60 Credits    NA 3805,  Academic Catalog 2020-2021

Degree Description

The Associate in Arts (AA) degree is awarded for successful completion of a 60 semester credit program in Arts and Sciences and is intended primarily for students who plan to transfer to another college or university to complete a bachelor’s degree.  Although no specific major is listed in conjunction with this degree, students may choose to concentrate in a particular field of study in preparation for a planned major or professional emphasis at a four-year college or university.  An AA degree must include the entire 40-credit Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MNTC) specified below, which, pursuant to Minnesota statute, must transfer to any institution in the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System or to the University of Minnesota.  Students are strongly encouraged to develop an educational plan with their academic advisor and the Transfer Specialist to assure that AA degree and pre-major requirements are fulfilled.

General Requirements

Completing the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) requirement alone satisfies the lower division general education requirement at all Minnesota two and four-year public colleges and universities.

To complete the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum students must:

  1. Complete all ten goals.
  2. Complete at least 40 college-level credits from courses listed within the ten goal areas MnTC.
  3. Earn a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher and a 67% completion rate in coursework completed at South Central College.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE / GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:

Complete a total of 60 semester credits numbered 100 and above (college level) as described below:

  1. Complete the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC)
  2. Complete the FYE 100 First Year Experience course (1 credit) within the first three semesters (Fall, Spring, Summer) of attendance at South Central College. This course is required for all A.A. students unless the student has:
    • Completed 24 college level credits at another institution or in another SCC program before transferring to the AA program
    • Taken a First Year Experience course at another accredited college
  3. Complete the Capstone course after the completion of at least 40 credits (1 credit)
  4. Complete electives to meet 60 semester credits (Up to 16 credits can be from technical/career courses)
  5. Complete at least one (1) credit in a health and wellness course
  6. Earn a cumulative GPA of 2.0 and a 67% completion rate
  7. Earn a GPA of 2.0 or higher in MnTC coursework.

NOTE: Credits from repeated courses count only once

Campuses: Faribault and North Mankato
Program Start Dates: Fall and Spring Semester

The course requirements listed below are specific to the current school year (noted above). If you need to view the program from previous years view our Catalog Archive.

Goal Area 1 - Oral and Written Communication

The following courses apply to MNTC Goal 1. To complete the goal, students must complete ENGL 100 and one COMM course from COMM 100, 110, 120 or 140.

PART A

ENGL100 Composition (4 Credits)

Composition is concerned with developing, through theory and practice, the ability to communicate in written form for personal and professional reasons. Students will develop writing skills, analytic skills, and critical thinking skills. Students will complete readings, papers, grammar exercises, and in-class activities. Students will complete research and write a research paper. Students will learn methods of writing informatively and persuasively. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher AND completion of either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 1: Communication)

 
PART B

COMM100 Introduction to Human Communication (3 Credits)

This course is an introductory survey course of the communication discipline. It provides a sample of topics from interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, public speaking, small group communication, media, organizational communication, and interviewing. This course will offer students knowledge about communication and offer the opportunity to improve their skills. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 1: Communication)

OR

COMM110 Public Speaking (3 Credits)

Learners in this class develop (or improve) skills in creating, organizing, supporting, and delivering both informative and persuasive messages to peer audiences. Through this course, students will develop arguments and practice academic research skills in order to adequately support their messages and develop credibility and professionalism. Learners will practice critical thinking and listening skills, support fellow students while delivering impromptu and extemporaneous speeches, and provide peer feedback to ideas and speech development. This course stresses building confidence as public communicators so students may speak effectively at work, in their communities, and as citizens in a democracy. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher) (MNTC: Goal areas 1 and 9).

OR

COMM120 Small Group Communication (3 Credits)

This course helps students develop or improve their participation in small groups and teams using effective communication and critical thinking. Content of the course includes both knowledge and skills components. Students can develop an understanding of communication and group theory while applying their knowledge in small group discussions, cooperative projects, and other activities. The course curriculum emphasizes reflection and growth. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC: Goals 1 and 2).

OR

COMM140 Interpersonal Communication (3 Credits)

In this class, participants will examine key components of interpersonal communication theory, identify the interpersonal communication skills necessary for healthy relationships, assess their own interpersonal communication effectiveness, and practice and hone interpersonal communication skills necessary for healthy home and work relationships. This course will also address relevant issues of social interaction, including how human diversity/culture (age, race, gender, etc.) affects our interpersonal communication. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 1: Communication)


Goal Area 2 - Critical Thinking

The following courses apply to MNTC Goal 2. Complete all 9 other MNTC goal areas OR select one course.

CHEM101 The Chemistry of Everything (3 Credits)

A chemistry course for non-science major which explores the world from a chemical perspective. This course is designed to increase students' scientific literacy. A two-hour lab is included. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 2, 3: Critical Thinking, Natural Sciences)

CHEM110 Chemistry for the Health Sciences (4 Credits)

Key concepts of general, organic, and biological chemistry are introduced in an integrated approach with applications from the medical fields. The course is designed to prepare students for Anatomy, Physiology, and Microbiology or to be utilized as a general Arts and Sciences course. Limited mathematical approach; this course does not meet the requirements of a prerequisite for CHEM 120. Lecture and a 2-hour lab are included. (Prerequisite: [Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher] AND [ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher] AND [have a Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or (Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher and Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher) or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher or MCA Math score of 1158 or higher.] (MNTC 2, 3: Critical Thinking, Natural Sciences)

COMM120 Small Group Communication (3 Credits)

This course helps students develop or improve their participation in small groups and teams using effective communication and critical thinking. Content of the course includes both knowledge and skills components. Students can develop an understanding of communication and group theory while applying their knowledge in small group discussions, cooperative projects, and other activities. The course curriculum emphasizes reflection and growth. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC: Goals 1 and 2).

COMM150 Introduction to Mass Communication (4 Credits)

Introduction to Mass Communication explores the structures, functions, responsibilities, and effects of the media in contemporary society. Students will gain an understanding of the social, economic, and intellectual forces that help shape the media. The course presents concise historical perspectives of each major type of mass media. However, the primary focus is on the issues surrounding contemporary mass media with a strong emphasis on media literacy and ethical responsibility. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 2, 9: Critical Thinking, Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

CRTK100 Critical Thinking (3 Credits)

This course helps students acquire and develop critical thinking skills. Focused on the practical application of the principles of good reasoning, it encourages them to cultivate cognitive virtues such as consistency, self-awareness, open-mindedness, fairness, and intellectual humility. Students will be taught how to: recognize (and make) good arguments, identify (and avoid) logical fallacies and cognitive biases, articulate ideas in a clear and precise way, understand the significance and limits of the scientific method, and critically evaluate sources in the media. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC: 2 Critical Thinking)

HUM 100 Critical Thinking (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the importance of critical thinking in our culture today. Students will be provided with methods of critical thinking as well as relevant topics on which to practice their skills. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 2: Critical Thinking)

PHIL130 Logic (4 Credits)

In this course we will explore some of the methods and principles that distinguish logically correct from incorrect reasoning. We will also learn to use formal techniques to evaluate the cogency of everyday argumentation. Most of the semester will be spent becoming familiar with a variety of elementary logical techniques and rules: distinguishing inductive from deductive arguments, valid from invalid arguments, mastering the formal rules of inference, truth tables and the propositional logic. Some find this material fascinating in its own right. Others value logic for the light it casts on everyday argumentation, and for its uses in philosophy, mathematics, and computing. Logical skills are not only an important component of aptitude tests such as the GRE and LSAT, but are also valuable in almost any course or job that involves using analytical techniques. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 2, 4: Critical Thinking, Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

PHIL150 Medical Ethics (3 Credits)

This course examines the moral problems confronting medical providers and surveys the broader field of bioethics. After providing a general introduction to ethical concepts and theories, it focuses on specific issues relating to the American health care system, including access to care, inequality, obesity, reproductive rights, end-of-life care, disability, organ transplantation, and alternative medicine. Emphasis is placed on practical application of moral principles and critical analysis of case studies. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 2, 9)

PHIL215 Business Ethics (3 Credits)

The intent of this course is to show that the world of business traffics in the world of ethics. Business is not a neutral domain where one may do as one pleases. For instance, there is the question of what sorts of obligations businesses have toward their employees. Do businesses have a positive moral duty to promote social goods? Do they have a primary obligation or do their moral responsibilities comprise a set of different and equally important obligations? We will examine several views of the moral relation between businesses and others including the stockholder theory and the stakeholder theory. The goals of this course are to become acquainted with the architecture of morality, master the various moral theories and their unique implications for business, and to gain facility sliding between talk of each and applying each in various business contexts. We will examine various moral theories like utilitarianism and deontological type theories and then examine them in the context of applied business ethical issues. We will also look at broader issues about the nature of a just society and just economy in which the business is to function. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 2, 9: Critical Thinking, Ethical & Civil Responsibility)

MASS110 Introduction to Mass Communication (4 Credits)

This course explores the structures, functions, responsibilities, and effects of the media in contemporary society. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 2, 9: Critical Thinking, Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

CAP 250 Associate of Arts Capstone Class (1 Credit)

This course should be taken by students seeking the Associates of Arts degree during their final semester at SCC. It assesses fulfillment of the program's Learning Outcomes (Communication, Critical Thinking, Research Proficiency, Global Perspective and Social Responsibility), and allows students to demonstrate their readiness to take junior-level classes at a four-year institution. (Prerequisite: Unless instructor grants special permission, students must be in their last semester of the Associate in Arts program at SCC) (MNTC 2: Critical Thinking)

Goal Area 3 - Natural Sciences

The following courses apply to MNTC Goal 3. To compelte the goal, students must select at least two courses from two different disciplines.

BIOL100 Introduction to Biology (4 Credits)

Introduction to Biology familiarizes students with fundamental biological principles and processes occurring within our natural world. This course engages students in the methodology and practice of scientific investigation, and emphasizes molecular and cellular processes, systems of the human body, and human impact on the environment. Discussions of organisms are framed by the sciences of ecology and evolution with a focus on the relationship between biological structure and function. Lecture and a 2 hour lab are included. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL101 Introduction to Ecology (4 Credits)

Introduction to Ecology introduces the student to fundamental principles of ecology while focusing on interactions occurring at all of its levels. Students will become familiar with interrelationships between biotic and abiotic components of the natural world, investigate population, community, and ecosystem structures and dynamics, and gain knowledge of human impact on the environment. Lecture and a 3 hour lab are included. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3, 10: Natural Sciences, People and the Environment)

BIOL106 Introduction to Cell Biology (3 Credits)

This is an introductory cell biology course dealing with: the cell structure and organelles; basic chemistry and biochemical molecules; cell transport and energy concepts; cellular respiration; cell reproduction; patterns of inheritance; structure and function of DNA; how genes are controlled; DNA technology. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL110 Biology of Disease (3 Credits)

This course is a survey of human disease including physiological and infectious diseases. Possible topics include infectious diseases, cancer, heart disease, disorders of the immune system, diabetes, etc. Prevention of disease through control of risk factors and early detection will be covered. Diagnosis and treatment will also be addressed. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL115 General Biology I (4 Credits)

This course covers biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. It serves as an introduction to macromolecules and metabolism, cell biology, Mendelian genetics, and gene expression. This course involves a weekly three hour lab. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher AND Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 237 or Classic Accuplacer College Level Math score of 50 or higher or either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC Area 3)

BIOL116 General Biology II (4 Credits)

This course covers biology at the organismal, population and system level. It will emphasize organismal diversity, population and community ecology and ecosystems. Students will gain an understanding of how evolutionary advances have occurred among populations due to natural selection. This course involves a weekly three hour lab. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer score of 250 or above, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a C (2.0) or higher or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher AND a Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 237 or higher or Classic Accuplacer College Level Math score of 50 or higher, or either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC area 3)

BIOL152 Tropical Rain Forest Ecology (4 Credits)

Tropical Rain Forest Ecology introduces students to fundamental ecological concepts, processes and dynamics within the tropical rain forest biome. Discussions of flora and fauna will be framed within the context of evolution with an emphasis on adaptations. A special focus will be made on the rain forests and culture of Costa Rica and the Galapagos Islands. This course includes a one-week study abroad to Costa Rica or the Galapagos Islands. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3, 10: Natural Sciences, People and the Environment)

BIOL162 Human Biology (4 Credits)

This one-semester course is an introduction to the biology of the human body. Basic form and function of the body systems and their interactions will be emphasized. Other topics include: terminology, basic chemistry, cell biology genetics, molecular biology and nutrition as it relates to the human body. This course contains a laboratory portion. (Minnesota Transfer Curriculum goal area 3) (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL220 Human Anatomy (4 Credits)

This course takes an in-depth look at the anatomy of the human body systems. The course emphasizes structure and anatomical function at the cellular, tissue, organ and systemic level. Dysfunctions are included but the body in homeostasis is emphasized. This course includes a weekly three hour lab. Some labs include dissection. (Prerequisite: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading Comprehension score of 78 or higher or completion of either READ0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C or better or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher, or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Area 3)

BIOL225 Anatomy and Physiology I (4 Credits)

Anatomy and Physiology I is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body under normal and abnormal conditions. It is the first in a two course series. It will cover tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, and muscular systems, articulations, nervous tissue, spinal cord and nerves, brain and cranial nerves, anatomy of the heart, blood vessels and circulation and the lymphatic structures. It will also cover cellular biology, cellular transport, cell respiration, cell reproduction and basic review of biochemistry as it relates to the human body. This course contains a laboratory component which includes dissection. For Biology majors, please see BIOL 220 Anatomy and BIOL 230 Physiology. (Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or CHEM 110, and must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL230 Human Physiology (4 Credits)

This course provides an in-depth study of the functioning of most body systems, including muscle, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and endocrine systems at both the cellular and systemic level. An emphasis is placed on normal physiology, but dysfunction will also be discussed. This course contains a weekly 3 hour laboratory component. (Prerequisites: BIOL 220 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 108, CHEM 110 or CHEM 120 with a grade of C or better) (MNTC Goal Area 3)

BIOL235 Anatomy and Physiology II (4 Credits)

Anatomy and Physiology II is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body under normal and abnormal conditions. It is the second in a two course series. It will cover the autonomic, endocrine, immune, respiratory, digestive urinary and reproductive systems. It will also cover fluid electrolyte, acid-base balance, blood, blood pressure regulation and functional characteristics of the heart, special senses, development and inheritance. This course also has a lab component in which students will perform hands on activities to reinforce some of the material taught in lecture. For Biology majors, please see BIOL 220 Anatomy and BIOL 230 Physiology. (Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 225 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL240 Pathophysiology (3 Credits)

This course provides an in-depth study of the chemical, biological and psychological process involved with alterations of health, using systemic and non-systemic approaches. Besides the two hour lecture, this course meets one additional hour to work on case studies. (Prerequisite: BIOL 230 or 235) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

BIOL270 Microbiology (4 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the general principles and methods used in the study of microorganisms. It includes a survey of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms emphasizing bacteria and viruses. Topics include microbial cell structure and function, metabolism, microbial genetics, and the role of microorganisms in disease, immunity and other selected applied areas. Laboratory techniques include isolating, culturing and identifying microorganisms. This course contains a three hour per week laboratory component. (Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in BIOL115 OR BIOL225 OR BIOL220 AND CHEM108 OR CHEM110) (MNTC Goal Area 3)

CHEM101 The Chemistry of Everything (3 Credits)

A chemistry course for non-science major which explores the world from a chemical perspective. This course is designed to increase students' scientific literacy. A two-hour lab is included. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 2, 3: Critical Thinking, Natural Sciences)

CHEM108 Introduction to Chemistry (4 Credits)

A one-semester introduction to the field of chemistry, this course is designed to allow the student to understand how chemistry relates to everyday life and to learn some of the language and concepts of chemistry related to applied health. This course uses a math-based approach. (Prerequisite: [Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher] AND [have a Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or (Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher and Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher) or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher or MCA Math score of 1158 or higher.] (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

CHEM110 Chemistry for the Health Sciences (4 Credits)

Key concepts of general, organic, and biological chemistry are introduced in an integrated approach with applications from the medical fields. The course is designed to prepare students for Anatomy, Physiology, and Microbiology or to be utilized as a general Arts and Sciences course. Limited mathematical approach; this course does not meet the requirements of a prerequisite for CHEM 120. Lecture and a 2-hour lab are included. (Prerequisite: [Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher] AND [ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher] AND [have a Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or (Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher and Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher) or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher or MCA Math score of 1158 or higher.] (MNTC 2, 3: Critical Thinking, Natural Sciences)

CHEM120 Principles of Chemistry I (5 Credits)

This course introduces the student to the basic principles of chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, solution chemistry, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, periodicity, and states of matter. Laboratory reinforces lecture concepts. (Prerequisites: Accuplacer College Level Math score of 103 or ACT Math score of 22 and CHEM 108 or MATH 120 and CHEM 108 or a grade of "C" or better in high school chemistry within the past 3 years.)

CHEM121 Principles of Chemistry II (5 Credits)

Principles of Chemistry II is the second in a series of Chemistry courses designed for students who plan to major in a scientific or health related field. Topics include kinetics, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, precipitation reactions, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Lab topics reinforce lecture concepts. (Prerequisite: CHEM 120) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

GEOG101 Introduction to Physical Geography (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to physical geography that systematically examines the spatial patterns and interrelationships among physical elements at the earth's surface. Students will study the earth's physical environment, its systems, and the physical processes that drive them through study of weather, climate, natural vegetation, soil, and landforms. However, these topics are not just discussed independently since the course concentrates on understanding the integration of these areas of the natural world. Geography focuses on human activities, and so the course will highlight some of the basic interactions between human activity and the natural environment. Current issues will be discussed and a scientific foundation provided for understanding global warming and other critical environmental issues. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3, 10: Natural Sciences, People & the Environment)

GEOG104 Introduction to Weather and Climate (3 Credits)

This course will serve as an introduction to the basic atmospheric processes described as weather. Topics including atmospheric pressure, winds, temperature patterns, humidity and precipitation, and severe weather phenomena will be examined. The spatial distribution of global climates and climate change will also be explored. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 3, 10: Natural Sciences, People & The Environment)

PHYS101 Introductory Physics (3 Credits)

A one semester course covering the basic principles of physics at a conceptual level and with a minimal amount of math. Topics generally included mechanics, simple machines, atomic structure, heat, light, and sound. Lecture and laboratory. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 250 to 300 AND Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 200 to 236 or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher AND Elementary Algebra score of 0 to 75 or completion of MATH 0075 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

PHYS211 Principles in Physics I (4 Credits)

This is the first half of a one-year sequence in physics. It covers the general background in algebra-based physics. Topics include classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, wave and sound, thermal physics. Lecture and laboratory. (Prerequisites: MATH 120 and 125, or MATH 130) (MNTC: 3, Natural Sciences)

PHYS212 Principles in Physics II (4 Credits)

This second course will provide students with the principles of algebra based physics. The course will cover basic principles of waves, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and topics in modern physics. (Prerequisite: PHYS 211) (MNTC 3: Natural Sciences)

PHYS221 General Physics I (4 Credits)

This course will provide students with the principles of calculus based physics. The course has been designed for students who plan advanced study of science and/or engineering. The course will cover basic principles of mechanics including kinematics, statics, equilibrium and dynamics of particles, work and energy, rotational motion, gravitation, and oscillation. (Prerequisites: High School Physics, PHYS 101 or 211, MATH 131 with a grade of "C" or better or by instructor permission) (MNTC: 3, Natural Sciences)

PHYS222 General Physics II (4 Credits)

This second course will provide students with the principles of calculus based physics. The course has been designed for students who plan advanced study of science and/or engineering. The course will cover basic principles of waves in light and sound; temperature, heat, and the First Law of Thermodynamics; electric charge; electric fields; Gauss' Law; electric potential; capacitance; resistance; electrical circuits; magnetic fields; induction; electromagnetic oscillations; and Maxwell's Equations. (Prerequisites: PHYS 221 with a grade of "C" or better, MATH 132 with a grade of "C" or better or by instructor permission) (MNTC: 3, Natural Sciences)

Goal Area 4 - Mathematical/Logical Reasoning

The following courses apply to MNTC Goal 4. To complete the goal, students must complete one course.

MATH115 Concepts in Math (4 Credits)

Concepts in Mathematics is a general education survey course designed to spotlight the field as an important component of our cultural heritage. It introduces a broad range of topics from classical as well as modern mathematics. The emphasis is on problem solving and developing the logical skills to successfully defend solutions, while at the same time showing how mathematics is a creative human endeavor influencing how we perceive the world. Among the major topics considered are logic, set theory, axiomatic systems, number theory, number systems, analytic geometry, algebra, combinatorics, and elementary probability. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 237 to 300; or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher AND Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher; or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher.) (MNTC 4: Math/Logical Reasoning)

MATH120 College Algebra (4 Credits)

This course is mainly concerned with functions, most of which are algebraic. It begins with general treatment of equations and inequalities and then proceeds to cover linear functions, quadratic functions, polynomial and rational functions, piecewise functions, equations involving radicals and absolute values, logarithms and exponentials, systems of equations and inequalities, permutations and combinations. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher AND Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher AND a Classic Accuplacer College Math score of 50 or higher, or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 22 or higher or MCA Math score of 1158 or higher.) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH125 Trigonometry (3 Credits)

A study of the six trigonometric functions, their inverses and their applications forms the heart of this course. First, the two common methods of angle measure are derived along with the related notions of length of arc and area of a sector. Then the trigonometric functions are defined in terms of the unit circle and their properties such as domain, range, period and amplitude are explored, along with their associated graphs. This leads to a study of identities and conditional equations. Triangle trigonometry and real-world applications follow, with an investigation of associated themes such as vectors, exponential and logarithmic functions.(Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer College Math score of 63 or higher or Completion of MATH 120 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 22 or higher.) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH130 Pre-Calculus (4 Credits)

This is an accelerated course covering many topics from both College Algebra and Trigonometry. These include functions, graphs of functions, analytic geometry of the conic sections, systems of equations and inequalities, elementary matrix operations and determinants, properties and applications of exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, complex numbers, vectors, polar coordinates and elementary combinatorics. Should not be taken for credit in addition to either MATH 120 or MATH 125. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 250 or higher or Classic Accuplacer College Math score of 86 or higher, or ACT Math score of 23 or higher.) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH131 Calculus I (4 Credits)

This course introduces the key concepts of the derivative and the integral. Beginning with the definition of limit, the notion of continuity is developed which is perhaps the most important thread running throughout the calculus. This leads naturally to the process of differentiation and then integration, concluding with the all important Fundamental Theorem of the Calculus. Along the way, applications to classical and modern science, economics, the social sciences and other fields are explored. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer AAF score of 276 or higher or Classic Accuplacer College Math score of 103 or higher or ACT Math score of 24 or higher or completion of either MATH 125 or MATH 130 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH132 Calculus II (4 Credits)

In this continuation of Calculus I, you will begin by investigating more applications of the definite integral, along with useful techniques for evaluating them. This leads in a natural way to a brief introduction to differential equations, and the evaluation of improper integrals and indeterminate forms. Next, the calculus of the transcendental functions is explored in some detail. Then the study of sequences and series is taken up, including power series and Taylor series. Important geometrical concepts such as polar coordinates, parametric equations and vectors in the plane and in space are also covered. (Prerequisites: MATH 131, with a grade of C or better) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH154 Elementary Statistics (4 Credits)

This course introduces the essential mathematical elements of statistics, applying them to a broad range of areas including business, manufacturing, economics, and the physical, biological and social sciences. Topics include descriptive measures of data, measures of central tendency, variability, standard probability distributions, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, and estimation. To put the treatment on a strong foundation, concepts of probability are developed throughout, and shown to form the unifying theme behind modern statistics. (Prerequisites: Next-Generation Accuplacer QAS score of 250 to 300; or Classic Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 56 or higher AND Classic Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76 or higher; or completion of either MATH 0085 or MATH 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or ACT Math score of 19 or higher.)

MATH231 Ordinary Differential Equations (4 Credits)

This is a traditional introductory course in ordinary differential equations for students pursuing careers in engineering, mathematics and the sciences; the focus is primarily on lower order equations. Topics include the solution of linear equations with constant coefficients, homogeneous and nonhomogeneous equations, assorted methods such as undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters and Laplace transforms. Also studied are existence and uniqueness theorems, numerical approximations, operator methods and various applications to physical phenomena. (Prerequisite: MATH 132 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH233 Multivariable Calculus (4 Credits)

Multivariable Calculus extends the notions of Calculus I and Calculus II to functions of more than one variable. Topics include such things as curves and surfaces in Euclidean n-space, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, tangent planes and differentials, double- and triple-integrals, the rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems, line integrals, surface integrals, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem and the divergence theorem. (Prerequisite: MATH 132 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

MATH240 Elementary Linear Algebra (4 Credits)

This is a first course in linear algebra for students intending to go into engineering, mathematics, the sciences, economics, statistics and other technical fields. Among the topics covered are matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear tranformations and characteristic value problems. Apart from the useful and practical topics considered, the course also serves as an introduction to the notion of mathematical proof. (Prerequisite: MATH 132 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

PHIL130 Logic (4 Credits)

In this course we will explore some of the methods and principles that distinguish logically correct from incorrect reasoning. We will also learn to use formal techniques to evaluate the cogency of everyday argumentation. Most of the semester will be spent becoming familiar with a variety of elementary logical techniques and rules: distinguishing inductive from deductive arguments, valid from invalid arguments, mastering the formal rules of inference, truth tables and the propositional logic. Some find this material fascinating in its own right. Others value logic for the light it casts on everyday argumentation, and for its uses in philosophy, mathematics, and computing. Logical skills are not only an important component of aptitude tests such as the GRE and LSAT, but are also valuable in almost any course or job that involves using analytical techniques. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 2, 4: Critical Thinking, Mathematical/Logical Reasoning)

Goal Area 5 - History and Social Sciences

The following courses apply to MNTC Goal 5. To complete the goal, students must complete at least two courses from two different disciplines.

ANTH100 Introduction to Anthropology (4 Credits)

Introduction to Anthropology is a survey course investigating the biological and cultural nature of humans and their past. The course examines our evolutionary beginning and the role culture plays among humans. Examined also is the methods anthropologists use to study the discipline. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

ANTH121 Cultural Anthropology (4 Credits)

This course will take an in-depth look into four different cultures. We will look at cultures from Band, Tribe, Chiefdom and State levels of political-social organization. The theoretical focus of anthropological thought in the class will be include; functionalism, structuralism, configurationism, neo-evolutionism and cultural materialism. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 5, 7: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

ECON110 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 Credits)

Macroeconomics is the study of issues that affect whole economies including economic growth, employment levels, management of the money supply, international trade, and economic instability. The course will examine tools governments can use to stabilize and grow economies, as well as controversies surrounding their use. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) This class satisfies MnTC Goal Area 5 (History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences) and MnTC Goal Area 9 (Ethical and Civic Responsibility).

ECON120 Principles of Microeconomics (3 Credits)

Microeconomics is the study of how people, businesses, governments, and other institutions make economic decisions. Topics include market price determination, income determination, resource allocation, and impacts of government policies. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) This course satisfies MnTC goal areas 5 (History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences) and 9 (Ethical and Civic Responsibility).

ECON130 Economics of Public Issues (3 Credits)

Approaches used by economists to analyze controversial public policy issues will be introduced. In addition, students will read articles explaining or advocating contrasting sides to issues. A variety of topics will be studied, with the list changing in different semesters. Topic examples may include economic inequality, climate change, and remedies for the Great Recession. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

ETHN101 American Racial Minorities (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the importance and the understanding of the nature of race relations in the United States of America. Students will use the various sociological perspectives as a lens to examine the social construction of race, ethnicity and the evolving nature of race and ethnic relations in the U.S. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

ETHN110 The Immigrant Experience (3 Credits)

This course is devoted to understanding controversial issues around immigration to the U.S. The United States is an immigrant country. No other land can challenge America's claim as the ultimate melting pot, although we can argue about whether or not we have really "melted together" to form a cohesive society. Immigrants play a significant role in enriching American culture and fueling economic growth. Yet at the same time, they are also regarded as an "unsettling force" and a burden on the taxpayers. As the numbers of legal as well as illegal, immigrants have climbed precipitously since the 1970s and 1980s, we have seen a backlash against immigration. Immigrants have always been a part of the American scene, but in some periods, more people have come than in others. Currently, immigration is a hot topic as many immigrants are coming from countries such as Somalia, Laos and Mexico. This course will explore questions such as: What is an "American"?; Where do "Americans" come from?; What kinds of immigration issues will affect the future of the United States?; What relevance does immigration have to my life? (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

GEOG100 Elements of Geography (3 Credits)

The course will answer the question "What is Geography?" Therefore, this course provides students with an introduction to the basic themes of geography. The scope and nature of geographic inquiry is used to explore topics about the physical and human characteristics of the Earth's surface. Special emphasis is placed on the significance of humans, environment, and cultural processes in the organization of space on the earth's surface. Natural and cultural landscapes are very important components of this course and students will examine physiographic regions, climates, demography, and urban areas. Also, different environmental issues will be discussed. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

GEOG103 Introduction to Cultural Geography (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to cultural geography through the study of global patterns of many aspects of human culture, including population, migration, folk and popular culture, language, religion, ethnicity, political geography, development, agriculture, industry, services, urban patterns, and resource issues. Students will examine all of these and several other issues during the semester. Students will stress the variation in the cultural landscape and critically analyze several current problems facing modern society, such as overpopulation and differences between societies. Cultural geography is focused on those things that are human-created. Therefore, the basic theme addressed throughout the course will be to discover where and why human activities are located where they are found. Students will participate in the discussions and will exchange ideas that will help them to better understand the diversity of the cultural landscape and the similarities and differences between different social groups. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

GEOG200 Special Topics in Geography: (3 Credits)

Students will explore a region to learn its unique characteristics and how its physical geography and human geography are closely linked within that region. The focus will be on real-world and hands-on activities that will use an inquiry-driven approach to learning. When applicable, geographic tools, such as GIS (Geographic Information Systems), remote sensing, and map skills, will be presented. The course will have a research component. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences)

HIST120 U.S. History I (4 Credits)

This course surveys the history of America from the contributions of the indigenous indian people through the Colonial Era (17th and 18th centuries) to the American Revolution and Early Republic (18th and 19th centuries). It examines how historical American culture, institutions, and events influence the present United States in the latter part of the twentieth century. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

HIST121 U. S. History II (4 Credits)

This course surveys the history of America from the Civil War and Reconstruction, through the New South and the New West, Industrialization, Populism and Progressivism, World War I, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II, Cold War America, the 1960's, Vietnam and Beyond. It examines how historical American culture, institutions, and events influence the present United States in the latter part of the twentieth century. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

HIST160 World History I (4 Credits)

This course is a survey of world history examining ancient, classical, and medieval civilizations prior to the emergence of the West as a world power (c. 3500 BCE - 1450 CE). The course explores how environmental, economic, political, social, religious and other intellectual and cultural factors combined in different ways to influence the development of major world regions - Africa, EurAsia, and the Americas. The goal is for students to understand how fundamental institutions and cultural norms of different world regions developed out of their own internal environments as well as in response to developments and influences from other cultural systems and historical forces. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

HIST161 World History II: The Rise of the West (4 Credits)

The history of world civilizations from 1500 C.E. through World War I, the rise of Europe, the age of revolutions, colonization and resistance to colonization, industrialization and its effects on people living in both imperialist and colonized societies and the connection between industrialization and imperialism as causes of World War I. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

HIST162 World History III: The Twentieth Century (4 Credits)

This course will present a history of world civilizations from 1900 to the present. Course topics will include the rise of national liberation movements beginning with the Boxer Rebellion of 1900, decolonization, total war, holocausts, globalization, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, the Cold War, terrorism, fundamentalism and the rise of the United States as the only superpower at the end of the 20th century. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History & Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

HIST205 Special Topics in History: (1 - 4 Credits)

Any HIST class has been specially designed by an SCC History instructor to appeal to SCC students. The instructor has chosen the subject material related to his/her interests, students' interests, or his/her teaching expertise. (Prerequisites: Any HIST course or instructor permission) (MNTC 5, 8: History & the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

POL 110 American Government (3 Credits)

American Government introduces students to the fundamentals of American National Government. The course includes an examination of basic American political principles and practices, the Constitution, major institutions, and civil liberties. The objective of this course is to acquaint students with the complexities of the American political system. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical and Civic Responsibility)

PSYC100 Introduction to Psychology (4 Credits)

This course will introduce the broad spectrum of theories and applications that make up the field of psychology. Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes, and how they are affected by physical and mental states, and external environments and social forces. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences)

PSYC110 Lifespan Psychology (3 Credits)

This is an introductory course examining human development across the lifespan, with emphasis on normal physical, cognitive, and social development. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

PSYC140 Psychology of Positive Adjustment (4 Credits)

The Psychology of Positive Adjustment introduces students to the scientific literature on positive adjustment to modern life. We will examine the questions: What is well-being and happiness? Who achieves it? Why does it elude some people? Which practices foster well-being and happiness? We will draw from the research in social psychology, neuroscience, personality psychology, cognitive psychology and sociocultural psychology. The course will incorporate the concepts of ethical living, values clarification, and civic responsibility as part of the mature development of psychological well-being. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

PSYC210 Social Psychology (4 Credits)

Social Psychology introduces the broad spectrum of theories and applications that make up the field of social psychology. Social Psychology is the scientific study of human interactions and includes issues of aggression, attraction, self, benevolence, attitude development and change, prejudice, etc. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or any other college-level psychology course) (MNTC 5, 8: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Global Perspective)

PSYC220 Health Psychology (4 Credits)

Health psychology is a subfield of psychology that addresses the mental, emotional, behavioral, and societal factors that influence the onset, duration, recovery, and prevention of illness and the promotion of wellness. Students will explore the theoretical foundations of health psychology and the role of psychological research and principles relevant to the field. Students will be exposed to a variety of topics including stress and coping, preventative behaviors and attitudes, treatment options, and management of pain and illness. Students will gain an understanding of the academic issues and a respect for the human experience related to health, illness, and disease. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology or any other college-level psychology course. Must have a score of 77.5 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 5: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences)

PSYC230 Abnormal Psychology (4 Credits)

In this course, students will increase their awareness and understanding of mental illness and psychological disorders. Students will become familiar with the history of the field, clinical descriptions, classification, etiology, course of onset, and typical treatment regimens specific to various disorders and mental illness. Abnormal behavior will be explored from various theoretical perspectives including psychological, biological, and socio-cultural approaches. (Prerequisites: 8 credits of psychology or consent of instructor) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

PSYC240 Child and Adolescent Psychology (4 Credits)

This course examines the development of children from conception through adolescence. The major areas of focus include physical, cognitive, language, moral, and social development. The developing child will be understood as an active participant in a world of biological, familial, social, and cultural influences that help shape his or her individual life path. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

PSYC250 Industrial Organizational Psychology (4 Credits)

Industrial-organizational (I/O) psychology is the scientific study of the workplace. Students will be introduced to a variety of issues of relevance to business and industry, including selection and placement of employees, the importance of training and development, organizational development and evaluation, employee motivation and productivity, and the importance of fostering work-life balance. Diversity among organizations and cultures in how they approach these issues will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

PSYC280 Special Topics in Psychology: (4 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding of a special topic within the field of psychology. Key theoretical and historical underpinnings will be presented to prepare a foundation of understanding. Attention will be focused on how the topic has or may add to the knowledge base of psychology and, if applicable, other academic disciplines. Students will explore the actual or potential applicability of the topic to self, others, and society at large. The course will have a research component. Course may address one of Goal Areas 7-10 depending on the topic. (Prerequisites: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor) (MNTC 5: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences)

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (3 Credits)

The world is a far more diverse place than you might think! This course is a broad survey of sociology and its practical uses for all of us. In this course, students are introduced to a variety of topics, emphasizing breadth rather than depth. After learning about the basic theories and methods of sociology, students will cover topics such as race, gender, education, religion, social class, work, family, the environment, government and politics, organizations and bureaucracy, and other topics. Students will learn about the nature of all of these areas and their effects on individuals and their broader implications for society. In the end, students will leave with a far greater understanding of how society is organized and what that means for where we have been, where we are, and where we are going as a people. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 5 & 8: History and Social Sciences, Global Perspective)

SOC 106 Introduction to Criminal Justice (4 Credits)

This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system in the United States, including the foundations, role, structure, and realities of the police, courts, and corrections. Sociological perspectives are applied to an analysis of crime and victimization, ethics, and the concept of justice. Students will also learn about current issues facing the criminal justice system. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOC 110 Social Problems (3 Credits)

This course is a survey of the sociology of a selected set of social problems in the U.S. and globally, e.g. crime and violence, poverty, unemployment, war and terrorism, environmental degradation, and population growth. The social-structural and cultural sources of these problems are critically analyzed, and structural and cultural solutions following from such analyses are examined. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Human Diversity)

SOC 201 Marriage and Family (3 Credits)

The Sociology of Marriage and Family will help students understand this dynamic institution as an important variable in our contemporary society. Students will be exposed to the various sociological perspectives, methods of study, and core concepts related to the institution of Marriage and Family. Simultaneously, students will also learn how the diverse institution of Marriage and Family continues to affect and inform the society at the local, national and global level. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Human Diversity)

SOC 205 Special Topics in Sociology: (3 Credits)

Special Topics in Sociology is a course that is used to cover a specific sociological area that is not otherwise covered by the other sociology courses offered. This course will explore the basic principles, theories, methodologies, and contemporary research and issues of the topic indicated in the course title on the registration page. Students should expect this course to be a survey of topics in the given sociological sub-discipline. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOC 206 Juvenile Delinquency (3 Credits)

This course will provide a survey of sociological perspectives on juvenile delinquency. Juvenile delinquency has only existed as a distinct subdiscipline of criminology for about 100 years. The change in ideas reflects the unique challenges in dealing with delinquents: children commit different kinds of crimes in different ways, their motivations differ from adults, and the effective correction of these behaviors is distinct and separate from adult corrections. This course will survey sociological perspectives of these issues, how delinquents develop, how to identify delinquents and target them for interventions, as well as various "best practices" when it comes to dealing with delinquents. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOC 210 Social Stratification - Who Gets What and Why? (3 Credits)

This course examines the central question of "who gets what and why?" in the contemporary world. In answering this question, the course focuses on the social arrangements of social stratification and inequality and their effects on society and individual lives. It critically examines the historical, theoretical, and empirical foundations, manifestations, and maintenance of social class difference, power and conflict. The course primarily examines the United States, but, because the U.S. is not isolated from world affairs, including global economic affairs, it will necessarily also tend to more global concerns. While cultivating a critical understanding of the nature of social stratification and inequalities, the course will explore alternatives and possibilities for a more equitable and humane society with both individual and structural levels of analysis. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 8: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Global Perspective)

SOC 251 Criminology and Criminal Behavior (4 Credits)

This course is designed to develop an understanding of criminally deviant behavior and how it is studied within the discipline of sociology. Students will study criminological theories, theories of causation of crime, as well as the current "trends" in crime coupled with an exhaustive profile of criminals engaging in a given area of crime. Topics of study include the pathology of murder and violent crime, rape, burglary, larceny, white collar crimes such as embezzlement, corporate crime, cybercrime, organized crime, street gangs, and other areas. Public policy implications and considerations from the local to national levels will be examined. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOC 259 Drugs and Society (3 Credits)

This course focuses on drug use and abuse as a social rather than as a medical or psychopathological phenomenon. Specifically, the course deals with the history of drug use and regulatory attempts in the United States and around the world; the relationship between drug use and race/social class; pharmacology and use patterns related to specific drugs; perspectives on the causes of drug abuse; AIDS prevention and harm reduction interventions; drug-using subcultures; drug policy, drug dealing and street gangs, drug legislation, and drug enforcement; and the promotion and condemnation of drug activities in the mass media. Each week, students can expect to discuss one of these issues and also view an episode of a program from the popular media used as a basis for discussion. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 5, 9: History/Social & Behavioral Science, Ethical & Civic Responsibility)

SOWK105 Social Welfare Services (3 Credits)

This course will discuss the history of social welfare as an institution. Various social problems will be examined and discussed in terms of at-risk populations, societal norms and values, and how policy is developed to address these problems. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

SOWK110 Community Social Service Projects (3 Credits)

This course is a group-based, experiential learning course that will help students learn problem solving and critical thinking skills to help a target population. Students will learn how to work with action and target groups to assess a social issue, then research, design, implement, and evaluate a community social service project to help address a need that arose from that social issue. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher AND completion of either ENGL 0090 or EAP 0095 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.) (MNTC 5, 7: History/Social & Behavioral Sciences, Human Diversity)

SOWK115 Social Welfare Services (4 Credits)

This course will discuss the history of social welfare as an institution. Various social problems will be examined and discussed in terms of at-risk populations, societal norms and values, and how policy is developed to address these problems. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100) (MnTC Goal Areas: 5, 7)

Goal Area 6 - Humanities and Fine Arts

The following courses apply to MNTC Goal 6. To complete the goal, students must select at least two courses from two different disciplines.

ART 100 Art Appreciation (3 Credits)

Art Appreciation is the historical and topical study of art and its relationship to culture and society. This course incorporates the extensive use of visual materials to teach the essentials and aesthetics of art, civilization, and daily life. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 110 Art Structure (3 Credits)

Art Structure is an introductory studio course for all students. It is designed to acquaint the student with the materials and techniques of the visual artist, principles of design, basic color theory, creativity, and the artistic process. Students will explore and produce works in various traditional and contemporary media of the visual arts. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 115 Three Dimensional Design (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to creating art in three dimensions. It is designed to acquaint students with traditional and non-traditional 3D materials, techniques and concepts. Students will learn about the elements and principles of composition in three dimensions and the various ways this art can be used as a tool for aesthetic and conceptual understanding. Students will apply their understanding of these concepts through hands-on studio work as well as through evaluation and analysis in critiques and class discussions. (Prerequisite: none.) (MNTC 6: The Humanities--The Arts, Literature and Philosophy)

ART 120 Metal Art (3 Credits)

This course introduces you to the creative process of metal arts. You will use a variety of materials and will work with both traditional and contemporary methods of metal fabrication. Designs will initially be art ideas which will be articulated through a traditional mode of drawing before articulated into a metal form. Primary Assemblage methods include Brazing, Welding, Cutting, Fabricating, Finishing, and Patina; Primary Materials include a variety of steel, brass/bronze, aluminum, and found objects. Lectures and critiques include some historical, cultural, and environmental issues of public sculpture. The emphasis on art ideas as they relate to form, space, and time. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 125 Sculpture (3 Credits)

Sculpture will introduce students to the basic concepts, techniques, materials and methods used to create three-dimensional objects, installations and site-specific works. Students will explore three-dimensional form, and space while experimenting with fabrication, assemblage and carving techniques. Students will learn basic principles of design as they relate to sculpture and the three-dimensional environment. Extra learner supplies required. (Prerequisites: ART 110) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 130 Painting (3 Credits)

Painting is an introductory studio course in the elements of traditional and contemporary oil painting. Students will explore and discuss the various techniques and methods basic to the creation of paintings. Students will participate in the discussions and critiques of traditional and contemporary paintings and explore the creative process via the medium of oil paint. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 135 Introduction to Watercolor (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to Watercolor and the various ways it can be used as a creative tool for aesthetic and conceptual understanding. Students will expand their skills in compositional design through the study and practice of the Elements of Art and the Principles of Organization: Line, Shape, Texture, Value, Color, Space, Balance, Emphasis, Rhythm, Scale/Proportion and Unity. Also examined and practiced in class are the painting techniques of watercolor, including the preservation of whites, transparencies, bleeds, dropping color, wet on wet technique, drybrush and lifting. Through lectures and visual references, historical and contemporary examples of watercolor will be explored and analyzed to expand students understanding of fine art and their own work within this context. In addition, students will learn how to discuss, analyze and evaluate their own work as well as the work of their peers, through class discussions and critiques. Additional learner supplies will be required for this course. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 140 Digital Photography (3 Credits)

Introduction to the conceptual, technical and historical aspects of photography as a creative medium using digital technology within the fine arts context. Students study camera operation and techniques, composition and design, digital image capture, related software, and digital output. This class also utilizes the computer as a digital darkroom to enhance photographic images. Projects provide students with an understanding of how photographs function, not only technically, but also visually and conceptually. Students must have a digital camera; (variable F. Stop, and shutter recommended) Textbook and other supplies will also be required. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 145 Mixed-Media (3 Credits)

This course engages students in a three-dimensional art making experience that draws from a variety of studio practices. Students will participate in artistic endeavors involving traditional and non-traditional materials, techniques and concepts. Emphasis is placed upon the development of aesthetic, conceptual and technical skills to further personal artistic evolution. (Prerequisite: none.) (MNTC 6: The Humanities--The Arts, Literature and Philosophy)

ART 150 Drawing I (3 Credits)

This drawing course will further the students' understanding of the core elements of drawing: line, composition, perspective, proportion, texture, value, and shading. These drawing elements will be taught through both traditional and modern methods. The course will also include several short lectures to give examples of the work, and to expand art appreciation. There will be a strong emphasis on the student's ability to critique their own work along with their peers. The dialogue within the classroom will help to expand the student's skills and process. (Prerequisites: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 155 Visual Narrative (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of visual narrative and the various ways it can be used as a tool for aesthetic and conceptual expression. Students will expand their knowledge of storytelling in artistic practice by examining compositional design, symbolic imagery and sequential image making. While studying the methodology of narrative, students will create their own storyboard layout in preparation for a final, refined visual narrative presentation in the student's format of choice, (film/video, graphic novel, drawings/paintings, etc.) In addition, this course will also explore visual narratives from cultures that are not mainstream American culture. Included in this examination is the study of non-linear and multi-linear formats. Through the investigation of traditional and non-traditional visual narrative, students will be provided with the tools to express their own voice with new insight and perspective. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 7: Humanities and Fine Arts, Human Diversity)

ART 165 Public Art (3 Credits)

Public Art is a painting course focused on the creation of art through painting a large-scale mural. Students will work collaboratively to complete the site-specific work while developing and refining their painting and drawing skills. Through lectures and presentations, historical and contemporary examples of mural painting will be explored, giving students a sound basis for understanding the significance of murals in the historical and global context. Students will hone drawing skills while transferring the design onto the wall surface, learn to mix colors and to adapt painting techniques to the use of exterior latex paint. Students will also learn to work cooperatively with others on the completion of the project, and to align their work with one another in order to develop a cohesive single painting. They will critique the work on a weekly basis as the project progresses, keeping journals of their experience and using photographic documentation as a means of analyzing technical development. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 170 Digital Video Production (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of digital video production. Students will learn how to produce digital video productions utilizing story-boarding, lighting and shooting techniques. Students will use video and audio editing software to import, assemble and edit clips, add transitions, create super-impositions and titles in finished video productions. In addition, they will learn hardware set-up, capturing techniques and video compression schemes as they output their work to various video formats. The course also examines the history and application of video in contemporary art, documentary, film and television production. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 180 Digital Photography 2 (3 Credits)

This course will introduce the student to both the practical and theoretical application of controlling the digital photographer's most important tool, light. The course will deal with, through the use of light modifying devices and software, how to control the direction, quantity, quality, ratio and color of light for both outdoor (natural) and indoor (existing) light. Students enrolled in this course will study advanced lighting techniques, contemporary practices and theories in digital photography. Students will work with intermediate and advanced digital imaging software. This course will emphasize the student's development of individual artistic voice applied in a portfolio of digital photographic images. Students enrolling in this course are required to supply their own digital camera, tripod, image editing software, and lighting equipment as specified in the course syllabus. Image editing software will also be available for use in the open computer lab at South Central College's North Mankato campus. (Prerequisite: None) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 201 Art History I (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of visual culture from prehistory through the Middle Ages, including art and architecture from both Western and non-Western cultures. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

ART 202 Art History II (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of visual culture, including art and architecture, from the Middle Ages to the present time.(Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

ART 240 Digital Photography 2 (3 Credits)

This course will introduce the student to both the practical and theoretical application of controlling the digital photographer's most important tool, light. The course will deal with, through the use of light modifying devices and software, how to control the direction, quantity, quality, ratio and color of light for both outdoor (natural) and indoor (existing) light. Students enrolled in this course will study advanced lighting techniques, contemporary practices and theories in digital photography. Students will work with intermediate and advanced digital imaging software. This course will emphasize the student's development of individual artistic voice applied in a portfolio of digital photographic images. Students enrolling in this course are required to supply their own digital camera, tripod, image editing software, and lighting equipment as specified in the course syllabus. Image editing software will also be available for use in the open computer lab at South Central College's North Mankato campus. (Prerequisite: ART 140 or instructor approval) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ART 250 Drawing II (3 Credits)

This course builds upon the concepts of Drawing I (ART 150). Students will further their understanding of drawing issues by creating artwork that explores process, personal imagery, formal analysis, and conceptual goals. Historical and contemporary models will continue to be explored and discussed relative to the students' own artwork. (Prerequisite: ART 150) (MNTC 6: The Humanities--The Arts, Literature and Philosophy)

ART 270 Digital Video Production 2 (3 Credits)

This course covers advanced digital video techniques including scripting, lighting, shooting, editing and the overall video/audio production sequence. Students will develop advanced skills for any profession that involves video production such as television, documentation, filmmaking, contemporary art, web design, multimedia communication, animation and computer gaming. Students will use advanced non-linear video and audio editing software. Final project is a video series or single production of substantial length within the field of artistic, commercial and/or documentary video. Students will examine and utilize advanced application of cinematic philosophy, production techniques and technologies in the fields of film, videography, documentary production, and multimedia. This course also covers the current visual culture and how it applies to a digital cinematic/video production. Students will participate as a member of a production crew on college productions when available. (Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in ART 170 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL110 Introduction to Literature (4 Credits)

Introduction to Literature allows students to sample various literary forms (plays, prose, poetry, nonfiction) from various histories and cultures. The course is designed to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills, and increase appreciation of the diversity of human experience. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and the Fine Arts)

ENGL111 Introduction to Film (4 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce and acclimate students to film as a significant artistic, rhetorical and cultural medium. Course content focuses on film as an element of popular culture, as well as film genres, cinematic techniques and cinematic conventions. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MnTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL120 Human Diversity in Literature and Film (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to works of literature and film with a focus on understanding the literary and cinematic contributions made by under-represented peoples. The course is designed to develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills, and increase appreciation of the diversity of human experience. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 6, 7: Humanities and Fine Arts, Human Diversity)

ENGL130 World Literature and Film (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to works of literature and film from a variety of world cultures. The course is designed to increase knowledge of world cultures and appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in representation and in seeing, believing, and being. The course emphasizes critical thinking, reading, and writing. (Prerequisites: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

ENGL140 British Literature (4 Credits)

This is a one-semester course for students who are interested in the development of English thought and language from the days of the Anglo-Saxons to the present time. Students will examine the historical context of the literature as well as particular authors, ideas, and styles. Class time will be devoted to reading, discussing, and analyzing selected groups of writings representative of major historical periods in the development of British writing. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL150 Introduction to Poetry (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to various elements of the genre of poetry, including (but not limited to) word choice, images, figures of speech, symbols, sounds, patterns of rhythm, and poetic forms . Students will use literary criticism techniques as they study poets and poems from many times, places, and movements of literature. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL160 Introduction to Short Story (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the genre of short story and literary analysis. Students will examine literary concepts such as time, setting, place, narrative, plot, characterization, and literary device. They will also study the authors and the influence of history and place on the short story form. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL205 Special Topics in Literature & Film: (4 Credits)

All ENGL 205 courses help students understand how literature and film tell stories and create versions of history. Students will explore literary concepts such as time, setting, place, narrative, plot, characterization, and literary device. Students will also study the individual cultures that generate the narratives covered in the class. Any ENGL 205 class has been specially designed by an SCC English instructor to appeal to SCC students. The instructor has chosen the subject material related to his or her interests, students' interests, or his or her teaching expertise. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or instructor permission.) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL206 Children's Literature (4 Credits)

Children's Literature provides a survey of literature for children from through history to its place in contemporary society. The course introduces students to literature for children from birth to age 21, pairing literature with cognitive, emotional, and social development. Students will explore children's literature as real literature, examining literary concepts such as time, setting, place, narrative, plot, characterization, and literary device. We will also study the individual aspects of culture(s) that generate the narratives covered in class and how children's literature can create its own version of history and reflect its culture. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL208 African American Literature (4 Credits)

Surveys African American literature, including short stories, poetry, novels and criticism. Students will be thoroughly acquainted with a scope of African American authors, poets and recognize their contributions to the contextual fabric of America. Students will explore many historical benchmarks within African American history such as slavery, the Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights movement. This course will situate literary works within these historic and cultural contexts, but will also emphasize close readings of the texts. (Prerequisites: This course requires a passing grade in ENGL 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6, 7: Humanities & Fine Arts, Human Diversity)

ENGL210 Introduction to Creative Writing (4 Credits)

This course introduces students to the study of creative writing. Course content focuses primarily on reading several genres of writing (e.g., short story, poetry, non-fiction, and play/screenplay) and then practicing those forms and completing constructive critique of students' practice. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL220 Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)

For students who have been introduced to the study of creative writing, this course content will focus primarily on the development of fiction-writing skills through reading, evaluating, and practicing the form. Emphasis will be placed on elements of fiction such as character, setting, plot, theme, point of view, and narrative voice. Constructive critique and revision will be practiced. Assignments may take the form of reading, written critical evaluations of literature, quizzes, and student presentations, as well as student creation of works of fiction. (Prerequisite: ENGL 210 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities and Fine Arts)

ENGL230 Creative Writing: Screen Writing (4 Credits)

For students who are interested in the study of creative writing or film-making, this course content will focus primarily on the development of screen-writing skills through watching film clips, reading screenplays, evaluating story conveyance through the film medium, and practicing writing in the form. Emphasis will be placed on creating a story arc with a three-act sequence while incorporating elements of fiction such as character, setting, plot, theme, point of view, and elements of film such as scene set-up, camera angle, transitions, and primarily dialogue. Constructive critique and revision will be practiced. Assignments may take the form of reading, written critical evaluations of film and literature, occasional quizzes, student presentations, discussion, as well as student creation of screenplay. (Prerequisite: ENGL 100) (MNTC 6: The Humanities and Fine Arts)

HUM 111 Introduction to Film (4 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce and acclimate students to film as a significant artistic, rhetorical and cultural medium. Course content focuses on film as an element of popular culture, as well as film genres, cinematic techniques and cinematic conventions. (Prerequisite: Must have a score of 78 or higher on the Reading portion of the Accuplacer test or completion of READ 0080 and READ 0090 with a grade of C or higher) (MNTC 6: Humanities & Fine Arts)

HUM 121 Introduction to the Humanities (4 Credits)

This course is an overview of the principal trends in Western thought and artistic expression from ancient times to the contemporary. Its aim is to foster an appreciation of how diverse ideas and works of art have contributed to our understanding of the universal human experience. Classroom instruction will be supplemented by guided tours of museums/exhibitions, and attendance at live performances of works pertinent to the course. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6: Humanities & Fine Arts)

HUM 122 Introduction to Humanities II (4 Credits)

This course is an overview of the principal trends in Western thought and artistic expression from the Middle Ages transition into the Renaissance to the modern world. Its aim is to foster an appreciation of how diverse ideas and works of art have contributed to our understanding of the universal human experience. Classroom instruction will be supplemented by guided tours of museums/exhibitions, and attendance at live performances of works pertinent to the course. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities & Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

HUM 130 China: Cultural Tradition and Change (3 Credits)

Students in this course study the expression of Chinese values through intellectual and artistic pursuits and their influence on humans throughout the world. By taking a panoramic view of Chinese culture and civilization, students develop an appreciation for the treasure of Chinese achievements and the wealth of Chinese contributions to humanity. This view will also provide a context for the study of specific topics such as artistic expression, language, key points in history, traditions, human rights and conditions, and philosophy of health. Beyond an appreciation for Chinese culture, this introductory course aims to increase our understanding of China's presence, which has risen to a dominant position in global economic and political affairs. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC Goal Areas 6 Humanities and Fine Arts and 8 Global Perspective).

HUM 150 Global Connections Travel Seminar (1 Credit)

The Global Connections Seminar is a one-credit course which prepares students for traveling with one or more instructors. Its specific content will be determined by the intended destination, and will include information on the history, geography, culture, art, and religion of that region. THE SEMINAR IS ONLY OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE SIGNED UP FOR THE TRIP. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities & Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

HUM 205 Special Topics in the Humanities: (1 - 4 Credits)

Any HUM class that has been specially designed by an SCC Humanities instructor to appeal to SCC students. The instructor has chosen the subject material related to his/her interests, students' interests, or his/her teaching expertise. (Prerequisite: All HUM 205 courses require a passing grade in ENGL 100 or instructor permission) (MNTC 6: Humanities & Fine Arts)

HUM 250 Global Connections Travel Seminar II (1 - 3 Credits)

The Global Connections Seminar is a three-credit course which travel with one or more instructors. Its specific content will be determined by the intended destination, and will include information on the history, geography, culture, art, and religion of that region. THE SEMINAR IS ONLY OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE SIGNED UP FOR THE TRIP. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities & Fine Arts, Global Perspective)

PHIL105 World Religions (4 Credits)

This course is a basic introduction to the major world religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It also explores related issues in the Philosophy of Religion. (Prerequisites: Must have a Next-Generation Accuplacer Reading score of 250 or higher, or Classic Accuplacer Reading score of 78 or higher, or completion of either READ 0090 or EAP 0090 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or ACT Reading score of 21 or higher or MCA Reading score of 1047 or higher.) (MNTC 6, 8: Humanities and Fine Arts, Global Perspective)