will explain industry benchmarks and factors that impact obtaining business production goals. (Prerequisites: None)

THTR - Theater

THTR100 Introduction to Theater (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the study of theater as a performance art rather than as literature. Course content focuses primarily on the collaboration between the creative, artistic, and technical elements in a dramatic production. The evolution of theater from ancient to modern times is also considered. Class activities include lecture/discussions, attendance at live performances, and guided tours of local theater plants. Assignments take the form of reading, written critical evaluations of live and recorded performances, quizzes, and student presentations. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

THTR110 Introduction to Acting I (3 credits)
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of acting and making the student a more informed observer of acting for performance on the stage. This will be accomplished through instruction and practice of acting methodologies and developing the student's inner resources of voice, body, and imagination. The class will explore basic theories of acting, as well as participate in physical and vocal routines, improvisation, and individual and group exercise. The course will also introduce the student to the fundamental rehearsal process culminating in the performances of selected scenes. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

VITI - Viticulture

VITI1111 Introduction to Viticulture and Vineyard (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to current practices for establishing a commercial vineyard and maintaining its health and productivity once established. Topics covered include varietal selection, site preparation, equipment, site selection, first season establishment, vine growth development and training, trellis systems, vine propagation, weed control and vine disease control. Field practicum sessions consisting of 32 hours of hands-on experience will be scheduled in area vineyards. (Prerequisites: None)

VITI1112 Botanical Viticulture (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the plant kingdom and to examine grapevine form and function from a botanical perspective. Topics to be covered include the specific characteristics of plants that distinguish them from other forms of life, divisions within the plant kingdom with representative members of each, and plant classification. Plant cells, tissues, life cycles, structures and functions, especially as applied to grapevines will also be discussed, along with various aspects of plant and grapevine physiology, such as photosynthesis, respiration, nutrition, cold acclimation and hardiness, and dormancy. (Prerequisite: None)

VITI1113 Winter Viticulture Technology (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide students initiated in the field of viticulture practical experience in winter vineyard operations. Students are required to partner with an approved vineyard to participate in the required field experience portion of the course which will serve as work experience for those seeking employment in commercial viticulture. (Prerequisites: VITI 1111-- or instructor permission)

VITI1114 Spring Viticulture Technology (2 credits)
This course is designed to provide students initiated in the field of viticulture practical experience in spring vineyard operations. Students are required to partner with an approved vineyard to participate in the required field experience portion of the course which will serve as work experience for those seeking employment in commercial viticulture. (Prerequisites: VITI 1111 or instructor permission).

VITI1115 Summer/Fall Viticulture Technology (2 credits)
Coursework will focus on fundamental viticulture issues related to the grape maturation process. Students will be introduced to the knowledge and practical skills required to control and monitor grape berry growth and development as it relates to successful commercial production of both table and wine grapes adapted to the continental climate of the Mid-Western United States.Students are required to partner with an approved vineyard to participate in a field practicum portion of the course, which will provide hands-on work experience for those seeking employment in the field of commercial viticulture. (Prerequisite: VITI 1111 or instructor permission).

VITI1190 Viticulture Safety (1 credits)
This course is an introduction to the hazards and safety issues in grape-growing.This course will include an overview of general agricultural safety and health,ergonomics, personal protective equipment, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules and regulations, and other issues unique to viticulture. (Prerequisites: None)

VITI1211 Integrated Pest Management (2 credits)
Effective grape production depends on the grower developing a system of grape management that is appropriate for each vineyard. Decisions need to be made for how to manage all of the normal cultural practices such as planting, fertility, harvesting, and pruning as well as managing the insect, disease, and weed problems that occur either regularly or sporadically. The information in this course will address management issues related to common, expected pest problems as well as the occasional appearance of minor pest problems. (Prerequisites: None)

VITI1213 Regional Vineyard Management (2 credits)
This course is a general survey of vineyard management in the general wine growing regions in the Continental United States. The course covers management of the mature vineyard from region to region and builds on the topics covered prerequisite courses. (Prerequisites: VITI 1111 and one of the following VITI 1113, VITI 1114, VITI 1115)

VITI1293 Soils for Viticulture (3 credits)
The course will explore soil properties and behavior and their influence on vine growth and wine grape characteristics. The course focuses not only on growth and production, but on the long-term effects of viticulture on soil quality and the wider environment. Upon completion of the course students will be able to select sites for a new vineyard, and help manage soils in existing vineyards. (Prerequisites: None)

WELD - Welding

WELD1005 Blueprint Reading (1 credits)
This course provides an understanding of blueprints used within welding technology settings. Skills for reading, understanding, and interpreting welding symbols will be developed. (Prerequisites: None)

WELD1007 Blueprint Reading for Welding (2 credits)
This course will expand on basic blueprint reading by utilizing skills and knowledge about symbols, charts, and measurements to work more closely with blueprints specific to Welding. (Prerequisite: None)

WELD1010 OSHA 10 Hour and Welding Safety (1 credits)
This course is intended to provide entry level general industry workers information about their rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint as well as how to identify, abate, avoid, and prevent job related hazards on a job site. The training covers a variety of general industry safety and health hazards which a worker may encounter. An emphasis is placed on safety issues that exist in the welding environment. (Prerequisite: None)

WELD1011 Welding Safety (1 credits)
Topics in this course include the basics of welding safety including proper equipment use and maintenance, machine guarding, bloodborne pathogens, safety and health programs, and overall welding safety. (Prerequisite: None)

WELD1020 Introduction to Stick Welding (1 credits)
This course will cover shielded metal arc welding on carbon steel in various positions. (Prerequisite: None)

WELD1025 Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) (1 credits)
This course will provide an introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) on carbon steel in various positions along with an introduction to welding safety, welding, and electrode compatability. Components of SMAW will be introduced, including selection of materials and steps necessary to complete tasks. Basic information about duty cycle, cable sizing, arc blow, and electrodes will also be presented. (Prerequisite: None)

WELD1026 Shield Metal ARC Welding II (1 credits)
This course will expand on information introduced in SMAW I and will provide more practice time with electrodes: types, selection, discussion of power sources. Types of SMAW will be used in various ways, including selection of materials and steps necessary to complete tasks. Duty cycle, cable sizing, arc blow are expanded upon and advantages, limitations, vertical-up and vertical down are explored. Additionally, this course will prepare for AWS D 1.1 Certification. (Prerequisites: WELD 1025)

WELD1030 Introduction to MIG Welding (1 credits)
This course will cover gas metal arc welding process using short circuit transfer on carbon steel in various positions. (Prerequisite: None)

WELD1035 Introduction to Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) (2 credits)
The course will cover gas metal arc welding process using short circuit and spray methods on carbon steel. (Prerequisites: None)

WELD1036 Gas Metal Arc Welding II (1 credits)
This course will reinforce concepts introduced in GMAW I, including circuits, spray arcs, and effects of shielding gasses. More practice time will be dedicated to mastery of gas metal arc welding. Additionally, this course will prepare for American Welding Society D 1.1 certification. (Prerequisites: WELD 1035)

WELD1045 Introduction to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (3 credits)
This course is designed to instruct welders in welding safety and the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW-TIG). The student will learn fundamentals of GTAW (TIG) for steel, stainless steel and aluminum. Welding procedures are taught on aluminum, carbon and stainless steels. The training covers edge, corner, lap, and fillet welds in all positions. Welding is limited to regular thin flat material, which does not include thick plate, pipe or other irregular shapes. (Prerequisites: None)

WELD1055 Cutting and Brazing (3 credits)
An introduction to oxy-fuel welding and cutting, safety, setup and maintenance of oxy-fuel welding, and cutting equipment and supplies. The course will demonstrate oxy-fuel welding and cutting safety procedures; identify and classify fuels and filler metals; perform entry-level oxy-fuel welding and cutting operations and select proper equipment and materials. A study of all position welding on ferrous and nonferrous metals using oxy-fuel welding process, including welding and cutting, brazing, and soldering operations. (Prerequisite: None)

WELD1065 Metallurgy (1 credits)
Students will learn how metal discoveries and uses have impacted human history. The course will also include an introduction to the internal structure of metals, how alloys are made, and how metals are affected in the welding process. (Prerequisite: None)

WELD1075 Advanced Welding Lab (4 credits)
Advanced welding lab is a course designed to allow students to utilize all of their skills with capstone project based assignments that prepares students to get their American Welding Society credentials. Students can also focus on a particular skills of choice. (Corequisite: WELD 1011)

WELD1085 Welding Capstone (2 credits)
This course is an opportunity to put welding skills to work. The Capstone will build on what was learned in the certificate program. Students keep current with welding skill through designing a project and welding the final project. The Welding Capstone may also include an internship. A learning contract will be developed between the student, college, and worksite to identify the types of specific skills covered through this experiential learning opportunity. Students will gain industry workplace experience while practicing the knowledge and skills learned in class. (Prerequisite: Instructor permission required)

WELD1101 Welding Fundamentals (2 credits)
This course includes introduction and skill development in Oxy/Fuel welding, cutting, brazing, and torch cutting, Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), metal preparation and safe operation of machines involved in the above applications. (Prerequisites: None)